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Lee Brown

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NEWS
February 5, 1993 | R. DANIEL FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; R. Daniel Foster writes regularly for The Times.
Collecting Depression glass was never a great idea for Lee Brown, a Sunland resident who lives on an earthquake fault line. And hauling crates of the pastel-colored items around was aggravating her arthritis. A fellow antique dealer offered a solution. Of all the costly items in his shop, postcards, he said, had brought him the greatest enjoyment. On that tip, Brown began collecting postcards two decades ago.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2007
A service celebrating the life of actor Roscoe Lee Browne, who died April 11, will be held at 10 a.m. Sunday at the Music Center's Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. The public is welcome.
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NEWS
March 8, 1987
Bravo to KNBC and Phil Donahue for giving us a week of stimulating and most thought-provoking shows from Russia. I was deeply impressed by the intelligent and thoughtful replies to Donahue's questions, as well as his tactful but truthful responses to those questions asked by the Soviet citizens. Lee Brown, Encino
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2007 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Roscoe Lee Browne, the Emmy-award winning actor with the mellifluous baritone that he used to give voice to roles as varied as Shakespeare's plays and the popular animal film "Babe," died Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 81. The cause of death was cancer, said publicist Alan Nierob. A classically trained actor with a commanding presence, Browne worked for some of the leading directors in film, including Alfred Hitchcock in "Topaz" and Jules Dassin in "Up Tight!"
NEWS
July 6, 1986
Bravo for NBC! The network's "Main Street" edition in prime time on teen-agers and sex was open, frank and literate. And at an hour (8-9 p.m.) which was perfect for both parents and teen-agers to view together. Shows such as this touch many lives in a very personal way. By presenting them, the networks perhaps are taking a giant step forward in making the quality of life for many teen-agers far happier. Lee Brown, Encino
NEWS
August 4, 1992 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police Commissioner Lee P. Brown, who has locked horns with Mayor David N. Dinkins in recent weeks over Dinkins' appointment of an independent panel to investigate alleged corruption in the nation's largest police department, announced his resignation Monday. But the 55-year-old police commissioner, the first black ever to head New York's 29,000-member police force, cited "personal and not professional reasons" for his decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
Growing up in her native Korea, Sarah Hwang learned to hold three figures in high esteem and indisputable trust: God, lawyers and doctors. And so when Lee C. Brown began bringing his clothes to her Laguna Hills dry-cleaning shop a few years ago, the 46-year-old Hwang recalls that she had no reason to doubt his claims of being a successful neurosurgeon.
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor David N. Dinkins and former police commissioner Lee Brown unconstitutionally discriminated against Jewish residents of Brooklyn's Crown Heights neighborhood by failing to protect them from rampaging black gangs during four days of racial rioting in August, 1991, a lawsuit filed Tuesday charges.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the closest mayoral elections in the nation's fourth-largest city, incumbent Lee Brown was struggling Saturday night to win a third term against City Councilman Orlando Sanchez, who was seeking to become the first Latino to lead the city. With 95% of precincts reporting in the runoff election, Brown was ahead with 157,451 votes to Sanchez's 149,585, or 52% to 48%. "It will be a cliffhanger until the last vote is counted," said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1993
In response to your editorial "Inspired Choice for Drug Czar," May 2: The Times loudly proclaims that former New York City Police Chief Lee P. Brown is an inspired choice for drug czar because he knows what cops can and cannot do to reduce drug abuse. I don't think so. It is not a lack of understanding of the law but the law itself that stands in the way of inspired leadership. The drug laws in the U.S. are a joke. They promote corruption here and abroad. They work to encourage drug use. They fuel gangs and violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2004 | Mai Tran and Kevin Pang, Times Staff Writers
Authorities on Monday identified a sniper who wounded three people in a remote Orange County canyon Saturday as a disabled Vietnam veteran and drifter from San Antonio. Henry Lee Brown, 52, was killed by a deputy firing from a helicopter after a four-hour gun battle near a recycling plant at Silverado Canyon and Santiago Canyon roads in the Santa Ana Mountains, officials said. An autopsy was conducted Monday, sheriff's spokesman Jim Amormino said.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the closest mayoral elections in the nation's fourth-largest city, incumbent Lee Brown was struggling Saturday night to win a third term against City Councilman Orlando Sanchez, who was seeking to become the first Latino to lead the city. With 95% of precincts reporting in the runoff election, Brown was ahead with 157,451 votes to Sanchez's 149,585, or 52% to 48%. "It will be a cliffhanger until the last vote is counted," said Dr.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee P. Brown, director of the White House Office of Drug Control Policy, declared Thursday that drug use in the United States would drop 5% a year if Republicans in Congress had not slashed the budget for treating addicts and drug education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1993
In response to your editorial "Inspired Choice for Drug Czar," May 2: The Times loudly proclaims that former New York City Police Chief Lee P. Brown is an inspired choice for drug czar because he knows what cops can and cannot do to reduce drug abuse. I don't think so. It is not a lack of understanding of the law but the law itself that stands in the way of inspired leadership. The drug laws in the U.S. are a joke. They promote corruption here and abroad. They work to encourage drug use. They fuel gangs and violence.
OPINION
May 2, 1993
One hopes that the first cop ever picked to head the nation's anti-drug effort will bring some long overdue common sense to this entirely over-politicized and often misconceived area of federal policy. Wisely, President Clinton has selected former New York City Police Chief Lee P. Brown to direct the Office of National Drug Control Policy. It is an inspired choice. Brown, a former top cop in several cities and the holder of a Ph.D.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton appointed veteran law enforcement official Lee P. Brown as the Administration's top drug official Wednesday in a move intended to shift a measure of federal drug control resources from law enforcement to treatment and prevention. Brown, 55, who formerly headed police forces in Atlanta, Houston and New York, would be the first police official to head the office that coordinates drug-control policy throughout the government, Clinton said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2007 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Roscoe Lee Browne, the Emmy-award winning actor with the mellifluous baritone that he used to give voice to roles as varied as Shakespeare's plays and the popular animal film "Babe," died Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 81. The cause of death was cancer, said publicist Alan Nierob. A classically trained actor with a commanding presence, Browne worked for some of the leading directors in film, including Alfred Hitchcock in "Topaz" and Jules Dassin in "Up Tight!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2007
A service celebrating the life of actor Roscoe Lee Browne, who died April 11, will be held at 10 a.m. Sunday at the Music Center's Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. The public is welcome.
NEWS
February 5, 1993 | R. DANIEL FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; R. Daniel Foster writes regularly for The Times.
Collecting Depression glass was never a great idea for Lee Brown, a Sunland resident who lives on an earthquake fault line. And hauling crates of the pastel-colored items around was aggravating her arthritis. A fellow antique dealer offered a solution. Of all the costly items in his shop, postcards, he said, had brought him the greatest enjoyment. On that tip, Brown began collecting postcards two decades ago.
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor David N. Dinkins and former police commissioner Lee Brown unconstitutionally discriminated against Jewish residents of Brooklyn's Crown Heights neighborhood by failing to protect them from rampaging black gangs during four days of racial rioting in August, 1991, a lawsuit filed Tuesday charges.
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