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NEWS
March 31, 1992 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Under a bare light bulb in a village coffee house in southern Lebanon, the farmer unwrapped his treasure, holding his breath as the light caught the delicate turquoise glass. It was a Phoenician vessel, in perfect condition, at least 18 centuries old and turned up in his field by the blade of his plow. He was looking for a buyer for this piece of his country's heritage, specifically, for a foreigner so he could cut out the middleman and get top dollar.
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NEWS
March 31, 1992 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Under a bare light bulb in a village coffee house in southern Lebanon, the farmer unwrapped his treasure, holding his breath as the light caught the delicate turquoise glass. It was a Phoenician vessel, in perfect condition, at least 18 centuries old and turned up in his field by the blade of his plow. He was looking for a buyer for this piece of his country's heritage, specifically, for a foreigner so he could cut out the middleman and get top dollar.
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NEWS
June 9, 1992 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Imagine telling an IRS agent to go to hell. Well, in this Mediterranean taxpayers' heaven, Lebanese tax collectors hear it all the time. Hiding from the Internal Revenue Service? Welcome to the perfect tax haven. No chance they'll catch up with you here. Lebanon's tax collectors estimate that about 75% of the population hasn't paid taxes since the beginning of the civil war in 1975.
WORLD
August 10, 2003 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
Riad Turk knows something about freedom. The grandfather of this country's opposition, Turk spent more than two decades as a political prisoner, most of it in solitary confinement. He was tortured and beaten repeatedly, once slipping into a coma that lasted 25 days. Released late last year, Turk, who is in his early 70s, immediately renewed his efforts to win more freedom from Syria's repressive dictatorship.
WORLD
December 20, 2006 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
In these days of fear and distrust in Lebanon, there may be no man who inspires more venom than Gen. Michel Aoun. Since returning from 15 years of exile to the joyful cheers of his followers last year, the Christian leader known simply as "the General" has frayed this fragile country's intricate network of allegiances. First he formed a surprising political alliance with Hezbollah. Then he sent his followers into the streets for massive antigovernment demonstrations.
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