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NEWS
November 24, 1990 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Lebanese Vespa salesman is smiling. He has already sold six motor scooters, and it's only early afternoon. The snarled traffic in front of his shop is a delight to his eyes. His sales pitch is music to the ears of his customers: "On this scooter you can get from here to the other side in 15 minutes. Vespas hardly use any gas. And these fenders--if someone opens a car door and hits you, you won't be hurt."
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NEWS
November 24, 1990 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Lebanese Vespa salesman is smiling. He has already sold six motor scooters, and it's only early afternoon. The snarled traffic in front of his shop is a delight to his eyes. His sales pitch is music to the ears of his customers: "On this scooter you can get from here to the other side in 15 minutes. Vespas hardly use any gas. And these fenders--if someone opens a car door and hits you, you won't be hurt."
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NEWS
March 7, 1989
Christian-led troops imposed a blockade on Lebanon's pirate ports in a move that analysts said could renew civil war violence. Officials said that soldiers led by Christian army commander Michel Aoun took four patrol boats out to sea to stop freighters from docking at seven makeshift harbors run by rival militias. They said Aoun ordered the patrols as part of a campaign to close ports outside government control and thus stem the flow of Lebanon's dwindling wealth into militia purses.
NEWS
March 7, 1989
Christian-led troops imposed a blockade on Lebanon's pirate ports in a move that analysts said could renew civil war violence. Officials said that soldiers led by Christian army commander Michel Aoun took four patrol boats out to sea to stop freighters from docking at seven makeshift harbors run by rival militias. They said Aoun ordered the patrols as part of a campaign to close ports outside government control and thus stem the flow of Lebanon's dwindling wealth into militia purses.
NEWS
May 11, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Beirut's international airport reopened Sunday after being closed by the threat of militia violence for three months. An airliner bearing the red-and-white markings of Lebanon's national carrier, Middle East Airlines, arrived at the seaside airport south of Beirut to cheers from ground personnel, according to reports from the Lebanese capital.
WORLD
August 28, 2006 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
The leader of the Hezbollah militia said Sunday that he never would have ordered the kidnapping of two Israeli soldiers that led Israel to declare war had he known the consequences for Lebanon.
NEWS
May 11, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Beirut's international airport reopened Sunday after being closed by the threat of militia violence for three months. An airliner bearing the red-and-white markings of Lebanon's national carrier, Middle East Airlines, arrived at the seaside airport south of Beirut to cheers from ground personnel, according to reports from the Lebanese capital.
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