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Lee Bu Young

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2000 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When South Korean politicians visit Los Angeles--the capital of Koreans in the United States--they routinely meet with first-generation immigrants at fancy restaurants and conduct their business as they would in Korea. "Like frogs in a well, they don't know how the outside world is going," said Howard Y. Ree, a Korean American banker who has lived in Los Angeles since the early 1960s. "Language [inability to speak English] really hampers them."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2000 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When South Korean politicians visit Los Angeles--the capital of Koreans in the United States--they routinely meet with first-generation immigrants at fancy restaurants and conduct their business as they would in Korea. "Like frogs in a well, they don't know how the outside world is going," said Howard Y. Ree, a Korean American banker who has lived in Los Angeles since the early 1960s. "Language [inability to speak English] really hampers them."
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NEWS
June 18, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Look at Lee Bu Young's life and you can see why South Korea has developed a seemingly permanent "dissident class." He started out majoring in political science at the elite Seoul National University and then joining the country's most prestigious newspaper, the Dong-A, after graduation. Had fate not intervened, Lee mused the other day, "I might have been an editorial writer by now."
NEWS
June 18, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Look at Lee Bu Young's life and you can see why South Korea has developed a seemingly permanent "dissident class." He started out majoring in political science at the elite Seoul National University and then joining the country's most prestigious newspaper, the Dong-A, after graduation. Had fate not intervened, Lee mused the other day, "I might have been an editorial writer by now."
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mere idea that South Korean President Kim Young Sam might express condolences to North Korea on the death of leader Kim Il Sung--as President Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama did--sent shock waves through mainstream society here. On Wednesday, the National Assembly members who made the suggestion apologized, one after another, while the opposition Democratic Party disavowed itself from the proposals for the fourth time.
WORLD
January 31, 2003 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
SEOUL -- South Korean government auditors released evidence Thursday supporting allegations that a handsome bribe was paid to secure North Korean leader Kim Jong Il's acquiescence to a landmark summit in Pyongyang with South Korean President Kim Dae Jung.
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Declaring its intent to promote national reconciliation, President Roh Tae Woo's Cabinet approved an amnesty Friday that freed 125 political prisoners today but left 80 others, including the most prominent one, in prison. The amnesty, Roh's first act since assuming office Thursday, freed 2,134 prisoners of all categories, and affected a total of 7,234 people, including criminals and former prisoners whose civil rights will be restored.
NEWS
December 20, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The election of ruling Democratic Liberal Party leader Kim Young Sam as president has reshaped South Korea's political geography, clearing the way for a new generation of leaders to begin positioning themselves for power, analysts said Saturday.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Kim Dae Jung's party placed a distant second in key parliamentary elections as fed-up South Koreans tossed out incumbents and tainted politicians by the score, voted for regional favorites or stayed away from the polls in record numbers, according to unofficial results today.
WORLD
June 15, 2003 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
There were no balloons, no bands and no ribbon-cuttings Saturday as North and South Korea joined their severed railroads across the demilitarized zone in a ceremony marked by its lack of fanfare. The connecting of the tracks came on the eve of the third anniversary of a landmark summit between the leaders of the estranged Koreas.
NEWS
November 20, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chung Hae Son, a 59-year-old manager at a distribution company, sees evidence of South Korea's lost Confucian values every time he walks out his door. Junior associates address him with familiar rather than honorific language. Teenagers laze in the subway without offering their seats to senior citizens. Youngsters approach him for a light while he's smoking with his fiftysomething friends, a breach of hierarchy. "They do things that would be unthinkable in my day," he says.
NEWS
April 10, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The North and South Korean governments each announced today that South Korean President Kim Dae Jung will travel to Pyongyang, the North Korean capital, for a first-ever summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Il from June 12-14. If it comes to pass--and analysts counseled caution in assuming that it will--the summit would be the first meeting between top South and North Korean leaders since the peninsula was divided in 1945.
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