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BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
It's the monetary policy version of "Point/Counterpoint. " Leading Federal Reserve critic Peter Schiff will give his own lecture Thursday in Washington to counter a four-lecture series on the financial crisis by Fed Chairman Ben S. Bernanke that wraps up earlier in the day. Schiff, president of investment firm Euro Pacific Capital, will give his talk -- "The Fed Unspun: The Other Side of the Story" -- at the Reason Foundation, a free-market think...
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BUSINESS
April 16, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Marc's daughter is attending college in Michigan. She's also deaf. Sign-language interpreters have been provided for classes, but Marc wants to know if there's a more high-tech solution. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions Isn't there an app for this? I put that question to the Hearing Loss Assn. of America. For its answer, check out today's Ask Laz video. If you have a consumer question, email me at asklaz@latimes.com or contact me via Twitter @Davidlaz .    
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NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Caitlin Keller
This season's Cooking and Science lecture series at Harvard is coming to a close with just three lectures left. Don't miss Nathan Myhrvold, author of " Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking " -- the $625 six-volume set -- on Nov. 19; David Chang of Momofuku on Nov. 26; and El Bulli Foundation 's Ferran Adriá on Dec. 3. Watch the remaining lectures live streaming on Mondays at 7 p.m. EST. Lectures are also available on...
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON -- For over two hours, Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. and the House Judiciary Committee were getting along unusually well. Even Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Vista), Holder's arch-nemesis in Congress, pursued a relatively tame line of questioning. And Holder, as counseled by his advisors, seemed to be trying to avoid confrontation. But when Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas), while pressing Holder for some documents, made an apparently offhand comment concerning the vote in 2012 to hold the attorney general in contempt of Congress, Holder bristled.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Marc's daughter is attending college in Michigan. She's also deaf. Sign-language interpreters have been provided for classes, but Marc wants to know if there's a more high-tech solution. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions Isn't there an app for this? I put that question to the Hearing Loss Assn. of America. For its answer, check out today's Ask Laz video. If you have a consumer question, email me at asklaz@latimes.com or contact me via Twitter @Davidlaz .    
NEWS
April 12, 1987
I wish you to know that I think very highly of Gerald Faris' story, "Testy Prof. Wonderful Sees Only Darkness in Intellectual Decay," (Times, April 5). It needs a slight emendation; you spoke of my last lecture in Australia as being the 1,459th. This suggests that I have given only 1,459 lectures. This is cruelty to my history. It is 1,459 lectures outside the classroom and outside of my TV programs around the world. I have given over 20,000 lectures in the classroom and some 2,000 television programs around the world on my demonstrations.
NEWS
July 30, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
He lectured Oliver L. North, pestered John M. Poindexter and challenged Richard V. Secord. And Wednesday, as the long-running Iran- contra hearings labored tediously toward an end, Sen. George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) performed the congressional equivalent of a strip search on the attorney general of the United States. The senator, a former district attorney and federal judge, got Atty. Gen.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2011 | By Oliver Gettell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Going out on a Friday night usually means a quest for mindless fun — unless, that is, the quest leads to the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County's popular First Fridays series, where the fun is decidedly more mindful. The series, which concludes its season Friday, combines museum tours and lectures with live rock bands and DJs, transforming a grade-schooler's favorite field-trip destination into a one-stop night life and culture spot. Su Oh, the director of programs at the museum, described First Fridays as "a place where you can get your intellectual content, your social interaction and your art content.
WORLD
September 27, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
In a region where Confucian thinking about seniority still holds sway, where political life generally begins at 50, it isn’t easy to sell the public on a twentysomething who has never held a real job. So North Korean propagandists are hard at work spinning Kim Jong Eun’s youth into an asset, trying to convince a wary public that the youngest son of leader Kim Jong Il will bring the country lurching toward modernity. The ruling Workers’ Party is convening a rare congress on Tuesday in Pyongyang to name the next generation of leadership.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Let it not be said that San Jose State University hasn't taught the world a valuable lesson in the promises and pitfalls of the fancy new craze for online university learning. The Cal State University campus set itself up as a pioneer in the field in January, when it announced plans to enroll up to 300 students in three introductory online courses; the fee would be $150, a deep discount from the usual cost of more than $2,000. Gov. Jerry Brown, who had been pushing the state's public universities to embrace high-tech teaching modes, was on hand to mark what he called an "exciting moment in the intellectual history of our state and of our university.
