Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLebanon Currency
IN THE NEWS

Lebanon Currency

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 28, 1987
About 500 protesters angered by the plunging Lebanese pound smashed currency exchange windows, burned tires and threatened to storm the Central Bank in Beirut before troops fired into the air to disperse them. The protesters shouted "We are hungry; we want to eat!" and "Down with the dollar!" in a spontaneous demonstration after the Lebanese pound sunk to an all-time low of 300 to the U.S. dollar.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 29, 1987 | Associated Press
Rioters including children and militia gunmen smashed windows of supermarkets and money exchanges in Shia Muslim slums Friday, the second day of protest against soaring prices in Lebanon. Rioters carrying automatic rifles and rocket-propelled grenades joined others in setting tires ablaze on the highway to Beirut airport, blocking traffic for four hours. Most of the attacks were in the Ghobeiry and Bir Hassan districts near the highway in south Beirut.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | United Press International
An angry customer shot a bank teller in a South Beirut neighborhood Friday after an argument over currency rates, but the wounded man fired back, killing his assailant, a police source said. Both men, the source said, were relatives of Shia Amal militia officials. Police said the argument broke out when the customer demanded a better exchange rate for the dollars he wanted to convert into Lebanese currency.
NEWS
August 28, 1987
About 500 protesters angered by the plunging Lebanese pound smashed currency exchange windows, burned tires and threatened to storm the Central Bank in Beirut before troops fired into the air to disperse them. The protesters shouted "We are hungry; we want to eat!" and "Down with the dollar!" in a spontaneous demonstration after the Lebanese pound sunk to an all-time low of 300 to the U.S. dollar.
NEWS
August 29, 1987 | Associated Press
Rioters including children and militia gunmen smashed windows of supermarkets and money exchanges in Shia Muslim slums Friday, the second day of protest against soaring prices in Lebanon. Rioters carrying automatic rifles and rocket-propelled grenades joined others in setting tires ablaze on the highway to Beirut airport, blocking traffic for four hours. Most of the attacks were in the Ghobeiry and Bir Hassan districts near the highway in south Beirut.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
They emerge from their homes at dawn, when the neighbors are still asleep but there is enough light to forage through the garbage. Mostly elderly, the newest members of Lebanon's scavenger army are surprisingly well dressed, Beirut residents say. These aren't poor refugees picking out a living in strange neighborhoods, but former members of the middle class who can no longer afford to eat. They rise in the dark because they are still too proud to scavenge in broad daylight.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A young Lebanese entrepreneur has the perfect gift for the man or woman who has everything: "Civil War," the board game. Naji Tueini, 32, relied on his experience as a Lebanese in designing the game, which he calls his revenge on reality. Unlike Lebanon's civil war, now well into its 14th year, the game can be played in an hour and a half. The winner, according to the instructions, is "the most unscrupulous." In the game, players take part as militias.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | United Press International
An angry customer shot a bank teller in a South Beirut neighborhood Friday after an argument over currency rates, but the wounded man fired back, killing his assailant, a police source said. Both men, the source said, were relatives of Shia Amal militia officials. Police said the argument broke out when the customer demanded a better exchange rate for the dollars he wanted to convert into Lebanese currency.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
They emerge from their homes at dawn, when the neighbors are still asleep but there is enough light to forage through the garbage. Mostly elderly, the newest members of Lebanon's scavenger army are surprisingly well dressed, Beirut residents say. These aren't poor refugees picking out a living in strange neighborhoods, but former members of the middle class who can no longer afford to eat. They rise in the dark because they are still too proud to scavenge in broad daylight.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|