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Lee Dembart

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1988
It's unfortunate and surprising that The Times would publish Lee Dembart's thinly veiled denigration of the humanities in his article extolling scientific progress (Science/Medicine, Oct. 10). His obvious prejudice makes one question his motives. Sadly, I can't argue with Dembart when he says science has made "clear progress." Imagine what the world would be like if science had not made these giant strides: a world without life-threatening pollution; without a hazardously reduced ozone layer; without chemical and germ warfare; without the constant threat of nuclear holocaust.
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BOOKS
May 28, 1989
WE FIND OURSELVES IN MOONTOWN by Jay Gummerman (Alfred A. Knopf: $16.95; 175 pp.) "Anyone who lives in California and yearns to find good new writers will fall upon this book with glad cries . . . because of (Gummerman's) uncanny management of dialogue and the luminous texture of lives that the rest of us barely give a thought to."--Carolyn See AMERICAN GENESIS A Century of Invention and Technological Enthusiasm by Thomas P. Hughes (Viking: $24.95; 349 pp.)
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BOOKS
May 28, 1989
WE FIND OURSELVES IN MOONTOWN by Jay Gummerman (Alfred A. Knopf: $16.95; 175 pp.) "Anyone who lives in California and yearns to find good new writers will fall upon this book with glad cries . . . because of (Gummerman's) uncanny management of dialogue and the luminous texture of lives that the rest of us barely give a thought to."--Carolyn See AMERICAN GENESIS A Century of Invention and Technological Enthusiasm by Thomas P. Hughes (Viking: $24.95; 349 pp.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1988
It's unfortunate and surprising that The Times would publish Lee Dembart's thinly veiled denigration of the humanities in his article extolling scientific progress (Science/Medicine, Oct. 10). His obvious prejudice makes one question his motives. Sadly, I can't argue with Dembart when he says science has made "clear progress." Imagine what the world would be like if science had not made these giant strides: a world without life-threatening pollution; without a hazardously reduced ozone layer; without chemical and germ warfare; without the constant threat of nuclear holocaust.
NEWS
May 11, 1987
In a lifetime of work as a professional librarian and avid bibliophile, I have seldom read a book review as concerned and caring as the one by Lee Dembart of "The Civilized Engineer" by Samuel C. Florman ("An Engineer Extols Virtues of a Humanistic Outlook," April 28). It strikes me as an important book for educators and intellectuals alike to read and ponder over, especially in this age of specialization and computerization. For even if the cultural gap between science and humanism cannot be bridged, as Dembart states, at least with profound pleas such as Florman's, there can be communication.
NEWS
April 22, 1986 | JACK MILES
This month marks the debut of a new Los Angeles Times regular book reviewer: Lee Dembart. To readers of The Times, Dembart's may already be a familiar name. A longtime science writer for the newspaper, author of a near-prophetic series of articles on the Shuttle program, Dembart has most recently been an Editorial Pages writer on science, mathematics, law and other topics.
BOOKS
August 23, 1987
Lee Dembart's flippant review of "Overcoming Depression" (The Book Review, July 28) is disturbing in that it perpetuated some old myths. Dembart's remarks about depression not necessarily being pathological, and about many different antidepressant medications existing "to make sure that the patients keep coming back for yet another try," show surprising ignorance. Feeling down because your dog got run over is indeed normal and appropriate, but that is not what is referred to in the psychiatric definition of "depression."
NEWS
May 11, 1987
I wish to take issue with a recent Times review of a book about the National Geographic Society ("National Geographic Is Put on the Spot," April 7). The reviewer, Lee Dembart, by his own admission acknowledges that he is not only ignorant of the National Geographic, but has an active dislike for it as well. This bias, to my way of thinking, makes him unqualified to review a book that is highly critical of the Society and which is replete with false statements, unsupported conclusions, and a generally careless assessment of the facts.
