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Lee Bertha Pickett Allen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The circumstances of Earnest Pickett Jr.'s murder were like those of many other killings in Los Angeles. He was a good kid, a teen-ager minding his business when a stray bullet from a gang fight pierced his back one afternoon in 1984 as he was leaving Dorsey High School to pick up some equipment for baseball practice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The circumstances of Earnest Pickett Jr.'s murder were like those of many other killings in Los Angeles. He was a good kid, a teen-ager minding his business when a stray bullet from a gang fight pierced his back one afternoon in 1984 as he was leaving Dorsey High School to pick up some equipment for baseball practice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1997
A suspected gang member wanted in connection with three South Los Angeles homicides, including the 1984 shooting of a high school athlete, was arrested this week after a tip from a viewer of the television show "America's Most Wanted." Edwin Oswald Smith, 30, was arrested Wednesday at his home in Lancaster by homicide detectives from the Los Angeles Police Department, said South Bureau Det. Carolyn Flamenco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1998
A reputed gang member was sentenced Thursday to 32 years to life in prison for the 1984 shooting deaths of a gang rival and an honors student outside Dorsey High School. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge William Pounders sentenced Edwin Oswald Smith, 32, to serve 15 years to life in one killing, plus an additional two years for the use of a firearm, as the 1984-era sentencing rules allowed, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Joseph Esposito.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1989 | ELIZABETH J. MANN
The murder of Earnest Pickett Jr. should have been an open-and-shut case. Clusters of students were milling around Dorsey High School when Pickett, 17, a senior honors student, was shot on a busy street corner across from the school on Jan. 20, 1984. But more than five years later, Los Angeles police still lack the critical evidence they need--an eyewitness who will identify the killer or killers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been nearly 11 years since he died in the cross-fire of a gang war, and the dogeared clippings seem almost mundane: Earnest Pickett Jr., honor student and athlete, had been shot in full view of 300 classmates. And although everyone knew his killer, none dared tell. Oh, two homeboys were arrested. But after a while, they were let go. Insufficient evidence, the judge said. No witnesses would talk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1987 | HEIDI EVANS, Times Staff Writer
At first, explained Sidney Davis, when his son was murdered, there was only one kind of person he could talk to--someone who had lost a child. Then, said the 62-year-old engineer, "even that wasn't enough. I had to find someone whose child was murdered." Today, while the horror of his son's death at the hands of two house burglars is still fresh, Davis, like dozens of others who gathered in Irvine this weekend for a victims' rights conference, is going beyond sharing his personal tragedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1986 | ROXANE ARNOLD, Times Staff Writer
'People don't identify with this unless it has happened to them. They can't understand why you hold onto it even though you want to let it go. I got to let this go and just take on living . . . But there's something about it. You can't let it go . . .' --Shirley Butler, Co-founder of the group 'Loved Ones of Homicide Victims' who lost two sons to violence. They have a grim, particularly shocking way of introducing themselves, the members of this once-a-month Saturday morning group.
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