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NEWS
September 6, 1992 | JEANNE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Susan Callison will never forget how terrified she was when at the beginning of second grade, it took her son, Chad, two hours to complete a simple homework spelling assignment. "I remember working with him on the word boat. I used pictures, everything, to try to help him recognize the word," said the El Toro mother and former teacher. "But after 20 minutes of working, he still didn't have a clue. It was frightening."
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HEALTH
July 19, 2004 | Kelly Young, Times Staff Writer
When freezing rain fell on Quebec in January 1998, about 1.5 million people lost electricity, businesses closed for weeks and people in the Canadian province fell into various stages of anxiety and despair. Six years later, Canadian researchers found some unlikely victims of the region's worst ice storm in decades -- children who weren't yet born.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1991 | JAMES MASON, Dr. James Mason , assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services , is head of the U.S. Public Health Service. and
People can get so excited about exotic and theoretical problems--what I call the "one-in-a-million" hazards--that I sometimes feel frustrated trying to focus attention on a very clear and common environmental poison known to affect the development of millions of our children: lead. Most people know that lead, at high levels, poisons people, causing coma, convulsions and sometimes death.
NEWS
January 21, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The school day is over and thousands of secondary students here rush home, laden with books. But it isn't the prospect of television or socializing with friends that drives the stampede. Instead, the students want to spend time with their textbooks, in hopes of absorbing even more science, history and philosophy than they learned at school. Often, teachers come to their homes as tutors hired by anxious parents.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Heralding a new era in the effort to understand heredity, researchers today published the full genetic sequence of the most important laboratory tool for deciphering the book of life: the tiny fruit fly. For a century, the humble creature, called drosophila, has been the subject of sustained scrutiny by scientists seeking to understand the unity of life. In the constricted genetic alphabet of the fly, researchers have discovered master keys to physical development and aging.
SPORTS
April 21, 1995 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colorado Coach Rick Neuheisel calls the Wonderlic Personnel Test "the SAT of the NFL." Like the Scholastic Assessment Test, which the NCAA uses to help determine freshman eligibility, the Wonderlic has been criticized for failing to accurately measure learning ability. College entrance exams have been accused of cultural bias against minorities and women and thus misleading in predicting academic success.
NEWS
January 21, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The school day is over and thousands of secondary students here rush home, laden with books. But it isn't the prospect of television or socializing with friends that drives the stampede. Instead, the students want to spend time with their textbooks, in hopes of absorbing even more science, history and philosophy than they learned at school. Often, teachers come to their homes as tutors hired by anxious parents.
HEALTH
July 19, 2004 | Kelly Young, Times Staff Writer
When freezing rain fell on Quebec in January 1998, about 1.5 million people lost electricity, businesses closed for weeks and people in the Canadian province fell into various stages of anxiety and despair. Six years later, Canadian researchers found some unlikely victims of the region's worst ice storm in decades -- children who weren't yet born.
SPORTS
April 21, 1995 | BILL PLASCHKE and ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
During the NFL's national scouting combine in February, somewhere between a poke and a prod, Penn State running back Ki-Jana Carter found himself sitting at a desk. In front of him was a pencil. And a brown four-page booklet. And somebody who looked suspiciously like a teacher. "What is this?" he said. Slowly, he scanned the front sheet. "DO EXACTLY AS YOU ARE TOLD," it read. "DO NOT TURN OVER THIS PAGE UNTIL YOU ARE INSTRUCTED TO DO SO."
NEWS
January 11, 1988
Special education in the nation's schools is segregated and second-class, with slow learners who have the ability to overcome problems exiled into inferior programs because of emphasis on test scores and other pressures, two researchers said. Their report in Harvard Educational Review urges Congress and educators to rethink policies that separate handicapped children from their peers and instead develop innovative programs to teach students with varied learning abilities in integrated settings.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Heralding a new era in the effort to understand heredity, researchers today published the full genetic sequence of the most important laboratory tool for deciphering the book of life: the tiny fruit fly. For a century, the humble creature, called drosophila, has been the subject of sustained scrutiny by scientists seeking to understand the unity of life. In the constricted genetic alphabet of the fly, researchers have discovered master keys to physical development and aging.
SPORTS
April 21, 1995 | BILL PLASCHKE and ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
During the NFL's national scouting combine in February, somewhere between a poke and a prod, Penn State running back Ki-Jana Carter found himself sitting at a desk. In front of him was a pencil. And a brown four-page booklet. And somebody who looked suspiciously like a teacher. "What is this?" he said. Slowly, he scanned the front sheet. "DO EXACTLY AS YOU ARE TOLD," it read. "DO NOT TURN OVER THIS PAGE UNTIL YOU ARE INSTRUCTED TO DO SO."
SPORTS
April 21, 1995 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colorado Coach Rick Neuheisel calls the Wonderlic Personnel Test "the SAT of the NFL." Like the Scholastic Assessment Test, which the NCAA uses to help determine freshman eligibility, the Wonderlic has been criticized for failing to accurately measure learning ability. College entrance exams have been accused of cultural bias against minorities and women and thus misleading in predicting academic success.
NEWS
September 6, 1992 | JEANNE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Susan Callison will never forget how terrified she was when at the beginning of second grade, it took her son, Chad, two hours to complete a simple homework spelling assignment. "I remember working with him on the word boat. I used pictures, everything, to try to help him recognize the word," said the El Toro mother and former teacher. "But after 20 minutes of working, he still didn't have a clue. It was frightening."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1991 | JAMES MASON, Dr. James Mason , assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services , is head of the U.S. Public Health Service. and
People can get so excited about exotic and theoretical problems--what I call the "one-in-a-million" hazards--that I sometimes feel frustrated trying to focus attention on a very clear and common environmental poison known to affect the development of millions of our children: lead. Most people know that lead, at high levels, poisons people, causing coma, convulsions and sometimes death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994
Apparently Michele Lingre is not a child psychologist, educator, media analyst or other type of "expert." Perhaps that is why she displayed such uncommon common sense in identifying what so many seem unable--or unwilling--to acknowledge: Television viewing has profound affects on children. (Let's not forget the same is true for teen-agers and adults, but because their brains are more fully developed, the magnitude of the effect is minuscule by comparison.) In her Jan. 9 commentary, "Turning Off TV Gives Child a New View of Life," Lingre points to the core issue: Television watching as an activity should be the focus of the discussion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1995 | TRACY WILSON
Ventura Unified school psychologist Ron Lay has won the 1995 Outstanding School Psychologist Award for his service to students. Lay of Newbury Park was among nine school psychologists statewide to receive the award, which was presented in San Francisco last month by the California Assn. of School Psychologists. "It's really quite a thrill for me to get this honor," said Lay, 48. "I know what my colleagues do and I know how hard-working they are."
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