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Lebanon Government Officials

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November 30, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of Syrian tanks, together with troops and supply trucks, moved into position around the Christian enclave in Beirut, while the largest of Lebanon's Christian militias threw its support behind Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun, the beleaguered Christian army commander. The decision by the militia group known as the Lebanese Forces to back Aoun with its 6,000 soldiers caused fear on both sides that the bloodiest confrontation of the nation's 14-year-old civil war lies just ahead.
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NEWS
September 5, 2000 | Reuters
Billionaire businessman Rafik Hariri moved a step closer to becoming Lebanon's next prime minister Monday after final election results showed that he and his allies had won about a third of the seats in parliament. Hariri, a former prime minister, won 22% of the votes in Beirut in the second round of Lebanon's parliamentary elections Sunday. He and candidates running on his ticket won all 19 seats in the capital. The new assembly will meet Oct.
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NEWS
July 31, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Lebanese President Amin Gemayel ended about 12 years of self-exile in Paris and returned to his homeland. After taking office in 1982, Gemayel struck an alliance with the U.S. against Syrian influence, backing an ill-fated multinational peacekeeping mission that later collapsed. He left for France at the end of his term in 1988. He returned home briefly in 1992 but left after receiving threats.
NEWS
July 31, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Lebanese President Amin Gemayel ended about 12 years of self-exile in Paris and returned to his homeland. After taking office in 1982, Gemayel struck an alliance with the U.S. against Syrian influence, backing an ill-fated multinational peacekeeping mission that later collapsed. He left for France at the end of his term in 1988. He returned home briefly in 1992 but left after receiving threats.
NEWS
May 22, 1995 | Associated Press
Rafik Hariri was reappointed as Lebanon's prime minister Sunday, two days after he resigned, after Syria intervened on his behalf. President Elias Hrawi called on Hariri to form a new Cabinet after consulting most of the National Assembly's 128 members on their choice of premier. Hariri's resignation on Friday was seen as a maneuver to oust Cabinet ministers hindering his plan to rebuild Lebanon.
NEWS
December 6, 1994 | Associated Press
At Syria's urging, Prime Minister Rafik Hariri agreed Monday to stay in power, defusing the worst political crisis in Lebanon since civil war ended four years ago. The decision followed 2 1/2 hours of talks with President Hafez Assad of Syria and underscored his control over Lebanon. Political corruption scandals and Cabinet rifts pushed Hariri to resign Thursday. But aides, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Monday that he would return home to resume his duties.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
Lebanese rushed Friday to convert their savings from dollars into Lebanese pounds, buoyed by expectations that a billionaire appointed to be prime minister will revive Lebanon's war-shattered economy. Rafik Hariri, named to the post Thursday, began consulting with former heads of government about the makeup of a new Cabinet that he is expected to announce next week. Hariri, 49, built much of his $2.5-billion fortune in Saudi Arabia and enjoys a tight friendship with the Saudi royal family.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lebanon's worst economic crisis in its 48 years of independence resulted in the resignation of its prime minister Wednesday. "I have resigned to save the country," Omar Karami announced after a three-hour meeting with President Elias Hrawi. The resignation is expected to quell the angry reaction to the near-collapse of the country's currency and inflation that has driven merchants to switch to dollar pricing.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | From Reuters
Lebanese Defense Minister Michel Murr narrowly escaped assassination Wednesday when a car bomb blasted his motorcade, killing eight people and wounding 38. An estimated 132 pounds of explosives packed into a Mercedes were detonated by remote control as Murr's heavily guarded convoy passed on the way to a Cabinet session, military sources reported. The dead included one of the minister's Lebanese army bodyguards and a child. Murr, who is also deputy prime minister, was among the injured.
NEWS
October 16, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With unanimous approval in parliament, Lebanon's popular army commander was elected president Thursday. But the most important vote had already been cast--by Syrian President Hafez Assad. Syria exercises an unofficial, though universally recognized, suzerainty over Lebanon. And Assad gave Gen. Emile Lahoud the nod last week from Damascus.
NEWS
May 22, 1995 | Associated Press
Rafik Hariri was reappointed as Lebanon's prime minister Sunday, two days after he resigned, after Syria intervened on his behalf. President Elias Hrawi called on Hariri to form a new Cabinet after consulting most of the National Assembly's 128 members on their choice of premier. Hariri's resignation on Friday was seen as a maneuver to oust Cabinet ministers hindering his plan to rebuild Lebanon.
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | Times Wire Services
Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri submitted his resignation Friday, but he is expected to return at the head of a more united government. Official sources, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Hariri, a 50-year-old billionaire, submitted his Cabinet's resignation in an apparent bid to enable him to form a government more supportive of his $18-billion reconstruction program.
NEWS
December 6, 1994 | Associated Press
At Syria's urging, Prime Minister Rafik Hariri agreed Monday to stay in power, defusing the worst political crisis in Lebanon since civil war ended four years ago. The decision followed 2 1/2 hours of talks with President Hafez Assad of Syria and underscored his control over Lebanon. Political corruption scandals and Cabinet rifts pushed Hariri to resign Thursday. But aides, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Monday that he would return home to resume his duties.
NEWS
December 3, 1994 | KIM MURPHY and MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lebanon's billionaire prime minister, Rafik Hariri, confirmed Friday that he is abandoning his massive plan for reconstruction of the war-torn nation and stepping down amid widespread charges of corruption and political standoffs that have deadlocked his government.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Rafik Hariri's tinted-glass, armored Mercedes and its entourage move out from behind the blast-resistant walls of his villa and into the streets of Beirut, and simultaneously three decoy limousines begin coursing through the city. Is Hariri behind door No. 1? Door No. 2?
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Druze warlord Walid Jumblatt resigned his post as minister-without-portfolio, dealing a blow to the half-Muslim, half-Christian government formed in Beirut to steer Lebanon out of civil war. The sudden resignation means the 30-seat Cabinet now lacks two of the three major militia leaders Prime Minister Omar Karami had sought to attract to the national reconciliation government he formed on Dec. 24.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
Lebanese rushed Friday to convert their savings from dollars into Lebanese pounds, buoyed by expectations that a billionaire appointed to be prime minister will revive Lebanon's war-shattered economy. Rafik Hariri, named to the post Thursday, began consulting with former heads of government about the makeup of a new Cabinet that he is expected to announce next week. Hariri, 49, built much of his $2.5-billion fortune in Saudi Arabia and enjoys a tight friendship with the Saudi royal family.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | Associated Press
Billionaire Rafik Hariri was named prime minister Thursday, igniting hopes that his wealth, drive and connections would lead war-shattered Lebanon out of economic distress. Many Lebanese believe that Hariri's business savvy can help him get things done in politics. The Lebanese pound rose to 2,000 to the dollar, 205 pounds higher than its Wednesday close, after Hariri had emerged as the likely head of the new government.
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