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Lee A Iacocca

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BUSINESS
March 5, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Big Chrysler Investor Wants Lutz to Follow Iacocca: Chrysler Corp.'s second-largest stockholder is pushing the auto maker to name President Robert Lutz as Chairman Lee A. Iacocca's successor. "Our posture is that the company's working beautifully in a product sense, and that reflects directly on Lutz," said Charles Freeman, Wellington Management Co.'s senior vice president. Wellington Management owns 8.9% of Chrysler. California billionaire Kirk Kerkorian owns 9.8%.
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BUSINESS
July 7, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Chrysler Group is trying to complete an agreement with former Chairman Lee Iacocca to appear in commercials to promote the automaker's offer on an employee discount to all buyers. Actor Jason Alexander also will star in the commercials, uttering Iacocca's line, "If you can find a better car, buy it," a Chrysler spokesman said. Iacocca had used that line in 1980s television commercials that helped rescue the automaker, now a unit of DaimlerChrysler.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 1997 | (Reuters)
Lee Iacocca, the maverick businessman who twice pulled Chrysler Corp. back from the brink of bankruptcy, plans to return to the transportation business with a new venture to sell electric bicycles. Iacocca, who retired from Chrysler more than four years ago, is planning to form a company called EV Global Motors to sell light electric vehicles--including two-wheelers, three-wheelers and scooters--primarily in Asia.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1992 | Associated Press
Lee A. Iacocca told students at Johns Hopkins University that they will be forced to pay bills left by his generation. "My generation did something to yours that was never done to us or to any other generation," Iacocca said Thursday at a commencement speech. "We didn't pay our bills." Iacocca said today's graduates are saddled with a $4-trillion debt. Interest alone is 10 times what the government spent on education and twice that spent on poverty programs, he said.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1997 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca is quitting the board of a long-distance phone company that has been using his name to drum up business. Iacocca said through a spokeswoman Wednesday that he never gave Intercontinental Communications Long Distance of Delrey Beach, Fla., permission to use his name. The company, also known as ICLD, has been running ads in The Times and other newspapers with Iacocca's picture to attract recruits for its network marketing program.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1996 | From Reuters
Former Chrysler Corp. Chairman Lee Iacocca, shifting gears from motor oil to olive oil, is now taking aim at the nation's $1.8-billion market for nonbutter spreads. Wondering what to do with thousands of gallons of olive oil from his estate in Tuscany, Italy, Iacocca and his son-in-law hit upon the idea of developing a margarine using the oil, which studies have shown can help limit the harmful effects of cholesterol. Iacocca's Boston-based Nicola Corp.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chrysler Sues Iacocca: In its suit against its former chairman, Chrysler Corp. claims Lee Iacocca was still working as a consultant to the auto maker while he was giving secrets to dissident shareholder Kirk Kerkorian as Kerkorian was trying to wrest control of Chrysler. Iacocca played a part in the billionaire investor's failed attempt to take over Chrysler last spring. Iacocca is a paid consultant for Kerkorian's Tracinda Corp.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Lee A. Iacocca filed suit against Chrysler Corp. on Monday, claiming it acted unlawfully last July when denied his request in July to exercise millions of dollars in stock options earned while he was its chairman. "I deeply regret being forced to sue a company that I helped build and love very much," Iacocca said in a statement announcing the lawsuit, filed in Superior Court in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1995 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chrysler Corp. disclosed Thursday that it will not allow former Chairman Lee A. Iacocca to exercise lucrative stock options because of his involvement in Kirk Kerkorian's takeover efforts. Chrysler said it is taking the action because Iacocca violated provisions of its options plan by taking outside employment without the company's approval and acting in ways that "adversely affect the company."
BUSINESS
April 16, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
One of the weirder aspects of the Chrysler takeover bid launched last week by investor Kirk Kerkorian and Lee Iacocca, the company's former chairman, is that it seems to ignore the company itself--its needs and ambitious investment plans. And so, pushed by large egos and a destructive flaw in the U.S. financial system, the bid threatens Chrysler's future. The offer itself would loot the company treasury. Instead of focusing on ways to help Chrysler, Kerkorian proposes to finance part of his $20.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chrysler Corp. Friday said it hired three investment banking firms to evaluate the takeover bid made this week by financier Kirk Kerkorian, while former Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca sharply criticized his hand-picked successor at the nation's third-largest auto maker. Morgan Stanley & Co., Salomon Brothers and CS-First Boston will advise Chrysler on the $55-a-share offer from Kerkorian's Tracinda Corp., Chrysler spokesman Steven Harris said. The proposed deal has a value of $22.8 billion.
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