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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Susan King
Martin Scorsese is an Oscar-winning director, actor, producer, film historian and film preservationist. And now he can add lecturer to his resume. The director of such classics as "The Departed," 'Taxi Driver," "Raging Bull" and "GoodFellas" has been named the 42nd Jefferson Lecturer in the Humanities. The annual lecture, sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities, is considered the most prestigious honor the federal government can bestow for distinguished intellectual achievement in the humanities.
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NEWS
February 2, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
The Palm Springs Modernism Show may not begin until Feb. 14, but tickets are selling fast for many of the architecture tours during the related 11-day celebration of desert design. Already bought your tour tickets to Sunnylands and the William Cody glass house? Consider yourself lucky. Those events have sold out. But tickets are still available for selected tours as well as lectures and films , and the modern living, vintage car and vintage trailer expos . Limited tickets were released Friday for tours of the Frey House II, above, architect Albert Frey's home built high in the San Jacinto Mountains overlooking Palm Springs.
SPORTS
January 22, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Manti Te'o's imaginary girlfriend is back in the news. It seems the person tweeting from the fake Lennay Kekua Twitter account once lectured others on faking deaths. Deadspin.com shared numerous tweets sent from the Twitter account of Kekua. The Twitter account has been deleted, but Deadspin was able to recover nearly all of the tweets. What did Kekua tweet? Well, how about this one on Feb. 3, 2012: "I don't think joking around with people's deaths (celebrity or not) is funny.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
Poet and journalist Dana Goodyear perches on a swivel chair in the second-floor writing studio behind her Venice home, the windows cranked open to a gentle ocean breeze. Low rooftops and tall palm trees stretch to the horizon, and Goodyear points to an anomaly just across the alley - a faded surfboard tossed up and forgotten atop a neighbor's single-story house. Such juxtapositions appeal to Goodyear, a New Yorker magazine staff writer. And while the misplaced surfboard doesn't make an appearance in her new book of poems, "The Oracle of Hollywood Boulevard" (Norton, $25.95)
TRAVEL
January 2, 2013 | By Susan Spano
Every time I come to Santa Barbara, I find something new to like. Not exactly secrets, just favorite things, and I'm not talking about raindrops on roses, though they probably have those too in that golden town 90 miles up the coast from L.A. Here are some of my choices: A night on the town The popular, long-running UC Santa Barbara Arts & Lectures series ([805] 893-3535, http://www.artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu ) gets star billing on the town's cultural calendar, bringing Yo-Yo Ma, Joshua Bell and the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, the Geneva Ballet, new documentary films and talks by authors, journalists, actors and directors.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Caitlin Keller
Whether you are food-obsessed and like to marvel at still life paintings of fruits and vegetables or if lectures on food history and culture are your thing, here are some upcoming art-related food events around Los Angeles: FLORENTINE FAMILY LUNCH: On Sunday, the Getty Center will host a four-course luncheon at 12:30 p.m., fashioned after the traditional Italian family meal with platters of food to be shared. The lunch will feature Prosecco, music from Renaissance Florence and a tour of the " Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance " exhibition.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Caitlin Keller
This season's Cooking and Science lecture series at Harvard is coming to a close with just three lectures left. Don't miss Nathan Myhrvold, author of " Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking " -- the $625 six-volume set -- on Nov. 19; David Chang of Momofuku on Nov. 26; and El Bulli Foundation 's Ferran Adriá on Dec. 3. Watch the remaining lectures live streaming on Mondays at 7 p.m. EST. Lectures are also available on...
OPINION
November 6, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
On Wednesday at noon UCLA professor of French and Francophone Studies Jean-Louis Carron discusses the historical, social, political and cultural context of "Le Cuisinier François (The French Cook)" by Francois Pierre La Varenne. Its 1651 publication and a coinciding culinary revolution are considered to be the birth of modern French (i.e. western) gastronomy. Burgundian chef La Varenne broke with Italian traditions, which had upended medieval French cookery a century before, abandoning heavy spices of the Middle Ages for fresh herbs, maximizing the flavors of meat, and introducing new vegetables.
SPORTS
October 29, 2012 | By Gary Klein, Los Angeles Times
USC players have heard endless coaches' sermons about the evils of penalties. They've been bombarded with sideline and locker room rants about the topic, and game officials were summoned to practices in an effort to keep them on track. And still the Trojans reached double digits in penalties in a crushing defeat at Arizona on Saturday. "I'm open for any suggestions," Coach Lane Kiffin said after the game. "We've tried it all. " On Sunday, Kiffin ordered the Trojans to watch a video montage of every major penalty they committed this season.
OPINION
October 6, 2012
Re "Obama's foreign policy follies," Opinion, Oct. 2 Pinning criticism of George W. Bush's foreign policy coattails on the Obama donkey is a new one for Jonah Goldberg. Iraq's detente with Iran was predestined when Bush enabled the Shiite majority to rule. President Obama failed to openly support the Green Revolution in Iran after its presidential election in 2009 because that regime insisted the CIA was seeking another case of regime change, so Obama did not want to confirm the role of the CIA, as that would encourage a massacre of the Iranian dissidents.
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