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Learning English Advocates Drive

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1991
In response to "New Ways Sought to Boost Latino Education" (Part A, Jan. 27): One striking point about this article is that the solution to the problem already is available--it just isn't being utilized. The solution: Teach Latino youngsters English as quickly as possible and mainstream them into the educational system. Bilingual education may look good on paper, but the results are deplorable: a high dropout rate and an undereducated economic underclass of Latino youth. What is the solution being proposed by Latino organizations?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1991
In response to "New Ways Sought to Boost Latino Education" (Part A, Jan. 27): One striking point about this article is that the solution to the problem already is available--it just isn't being utilized. The solution: Teach Latino youngsters English as quickly as possible and mainstream them into the educational system. Bilingual education may look good on paper, but the results are deplorable: a high dropout rate and an undereducated economic underclass of Latino youth. What is the solution being proposed by Latino organizations?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1988
The Los Angeles Unified School District's bilingual education program is now in place. It is a disaster. That's the only label that fits the bilingual education program. For our immigrant children and their mostly unknowing parents, teaching English in the child's native language is the only method to be used in the Los Angeles School District. The victory is historic for the bilingual education power lobby. They salivate at the useless jobs the program creates. Our immigrant children are numbers to be tossed around for jobs, not precious persons to educate for their futures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1990
Once again, The Times (April 20) has misrepresented the positions and purpose of Learning English Advocates Drive. The Times labels LEAD "a statewide anti-bilingual education movement." Had any officer of LEAD been consulted, it would have been clear that this characterization is wholly inaccurate. LEAD is fully supportive of what the state Legislature meant bilingual education to be: a means of teaching language-minority children English and keeping them up on their other studies while they are learning it. Leo Lopez, director of the state office of bilingual education, has said students in bilingual programs "are supposed to be taught English, and to receive assistance in their native language when necessary to bridge the gap" between their home language and English.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1989
As a member of the Learning English Advocates Drive and U.S. English, I take offense to several misstatements in The Times article about a pending vote before the teachers union which would reject LAUSD's offer to pay bonuses to the district's 4,000 bilingual teachers. LEAD is seeking to eliminate such bonuses because the school board is using them to entice teachers to support the district's flawed bilingual master plan. The article's opening sentence, "A group of teachers opposed to bilingual education . . ."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1989 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, Times Staff Writer
Two groups of Latino parents marched outside a Sun Valley school Wednesday, one of them loudly chanting support for bilingual education and the other quietly backing teachers seeking the program's end. Gloria Soto, a parent who organized the group at Glenwood School that supports the anti-bilingual teachers, said, "The purpose of the march is to let the community and the district know that there has been so much slander regarding LEAD and the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1989 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writer
About 50 mostly Latino parents from across the Los Angeles school district marched in front of a Sun Valley elementary school Tuesday to protest efforts by a group of teachers seeking to end the district's bilingual education plan. Parents marching at Glenwood School said they support continuation of the district's plan to teach children academic subjects in their native languages while they learn English. Most of the parents in the protest belong to bilingual education advisory committees from different areas of the district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1990
Once again, The Times (April 20) has misrepresented the positions and purpose of Learning English Advocates Drive. The Times labels LEAD "a statewide anti-bilingual education movement." Had any officer of LEAD been consulted, it would have been clear that this characterization is wholly inaccurate. LEAD is fully supportive of what the state Legislature meant bilingual education to be: a means of teaching language-minority children English and keeping them up on their other studies while they are learning it. Leo Lopez, director of the state office of bilingual education, has said students in bilingual programs "are supposed to be taught English, and to receive assistance in their native language when necessary to bridge the gap" between their home language and English.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1989 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, Times Staff Writer
