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Leave It To Beaver Movie

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sporting Cub Scout uniforms and plaid shirts, more than 1,000 boys between 7 and 18 lined up outside Universal Studios over the weekend to audition for eight roles in a new movie based on the 1950s sitcom "Leave It to Beaver." Los Angeles was the last stop in Universal's nationwide search for the new Beaver as well as brother Wally and pals such as Lumpy Rutherford and Eddie Haskell.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sporting Cub Scout uniforms and plaid shirts, more than 1,000 boys between 7 and 18 lined up outside Universal Studios over the weekend to audition for eight roles in a new movie based on the 1950s sitcom "Leave It to Beaver." Los Angeles was the last stop in Universal's nationwide search for the new Beaver as well as brother Wally and pals such as Lumpy Rutherford and Eddie Haskell.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sporting Cub Scout uniforms and plaid shirts, more than 1,000 freckle-faced boys between 7 and 18 lined up outside Universal Studios on Saturday morning to audition for eight male roles in a new movie based on the 1950s sitcom "Leave It to Beaver." Los Angeles was the last stop in Universal's nationwide search for the new Beaver as well as brother Wally and such pals as Lumpy Rutherford and Eddie Haskell.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1997 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The year 1997 was one in which Hollywood wondered if "Titanic" would end up underwater. The courtroom showdown between Jeffrey Katzenberg and Disney chief Michael Eisner was spliced out of the drama. And Seagram chief Edgar Bronfman Jr. abruptly changed the channel on plans for his freshly acquired USA Network by turning over the keys to media mogul Barry Diller. 1. How much do you remember?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 10:30 a.m. in the lush and wooded southern rim of the San Fernando Valley, and the eight happiest ducks in the city were looking mighty hungry. Arrayed in a floating chow line on a pond shaded by towering cedars, the fat, tawny mallards ignored stale offerings of Trader Joe's honey-wheat bread, and one after another dipped under water for the real thing: fresh bluegill. "How long can they stay under there?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2006 | Carla Hall, Times Staff Writer
IT'S been decades since movie studios had movie stars on contract. And you're as likely to stumble across movie filming on a downtown L.A. street as on the Universal Studios back lot these days. But the studios still have that special feel of a gated village of the privileged, sprinkled with producers' personal parking spaces, dotted with streets named for directors and stars and charged with a frisson of excitement.
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