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Leap Year

NEWS
February 28, 1992 | NONA YATES
Notice anything unusual about this year? No, not the presidential campaign and elections. . . . There's an extra day, 366 instead of the usual 365. 1992 is a Leap Year. "Leap days" are added every four years to bring the calendar in line with Earth's orbit around the sun, which takes about 365 1/4 days. Without leap days, it could get so out of sync that at some point we would be celebrating Christmas in the middle of summer.
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NEWS
February 28, 1992 | LISA MASCARO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like the Olympics and presidential elections, leap year comes every four years, offering babies born on Feb. 29 and couples married on that day a quadrennial chance to celebrate. Hospitals nationwide will welcome about 9,000 newborns Saturday, and Orange County parents are bracing for a few of them. There were 107 children born in Orange County last leap year day (the odds against being born on Feb. 29 are 1,461 to 1; the odds are 365 to 1 on any day in a normal year).
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We sincerely hope that your weekend celebration plans are going smoothly. What's there to celebrate, you ask? Leap Year. Just ask the Horn brothers of Newbury Park. They recognize the importance of Feb. 29. They even began planning for it about the first week of January. "I realized that all of a sudden this was Leap Year," Scott Horn said. "I looked at the calendar and said, 'Oh, God. I don't remember it being on a Saturday before.'
NEWS
February 25, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is Valentine's Day at a fancy hotel restaurant. The dining room is filled with couples, and the romance in the air is so thick that it feels as if Cupid has just passed through on an uncontrolled rampage of love. Bright red and pink balloons float from railings. Roses are strewn everywhere. Hands reach across tables for two and softly touch. And in a dimly lit corner of the room--a proposal. Cindy Vanderweide and Ron Burns were friends for several years before they fell in love 11 months ago.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is Valentine's Day at a fancy hotel restaurant. The dining room is filled with couples, and the romance in the air is so thick that it feels as if Cupid has just passed through on an uncontrolled rampage of love. Bright red and pink balloons float from railings. Roses are strewn everywhere. Hands reach across tables for two and softly touch. And in a dimly lit corner of the room--a proposal. Cindy Vanderweide and Ron Burns were friends for several years before they fell in love 11 months ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1990 | DIRK SUTRO
During the 1970s, Gil Scott-Heron applied his satiric wit to the nation. He wrote opinionated songs he half sang and half chanted in a rhythmic style that made him a forerunner of today's rappers. He sold albums. But it's almost as if Scott-Heron vanished from Earth around 1979. That's when the "Reader's Guide to Periodic Literature" last mentioned him, citing a review in Downbeat, the national jazz magazine.
NEWS
December 18, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Erickson has an apocalyptic imagination and a one-room apartment in Hollywood. But it's OK, really. At last--pushing 40 and thanks to his dark vision--he's who he wants to be: published novelist, four books to his credit, good reviews, a growing reputation. He also has a steady job and a regular income, more constant money than he's seen for a long time, he says. It could be a lot worse. For 15 of the last 20 years it was a lot worse.
MAGAZINE
October 15, 1989 | JACK SMITH
IN REFLECTING recently on the wonders that came after the graduation of Nardi Reeder Campion's Wellesley class of 1938 (among them penicillin, panty hose and the Pill), I observed that her list was indeed "a stunning catalogue of the technological changes our generation has exper-ienced." Writes Henry L. Scharff of Thousand Oaks: "Modern history was born, as a matter of fact, before 1938. It isn't hard to see it if one knows a bit of history and a few dates."
BOOKS
October 15, 1989 | Charles Bowden, Bowden is a free-lance writer
Steve Erickson, a surrealistic novelist based in Los Angeles, traveled 7,000 miles by train and auto in 23 states tracking the 1988 presidential election. He was in Atlanta for the Democratic convention, but mainly bagged the event by television in his hotel room. He was in New Orleans for the Republican Convention, but split before it began in order to take in the music and bars of Austin, Tex., as well as a UFO belt in the Panhandle. He was periodically hounded by Sen.
SPORTS
May 19, 1989 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, Times Staff Writer
Two years ago, Lori Svoboda was leaping her way into prominence at El Dorado High School. Svoboda, then a sophomore, became an Orange County sensation in the girls' high jump. She won almost every meet she entered, and set the top mark in the state that year--5-feet 10 1/4-inches--in winning the event at the 1987 Southern Section Masters meet. She was named the 1987 Times' Orange County girls' track and field athlete of the year. Then came 1988--a year Svoboda would like to forget, at least as far as the high jump is concerned.
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