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Least Terns

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1991 | GREG HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With Mother Nature's full cooperation, a group of more than 75 volunteers spent Saturday morning clearing weeds and brush from a small island in the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve--a process designed to make it easier for endangered birds to nest when they arrive later this month. "Fortunately, we had great weather," said Esther Burkett, a wildlife biologist who supervised the activities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
CORONADO - On most days, a three-mile stretch of Silver Strand beach here is used for training Navy SEALs, sailors and Marines. Thursday was not a usual day. Dozens of sailors spent the morning in a slow, head-down walk along the restricted beach, searching for detritus that could harm the Western snowy plover and the California least tern, two imperiled bird populations that use the strand for nesting. "This is our office," said sailor Daniel Torres, 26, from New Mexico, one of the Navy beachmasters - specialists in bringing vehicles and other heavy equipment ashore from amphibious assault ships.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1999
The Ventura Audubon Society recently constructed an enclosure near the Santa Clara River estuary as a protected place for the endangered least terns to make their nests. At this time of year, many other shorebirds nest in the estuary, including American avocets, black-necked stilts, killdeer, snowy plovers, mallards and several species of herons. Thus the estuary has been declared a continentally important bird area by the American Bird Conservancy. Please refrain from taking dogs past the fenced tern area for the duration of the shorebird breeding season (through Aug. 1)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
It cost the Port of Los Angeles roughly $350,000 to make a windswept spit of sand on the southeastern edge of the world's largest container terminal as welcoming as possible for a breeding colony of endangered California least terns. Among the special touches installed in January at Pier 400 were chick fences; tons of carefully groomed imported sand; and predator controls, including live traps to keep out raccoons, feral cats and crows. Things didn't work out as planned. On a recent weekday, port biologist Kathleen Keane surveyed the 15-acre site through binoculars and shook her head in disappointment.
NEWS
November 5, 1987
Orange County breeding populations and fledgling success of the endangered California Least Tern.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1990
As a biologist, I have read with interest your articles covering environmental issues, which are generally well-written, though frequently contain minor errors. For example, the article "Buildup on Coastal Sands a Take-Care Operation" (Nov. 19) states that construction workers are attempting to avoid "nests of the least tern." Note that the least tern nests here from April to August and migrates southward thereafter. A least tern nest is merely a depression in the sand; no nests are currently present.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1986 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
A federal grand jury in San Diego is attempting to determine whether Chula Vista officials committed criminal violations of the Endangered Species Act when they erected a fence in a bird nesting ground near the bayfront area the city wants to develop. The grand jury has subpoenaed all city records concerning the least tern and the Chula Vista bayfront extending back to 1980, City Atty. Tom Harron said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1990 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It doesn't look like much--a stretch of sand, shells and scraggly, gray-green strands of beach primrose. But these 7 1/2 acres just north of the Santa Ana River are a prime nesting ground for the California least tern, a gull-like bird that is on both state and federal endangered species lists. For 15 years, this swath of beach has been a preserve for the least tern. Lately, however, it looks more like a construction zone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2004 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
Where have all the least terns gone? Scanning the white sand at Ormond Beach, where the endangered shorebirds traditionally nest in abundance, Al Sanders thinks he knows. The local Sierra Club point man suspects they've been driven from their breeding grounds by motorized paragliders that have taken to the skies above the Oxnard preserve, tucked into one of Southern California's largest seaside wetlands.
NEWS
December 18, 1990
Description: White overall with black crown, nape and eyeline. The bill is orangish-yellow with black tip; legs are also orangish-yellow. Black feathers edging wings are predominant in flight. Tail is short and deeply forked. This is the smallest North American tern. Length: 9 inches. Habitat: Prefers open, flat beaches and shallow water of rivers and lakes. Diet: Aquatic insects, shrimp, small fish and eggs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2008 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
Most members of the Dorsey High School Global Warriors had never heard of the California least tern when it nested last spring on a breezy beach near Marina del Rey. Yet like seasoned conservation biologists, the Warriors reeled off facts Saturday as they wrestled invading Cakile maritima from the sands where the rare seabird is due to return in April. "We haven't seen them personally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2004 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
Where have all the least terns gone? Scanning the white sand at Ormond Beach, where the endangered shorebirds traditionally nest in abundance, Al Sanders thinks he knows. The local Sierra Club point man suspects they've been driven from their breeding grounds by motorized paragliders that have taken to the skies above the Oxnard preserve, tucked into one of Southern California's largest seaside wetlands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Sauer sits in a folding chair at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station for four hours every Friday morning, peering at the sky in search of predators on the prowl. Sauer is a volunteer, but he takes his guard duty seriously. The Huntington Beach retiree, along with a handful of others who shoo away ravens, hawks and other raptors, is playing a part in the effort to save the California least tern from extinction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1999
The Ventura Audubon Society recently constructed an enclosure near the Santa Clara River estuary as a protected place for the endangered least terns to make their nests. At this time of year, many other shorebirds nest in the estuary, including American avocets, black-necked stilts, killdeer, snowy plovers, mallards and several species of herons. Thus the estuary has been declared a continentally important bird area by the American Bird Conservancy. Please refrain from taking dogs past the fenced tern area for the duration of the shorebird breeding season (through Aug. 1)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1996 | JASON TERADA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A diligent monitoring program by wildlife experts and environmental advocates is credited with protecting the fragile nesting area of an endangered shorebird at Oxnard's Ormond Beach over the long Fourth of July weekend. In the past, a deluge of holiday beach goers has destroyed or otherwise disturbed a summer nesting colony of the California least tern.
NEWS
November 21, 1994 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were weekly fixtures throughout the summer, during the sea bird mating season at the Bolsa Chica Ecological Preserve. Wearing rubber boots and sporting binoculars, the team of graduate students tromped through the marshes, looking for bits of half-eaten fish discarded by the birds. Jacqueline Wilson said she was willing to do it for science and to make a contribution to the local ecology. She and her colleague from Cal State Fullerton are helping to conduct a study funded by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1986 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. attorney's office has quietly folded its investigation of charges that Chula Vista officials might have violated the federal Endangered Species Act when they put up a fence in a bird nesting ground near the bayfront area the city wants to develop. Meanwhile, city officials have agreed to repair and reconstruct the fence in a manner acceptable to federal wildlife officials, and to make the area hospitable for the least terns that nest there every spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1990 | NANCY RAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Endangered least terns were turned out of their designated nesting area on the Del Mar Fairgrounds last weekend to make way for more parking when the annual county fair opens Friday. The eviction, "begun on late Friday afternoon, after offices were closed and there could be no phone communication," according to Del Mar Mayor Jan McMillan, caught city officials off-guard when a barrage of calls from irate constituents came in.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An experimental breeding colony for the California least tern at south Dockweiler State Beach can be shut down, but county officials have six months to help biologists find an alternative site for the endangered birds, coastal authorities ruled last week. The California Coastal Commission's decision came as a disappointment to biologist Patricia Herron Baird, who set up the breeding ground last year and didn't want to give up the project until county officials had found her an alternative site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1993 | JANET RAE-DUPREE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California least tern, it seems, just can't win. A wisp of a bird weighing less than a parakeet, the least tern was disappearing at such a rapid clip it made the government's first endangered species list in 1973. Now it's being characterized by the Federal Aviation Administration and the city's Department of Airports as a serious threat to the scores of jumbo jets that roar out of Los Angeles International Airport each day.
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