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Lebanon Tourism

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WORLD
September 26, 2009 | Meris Lutz
It was a good summer for Georges Boustany. His popular upscale beach club, Lazy B, thrived as record numbers of visitors flocked to Lebanon's famed sandy coast for what officials are calling the country's most successful tourist season ever. But the influx has so strained the nation's war-weakened infrastructure that in late August, Lazy B was getting only about 12 hours of electricity a day, and even then the voltage was so low that Boustany was forced to augment it with a diesel-fueled generator.
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WORLD
September 26, 2009 | Meris Lutz
It was a good summer for Georges Boustany. His popular upscale beach club, Lazy B, thrived as record numbers of visitors flocked to Lebanon's famed sandy coast for what officials are calling the country's most successful tourist season ever. But the influx has so strained the nation's war-weakened infrastructure that in late August, Lazy B was getting only about 12 hours of electricity a day, and even then the voltage was so low that Boustany was forced to augment it with a diesel-fueled generator.
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TRAVEL
March 29, 2009 | Raed Rafei, Associated Press; Reuters News; Australian Associated Press
1 Lebanon After years of instability, Lebanon is getting its groove back. Although the U.S. State Department maintains a travel warning, which advises Americans to avoid Lebanon because of safety and security concerns, a political agreement last year has restored calm. Foreign tourists have been flocking back to the Mideast country's pine-covered mountains, fancy Mediterranean beach clubs and buzzing night life. About 1.3 million visited last year, up 30% from 2007, government officials said.
TRAVEL
March 29, 2009 | Raed Rafei, Associated Press; Reuters News; Australian Associated Press
1 Lebanon After years of instability, Lebanon is getting its groove back. Although the U.S. State Department maintains a travel warning, which advises Americans to avoid Lebanon because of safety and security concerns, a political agreement last year has restored calm. Foreign tourists have been flocking back to the Mideast country's pine-covered mountains, fancy Mediterranean beach clubs and buzzing night life. About 1.3 million visited last year, up 30% from 2007, government officials said.
NEWS
July 10, 1985 | United Press International
Leaders of Lebanon's Sunni and Shia Muslim and Druze communities Tuesday issued sweeping proposals to rewrite the constitution and dismantle all militias in Beirut while fierce battles swept through the city of Tripoli. Lebanese Premier Rashid Karami issued a statement at dawn on a "new national plan" drawn up by 12 Lebanese delegates during an 11-hour meeting in the Syrian capital of Damascus on Monday and Tuesday.
WORLD
August 13, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
When Lebanon breaks, Fadl Chalak gets called to fix it. Over the years, he's seen it all: the destroyed roads and bridges, the displaced families, the blown-up buildings. Still, he says, nothing in three decades of war and recovery prepared him for the ferocity of Israel's month-long bombing campaign.
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