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July 1, 1991 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ramzi's parents fidget nervously, reassuring each other that their son has passed his exams. Eyeing the sealed envelopes that contain the results, they are among hundreds of parents who will happily hand over $2,000 if the letter begins: I am happy to inform you. . .. Ramzi and 95 other 3-year-olds are competing for 60 slots in the nursery section at the American Community School in Beirut.
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NEWS
July 1, 1991 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ramzi's parents fidget nervously, reassuring each other that their son has passed his exams. Eyeing the sealed envelopes that contain the results, they are among hundreds of parents who will happily hand over $2,000 if the letter begins: I am happy to inform you. . .. Ramzi and 95 other 3-year-olds are competing for 60 slots in the nursery section at the American Community School in Beirut.
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WORLD
August 1, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
LEBANON * A disgruntled clerk at Lebanon's Education Ministry opened fire with an assault rifle, killing eight colleagues before he was caught. He was charged with murder. The attack raised fears of sectarian violence because the suspect, Ahmed Mansour, is Muslim and most of those slain were Christians. But officials said he was angry that he had been asked to repay a $12,000 loan from the ministry.
NEWS
April 23, 1986 | NORA BOUSTANY, The Washington Post
In a scene that captured both the chaos and pathos of this divided city, 10 tearful Americans were evacuated from Muslim West Beirut on Tuesday to the relative safety of the city's Christian sector. They left amid a frantic rush of speeding jeeps crammed with nervous Druze militiamen holding up pistols and submachine guns as they escorted the Americans to East Beirut. About 20 Americans remained in the Muslim sector. Militiamen guarding the blocked-off and deserted former U.S.
NEWS
May 18, 1986 | ED BLANCHE, Associated Press
The exodus of Western professors and teachers from the violence of West Beirut has plunged Lebanon's educational system, once the envy of the Arab world, into deep crisis. Colleges are often at the mercy of extremists and gun-toting students. On May 9, the remaining faculty at the American University of Beirut voted to suspend classes until a kidnaped professor is released.
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