Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLearning English
IN THE NEWS

Learning English

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1993
Frank Gaik's letter (Sept. 24) concerning the desirability of more rational and effective English instruction in our schools and workplaces should be required reading for all those administrative bureaucrats responsible for the formulation and implementation of educational policies in the increasingly tarnished state of California. As a Latino who has read Chaucer, Shakespeare and Milton, it has never ceased to amaze me the extent to which this country's elite has let itself become intimidated by a small but vociferous clique of largely self-serving ethnic leaders who, having fatally confused morality with culture, have sold us an impractical, romanticized, folkloric and dangerously Balkanized vision of a Latino that has never existed but in their imagination.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
For Maricela Ruiz, a trip to the store to pick up a few groceries or to her daughter's school felt nearly impossible. “I'd go home crying,” said Ruiz, 37. She couldn't speak English, and after a few failed attempts at communication, began to wait for her husband to come home to help her run errands. For Ruiz, who moved from Mexico to Pasadena two years ago, the language barrier proved isolating. But a year ago Ruiz joined Mother's Club Family Learning Center, a nonprofit in Pasadena that provides English classes to mothers and their children.
Advertisement
OPINION
June 2, 2010
Lessons of learning Re "State English instruction flaws cited," May 28 I have been a teacher of English-language learners for 26 years. I get angry and frustrated at being blamed for our students' failures. In this article, The Times balanced the many factors that go into a student's failure or achievement. Rosa Briseno's lack of interest in academics and Nathanael Cueva's desire to achieve — and his biliteracy — show the spectrum of what educators have to deal with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2013 | By Howard Blume
The state education department has ignored its obligation to make sure that thousands of students learning English receive adequate and legally required assistance, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court. State officials said they had not studied the lawsuit, but insisted they are meeting their legal obligations. The suit, filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and others, focuses on an estimated 20,000 students who are receiving no help or inadequate services as they work to learn English and keep up academically at the same time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1987
Congratulations Ann Gonzales (Letters, March 8). I too am one who had to learn English on my own about 50 years ago. We did not have English as a Second Language classes, and I learned quickly and very well. It's sad to see students who have a Latino last name put in an ESL class--just for their names--and kept there, stagnant, for at least four years. This does not teach them English; it only keeps them in their place and makes them lazy. If you are going to learn to swim, then get into the deep water and you will learn faster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1986 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Like thousands of other Mexicans, Artemisa and Federico Velarde brought their three children across the border to the United States to build them a better life, to give them a more promising future. Illegal aliens with little formal education between them, the Velardes set Alma, Isabel and their youngest, Carlos, on the trail that generations of immigrants have followed in hope of success. They enrolled them in public school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1991 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent night in Room 508 at Van Nuys Adult School, a shoemaker from Mexico and a silk-screen operator from Mexico debated, in English, a proposal for class T-shirts. The proposal came from the ebullient Nicolas Guzman, who offered to make the shirts for his classmates at the silk-screen shop where he works. His suggested slogan for the Level 3 English as a Second Language class: "The Heroic Class of Room 508."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1998 | RITA COLORITO, Rita Colorito is a research associate for a Washington-based communications firm
Anyone who channel surfs through the hundreds of stations on television and cable today is bound to come across a dozen Spanish-language stations, at least. Spanish-language channels serve the growing number of Latino American citizens in the United States by providing them with news and entertainment they can understand. However, by watching predominantly Spanish-language TV, the Latino community is isolating itself, and particularly its children, from the English-speaking community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
At Gault Street Elementary, waves of parents flow through the campus daily. Sometimes the tide is stronger, said parent center director Rosalva Waterford, but they are always there. Volunteers make copies for the teachers using one of the center's three copy machines - including the one they call la viejita (the old woman) a decades-old, yellowing behemoth that frequently gets passed over for the newer models. Parents sometimes help move classroom furniture for an activity or clean up afterward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
State officials are neglecting their legal obligation to ensure that students who are learning English are receiving an adequate and equal education, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday by the ACLU of Southern California and other advocates. The focus of the litigation is a small school system near Fresno, but the legal implications are broader: The suit accuses the state of poor oversight and says it must, by law, act to make sure these students are keeping pace academically with their peers across California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2012 | Sandy Banks
Adult education teacher Planaria Price is used to the ups and downs of budget planning in the giant Los Angeles Unified School District. Price remembers boom times in the late 1980s, when classes at Evans Community Adult School near downtown ran 24 hours a day. Money was flowing and immigrants flocked to English lessons, hoping for legalization under federal amnesty programs. And Price has stuck it out through tough downturns, when classes were cut, teachers were laid off and many vocational programs closed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2011 | Steve Lopez
In my back-to-school column two weeks ago, I wrote that parents ought to look in the mirror before pinning all the blame for the state of education on schools and teachers. Readers were with me on the idea that parents ought to be more engaged in their children's education, whether they do so at home, on campus or by marching on Sacramento. But reactions split over my suggestion that parents who make no effort to learn English aren't helping their kids or themselves. As promised, here's the follow-up.
OPINION
June 2, 2010
Lessons of learning Re "State English instruction flaws cited," May 28 I have been a teacher of English-language learners for 26 years. I get angry and frustrated at being blamed for our students' failures. In this article, The Times balanced the many factors that go into a student's failure or achievement. Rosa Briseno's lack of interest in academics and Nathanael Cueva's desire to achieve — and his biliteracy — show the spectrum of what educators have to deal with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2010 | By Howard blume
The federal government has singled out the Los Angeles Unified School District for its first major investigation under a reinvigorated Office for Civil Rights, officials said Tuesday. The focus of the probe, by an arm of the U.S. Department of Education, will be whether the nation's second-largest district provides adequate services to students learning English. Officials turned their attention to L.A. Unified because so many English learners fare poorly and because they make up about a third of district enrollment, more than 220,000 students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2009 | Teresa Watanabe
A leading California foundation plans today to announce a broad campaign to help Los Angeles immigrants become more active citizens with a new $3.75-million, five-year program to help them learn English, improve job skills and increase civic participation. The California Community Foundation in Los Angeles also is set to release a 75-page report that documents the essential and dynamic role immigrants play in the regional economy and suggests ways to help them become even more productive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2008 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
In her heart, Sonia Galdamez is Salvadoran. She speaks Spanish at home and cooks Salvadoran food for her family. But since arriving in Los Angeles nearly two years ago, she has been sworn in as a U.S. citizen and is studying English at L.A. City College. Galdamez said she doesn't have to sacrifice her traditions, roots or language to become American. "But in this country, really, they speak English," she said. "If I want to find a good job, I have to learn it."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|