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Lech Walesa

NEWS
November 1, 1994 | Dean E. Murphy
W ith a year to go before the Polish presidential elections, President Lech Walesa has kicked into a campaign mode. Ranked in recent popularity polls below former Polish Communist boss Gen.
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NEWS
October 29, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a moment it looked like a flashback from the 1980s, a dramatic televised scene of Poland's struggle to overthrow communism, featuring top players in the Solidarity reform movement. Solidarity strategist Bronislaw Geremek issued a stern warning about the sanctity of democracy. Solidarity journalist Tadeusz Mazowiecki lectured about civilian control of the military. And Solidarity activist Wladyslaw Frasyniuk accused the Polish president of authoritarian tendencies.
NEWS
September 3, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Europe's strictest abortion laws survived a strenuous challenge Friday when Polish lawmakers failed to override a presidential veto of legislation that would have made abortions more readily available. The vote was a victory for President Lech Walesa, and it staved off a high-stakes power struggle between the staunchly antiabortion president and the governing coalition, which is led by former Communists who favor easing abortion restrictions.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Lech Walesa called Wednesday for the removal of the new head of Poland's civilian intelligence service, saying his history as a top Communist-era spy could sour relations with the West. Walesa praised the "professionalism and many years of experience" of Marian Zacharski, who was appointed to the post Monday, but said his exploits as a Soviet Bloc spy overshadowed his credentials.
NEWS
August 6, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has never been possible for Polish President Lech Walesa to separate his public and private lives, despite a longstanding tradition in Poland of doing so. As a Solidarity leader in the 1980s, his Gdansk apartment was also union headquarters, where journalists and political activists shared the same cramped space with Walesa, his wife and their eight children. During his internment in 1982, his wife, Danuta, was thrust into the role of chief spokesperson. A year later, Danuta and the Walesas' eldest son, Bogdan, traveled to Norway to accept the Nobel Peace Prize because Walesa was afraid he would not be allowed to return to Poland if he left to collect the prize himself.
NEWS
September 21, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Lech Walesa took a gamble four months ago when he dissolved the stormy Polish Parliament and called for new elections, only the second in post-Communist Poland. "The decisive voice returns to you, the people," he declared in a televised address at the time. "Let the nation speak. Let it choose those whom it trusts." The nation spoke on Sunday, but it did not say what Walesa expected to hear.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
President Lech Walesa dissolved Poland's first democratically elected Parliament on Saturday, a day after lawmakers brought down the government in a no-confidence vote. He refused to accept the resignation of Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka, deciding instead to disband the Parliament where 20-odd bickering parties have made forming a stable government impossible. Walesa must schedule elections within three or four months, two years early.
NEWS
May 29, 1993 | From Associated Press
President Lech Walesa weighed whether to dissolve Poland's first democratically elected Parliament after a no-confidence vote brought down the government Friday. Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka's year-old centrist government fell victim to the political jousting that has plagued Parliament's 20-odd parties. The vote plunged Poland into political chaos that appeared likely to delay economic reforms and damage its international prestige.
BOOKS
September 27, 1992 | ROGER BOYES, Boyes, East Europe correspondent of the London Times since 1981, is completing a biography of Lech Walesa for Times Books (a subsidiary of Random House) in New York and Secker and Warburg in London
The original English use of the word "revolution"--before it was expropriated by American and French rebels--suggests a turning back, a rotation, the movement of a wheel to its earlier position. Poland's Solidarity revolution may have been just such a shift, as conservative as it was radical. Those flushed, overalled strikers in August 1980 were not only rejecting a corrupt version of communism, they were clamoring for the rebirth of history suppressed during five decades of totalitarian rule.
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