BOOKS
December 28, 1986 | Lee Dembart
Lee Dembart appears as book reviewer every Tuesday in View, always reviewing nonfiction books, most often reviewing books about science. A few weeks ago, he wrote an enthusiastic review of Richard Dawkins' "The Blind Watchmaker" (Norton) (View, Nov. 25), a book that argues that not only is Darwinian evolution supported by scads of evidence, but it would still be true even if there were no evidence; Darwin offers, says Dawkins (and Dembart agrees), the true explanation and indeed the only possible explanation of the living world.
MAGAZINE
July 3, 1988
Lee Dembart's article, "Kids on the Couch" (May 29), was just the right thing to dispel some of the anxiety parents invariably experience when they need help with their children. Early intervention can prevent much trouble in the future. KATO VAN LEEUWEN CHAIRWOMAN, CHILD AND ADOLESCENT ANALYSIS SECTION OF THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PSYCHOANALYTIC INSTITUTE Los Angeles
BOOKS
August 23, 1987
Lee Dembart's flippant review of "Overcoming Depression" (The Book Review, July 28) is disturbing in that it perpetuated some old myths. Dembart's remarks about depression not necessarily being pathological, and about many different antidepressant medications existing "to make sure that the patients keep coming back for yet another try," show surprising ignorance. Feeling down because your dog got run over is indeed normal and appropriate, but that is not what is referred to in the psychiatric definition of "depression."
NEWS
May 11, 1987
I wish to take issue with a recent Times review of a book about the National Geographic Society ("National Geographic Is Put on the Spot," April 7). The reviewer, Lee Dembart, by his own admission acknowledges that he is not only ignorant of the National Geographic, but has an active dislike for it as well. This bias, to my way of thinking, makes him unqualified to review a book that is highly critical of the Society and which is replete with false statements, unsupported conclusions, and a generally careless assessment of the facts.
NEWS
May 11, 1987
In a lifetime of work as a professional librarian and avid bibliophile, I have seldom read a book review as concerned and caring as the one by Lee Dembart of "The Civilized Engineer" by Samuel C. Florman ("An Engineer Extols Virtues of a Humanistic Outlook," April 28). It strikes me as an important book for educators and intellectuals alike to read and ponder over, especially in this age of specialization and computerization. For even if the cultural gap between science and humanism cannot be bridged, as Dembart states, at least with profound pleas such as Florman's, there can be communication.
BOOKS
December 28, 1986 | Lee Dembart
Lee Dembart appears as book reviewer every Tuesday in View, always reviewing nonfiction books, most often reviewing books about science. A few weeks ago, he wrote an enthusiastic review of Richard Dawkins' "The Blind Watchmaker" (Norton) (View, Nov. 25), a book that argues that not only is Darwinian evolution supported by scads of evidence, but it would still be true even if there were no evidence; Darwin offers, says Dawkins (and Dembart agrees), the true explanation and indeed the only possible explanation of the living world.
NEWS
April 22, 1986 | JACK MILES
This month marks the debut of a new Los Angeles Times regular book reviewer: Lee Dembart. To readers of The Times, Dembart's may already be a familiar name. A longtime science writer for the newspaper, author of a near-prophetic series of articles on the Shuttle program, Dembart has most recently been an Editorial Pages writer on science, mathematics, law and other topics.
BOOKS
January 17, 1988
Lee Dembart's view in his review of "Science, Order and Creativity" (The Book Review, Jan. 3) denotes the very elements that hinder awareness of wisdom versus knowledge. I suggest he read the question/answer volume between Krishnamurti and Bohm. He may be able to follow the path of letting go. ARPINE KONYALIAN GRENIER PASADENA
BOOKS
June 12, 1988
Hicks, yokels, rednecks, with streaks of monstrosity and three-day beards populate the decrepit hamlet of Egypt, Me., in "Letourneau's Used Auto Parts." A wise, moving and often funny book.--Richard Eder THE INVENTION OF MEMORY A New View of the Brain by Israel Rosenfield (Basic Books: $18.95; 224 pp.) In Rosenfield's view, the brain is not a static system, like a computer, but a dynamic one. Individual thoughts, memories and ideas are not stored in specific places but emerge in context.
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