TRAVEL
February 16, 2014
TRAVEL Workshop Angel Castellanos will present "Travel Smart," offering up-to-date info on sightseeing and travel planning, airport do's and don'ts, and packing tips and tricks. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday and 9 a.m. Saturday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220. MT. WHITNEY Workshop Interested in discovering what the highest peak in the lower 48 has to offer? Come to this class and learn the details of the permit process and how to get ready for your trip.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Susan Rasky, an award-winning congressional correspondent who mentored a generation of young political journalists as a senior lecturer at UC Berkeley, died Sunday at her home in El Cerrito, Calif. She was 61 and had breast cancer. A graduate of Los Angeles' Fairfax High School and an alumna of Berkeley, Rasky was a familiar sight at California political events, wrestling an armload of papers and trailing a gaggle of students, whom she nudged to join in news conferences and panel discussions.
OPINION
November 13, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Most bio-pics are made about somebodies - warriors, kings, artists. This was a bio-pic about a nobody who became a somebody during the Rwandan genocide, a bloody crossroads for a country with deep-seated ethnic frictions. In April 1994, Paul Rusesabagina was brevetted as general manager of the luxury hotel where he worked, and where more than 1,000 people had fled from the killing rampage. For more than two months, he managed to protect them from being slaughtered. Ten years later, the world saw "Hotel Rwanda.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"Lecture on Nothing," which is published in John Cage's "Silence," is a classic, studied and often recited. One of its much-quoted lines is "I have nothing to say and I am saying and that is poetry as I need it. " The conductor Robert Spano read the lecture at the 2006 Ojai Festival, as the director Peter Sellars once did at the Salzburg Festival, slowly savoring every instant. But what Cage called a composed lecture didn't always go down so easily. The composer first delivered the 40-minute lecture - which is structured like a piece of music, with pauses and repetitions - at the painter Robert Motherwell's 8th St. Artist's Club in Manhattan in 1950.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Young Guru has helped everyone from Jay Z to  Beyoncé to  Drake to Eminem to Kanye West shape their sounds. Now, the Grammy Award-nominated engineer-DJ-producer will shape minds at USC as an artist-in-residence for the coming academic year, the university announced Tuesday. The prolific engineer, born Gimel Keaton, will join the faculty of USC Thornton's Contemporary Music Division, where he will work with students in the popular music, music industry and music technology programs.  During his post at USC, he will be instrumental in helping the university develop a degree program in music production and will also lecture students studying hip-hop, electronic music, music industry and songwriting.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Let it not be said that San Jose State University hasn't taught the world a valuable lesson in the promises and pitfalls of the fancy new craze for online university learning. The Cal State University campus set itself up as a pioneer in the field in January, when it announced plans to enroll up to 300 students in three introductory online courses; the fee would be $150, a deep discount from the usual cost of more than $2,000. Gov. Jerry Brown, who had been pushing the state's public universities to embrace high-tech teaching modes, was on hand to mark what he called an "exciting moment in the intellectual history of our state and of our university.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2000 | Alex Katz, (714) 966-5977
A 12-foot, state-of-the-art telescope will be set up at Cypress Nature Park at 8 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is invited to gaze through the telescope and hear lectures on astronomy. The park is at 4201 Ball Road. Information: (714) 299-7680.
TRAVEL
May 5, 2013
HAWAII Movie Filmmaker Catherine Bauknight will present "Hawaii: A Voice for Sovereignty," a documentary that raises awareness of issues that threaten the ancient and environmentally sustainable culture of native Hawaiians. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220. TRAVEL Jill Swaim will offer a look at Road Scholar and its lifelong learning and travel adventure groups. When, where: 6 p.m. Wednesday, Westwood Branch Library, 1246 Glendon Ave., Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Jane Engle
The 436-passenger American Queen, a steam-powered paddle wheeler built in 1995 for the now-defunct Delta Steamboat Co., was relaunched last year after a four-year absence. Designed to evoke the Mississippi floating palaces of the late 19th century, it offers a full schedule of trips on the Mississippi, Ohio and Tennessee rivers. If you crave culture, history and old-time entertainment, this may be your boat. Among its many themed itineraries are the nine-day “Age of Steam,” a roll up the river from New Orleans to Memphis, Tenn., focusing on cities and towns that flourished in the golden age of steamboats.
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