Yolanda Granados knows that Southern California employers value workers who speak both English and Spanish. So she wants her son, Luis, to grow up bilingual. But when Luis started kindergarten last fall at Glenwood School in Sun Valley, most of the instruction he received was in Spanish. Granados worried that, as a result, he would fall behind in English. She asked school officials to change her son's classroom assignment. Many Latino parents are surprised when they find out that much, and in some cases most, of the instruction in a bilingual classroom is in Spanish, said Gloria Soto, a parent activist at Glenwood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1989 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, Times Staff Writer
With her exaggerated miming during sing-alongs, her use of raisins to teach counting and her quickness to affectionately wrap her arms around a student struggling with a concept, Sally Peterson is unmistakably a kindergarten teacher. But Peterson's playful classroom image, which would seem to place her on the fringe of weighty matters of educational policy, belies her growing national prominence as a controversial opponent of widely accepted methods of bilingual education. Peterson, who has taught at Glenwood School in Sun Valley for 26 years, founded the group LEAD--Learning English Advocates Drive--two years ago because she believed that teaching methods prescribed by the Los Angeles Unified School District relied too heavily on a student's native language.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1989 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, Times Staff Writer
Yolanda Granados knows that Southern California employers value workers who speak both English and Spanish. So she wants her son, Luis, to grow up bilingual. But when Luis started kindergarten last fall at Glenwood School in Sun Valley, most of the instruction he received was in Spanish. Granados worried that, as a result, he would fall behind in English. She asked school officials to change her son's classroom assignment. Many Latino parents are surprised when they find out that much, and in some cases most, of the instruction in a bilingual classroom is in Spanish, said Gloria Soto, a parent activist at Glenwood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1989 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, Times Staff Writer
With her exaggerated miming during sing-alongs, her use of raisins to teach counting and her quickness to affectionately wrap her arms around a student struggling with a concept, Sally Peterson is unmistakably a kindergarten teacher. But Peterson's playful classroom image, which would seem to place her on the fringe of weighty matters of educational policy, belies her growing national prominence as a controversial opponent of widely accepted methods of bilingual education. Peterson, who has taught at Glenwood School in Sun Valley for 26 years, founded the group LEAD--Learning English Advocates Drive--two years ago because she believed that teaching methods prescribed by the Los Angeles Unified School District relied too heavily on a student's native language.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1989 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, Times Staff Writer
Two groups of Latino parents marched outside a Sun Valley school Wednesday, one of them loudly chanting support for bilingual education and the other quietly backing teachers seeking the program's end. Gloria Soto, a parent who organized the group at Glenwood School that supports the anti-bilingual teachers, said, "The purpose of the march is to let the community and the district know that there has been so much slander regarding LEAD and the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1989 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writer
About 50 mostly Latino parents from across the Los Angeles school district marched in front of a Sun Valley elementary school Tuesday to protest efforts by a group of teachers seeking to end the district's bilingual education plan. Parents marching at Glenwood School said they support continuation of the district's plan to teach children academic subjects in their native languages while they learn English. Most of the parents in the protest belong to bilingual education advisory committees from different areas of the district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1989
As a member of the Learning English Advocates Drive and U.S. English, I take offense to several misstatements in The Times article about a pending vote before the teachers union which would reject LAUSD's offer to pay bonuses to the district's 4,000 bilingual teachers. LEAD is seeking to eliminate such bonuses because the school board is using them to entice teachers to support the district's flawed bilingual master plan. The article's opening sentence, "A group of teachers opposed to bilingual education . . ."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1988
The Los Angeles Unified School District's bilingual education program is now in place. It is a disaster. That's the only label that fits the bilingual education program. For our immigrant children and their mostly unknowing parents, teaching English in the child's native language is the only method to be used in the Los Angeles School District. The victory is historic for the bilingual education power lobby. They salivate at the useless jobs the program creates. Our immigrant children are numbers to be tossed around for jobs, not precious persons to educate for their futures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1990
Members of United Teachers-Los Angeles, the union representing 33,000 teachers and other school professionals, defeated a measure that would require bilingual teachers to turn down $5,000-a-year bonuses from the school district, union President Wayne Johnson said Thursday. An initiative by Learning English Advocates Drive, a statewide group started by Los Angeles teachers opposed to the district's bilingual education program, was defeated by a 2-1 margin.
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