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NEWS
October 21, 1987
About 60,000 teachers launched an indefinite strike across Lebanon to press demands for higher wages, shutting down schools for about 600,000 pupils, education officials said. The strike closed about 2,250 state and private schools. The teachers demanded pay reviews every three months as well as improved medical and travel benefits. Earlier this month, the government doubled the minimum wage, retroactive to July 1, taking the basic minimum from $11.30 a month to $22.
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NEWS
October 21, 1987
About 60,000 teachers launched an indefinite strike across Lebanon to press demands for higher wages, shutting down schools for about 600,000 pupils, education officials said. The strike closed about 2,250 state and private schools. The teachers demanded pay reviews every three months as well as improved medical and travel benefits. Earlier this month, the government doubled the minimum wage, retroactive to July 1, taking the basic minimum from $11.30 a month to $22.
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NEWS
May 18, 1986 | ED BLANCHE, Associated Press
The exodus of Western professors and teachers from the violence of West Beirut has plunged Lebanon's educational system, once the envy of the Arab world, into deep crisis. Colleges are often at the mercy of extremists and gun-toting students. On May 9, the remaining faculty at the American University of Beirut voted to suspend classes until a kidnaped professor is released.
NEWS
May 18, 1986 | ED BLANCHE, Associated Press
The exodus of Western professors and teachers from the violence of West Beirut has plunged Lebanon's educational system, once the envy of the Arab world, into deep crisis. Colleges are often at the mercy of extremists and gun-toting students. On May 9, the remaining faculty at the American University of Beirut voted to suspend classes until a kidnaped professor is released.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Lebanese Muslims and Christians closed their shops and schools Tuesday in a nationwide strike to express their outrage at the assassination of Premier Rashid Karami. The minister of education, Salim Hoss, who is a Sunni Muslim as Karami was, agreed Tuesday to serve as premier for an interim period. President Amin Gemayel appointed Hoss to the post only hours after Karami was killed by a bomb that exploded on board his helicopter Monday.
NEWS
October 10, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Police said Monday that two Red Cross officials abducted last week are being held by radical Palestinian guerrillas led by terrorist mastermind Abu Nidal. Abu Nidal's group has denied taking part in the kidnapings. "We have established that Abu Nidal's men carried out the abduction. We believe the hostages are held in a base east of Sidon," said a police spokesman, who declined to be identified.
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