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Lee Elder

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January 2, 1989 | DAN HAFNER, Times Staff Writer
Lee Elder is the surprise entry in the senior division of the Tournament of Champions, which ushers in the professional golf season beginning Thursday at La Costa. Fourteen months ago, Elder had no intention of playing in this tournament. He was in a hospital fighting for his life. Only tournament winners qualify for the opening tournament of the season. Elder climaxed an extraordinary comeback by winning the Gus Machado tournament in late November.
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July 4, 1999 | LEONARD SHAPIRO, WASHINGTON POST
Lee Elder will turn 65 next month, an age when many of his Senior PGA Tour contemporaries essentially have become ceremonial golfers. They are spectator-friendly reminders of golf's past glories and are delighted and rather amazed to be playing for more money than they ever did on the PGA Tour. Elder would like to keep playing senior golf as long as he can. But at times over the past 3 1/2 months, he doubted he would ever play again.
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SPORTS
March 26, 1989 | WILLIAM CLAIBORNE, The Washington Post
The last time Lee Elder was in South Africa he rattled the apartheid cage and the lion of racial bigotry growled, as it was wont to do in those days when the only blacks on the golf courses were usually caddies and when Prime Minister John Vorster was busy making the country the Land of Separate Freedoms. That was 1971, when Elder was here for the South African Open and PGA tours, and he angrily told the local golf writers that he wouldn't come back until apartheid was abolished.
SPORTS
April 14, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Elder was doing 85 mph Sunday morning on the eastbound I-20 when a Georgia cop pulled him over. Rolling down his window, Elder produced his Florida driver's license. The speed limit is 70 here, the cop said. Isn't that high enough? What's your hurry? "I've got to get to the Masters," Elder told him. "I have to see Tiger Woods." The cop said uh-huh, and wrote the speeding ticket.
SPORTS
December 21, 1985 | Associated Press
Lee Elder and partner Pat Bradley recorded four birdies in their first five holes Friday en route to an eight-under-par 63 and the first-round lead in the $730,000 Mazda Champions golf tournament. Two shots off the pace in this 36-hole, Senior PGA Tour-LPGA Tour better-ball tournament were the teams of Gay Brewer-Betsy King, Don January-Alice Miller and Orville Moody-Beth Daniel. First prize is worth $500,000.
SPORTS
November 27, 1988 | WILLIAM GILDEA, The Washington Post
Lee Elder gives thanks. A year ago, the night he finished playing the Gus Machado Classic in Florida on the seniors golfing circuit, Washington's Elder was hit -- and hit hard -- by a heart attack. He had played the tournament with all the warning signs, but failed to recognize them. Packing for a trip home to spend Thanksgiving with his wife Rose, he was literally felled. Remarkably, Elder, 54, came off the final hole of this year's Gus Machado Classic last Sunday feeling great.
SPORTS
April 14, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Elder was doing 85 mph Sunday morning on the eastbound I-20 when a Georgia cop pulled him over. Rolling down his window, Elder produced his Florida driver's license. The speed limit is 70 here, the cop said. Isn't that high enough? What's your hurry? "I've got to get to the Masters," Elder told him. "I have to see Tiger Woods." The cop said uh-huh, and wrote the speeding ticket.
SPORTS
January 9, 1986 | MARC APPLEMAN, Staff Writer
Playing for a winning purse of a mere $30,000 can make the clubs feel lighter, the grass look greener and the air smell sweeter. Just ask Lee Elder, who shot a three-under-par 69 Wednesday to take a one-stroke lead over Miller Barber after the first round of the MONY Tournament of Champions senior division. Elder was discussing the relaxing spas at La Costa when the conversation switched to his latest adventure with high finances. He shook his head.
SPORTS
August 12, 1990 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he was 2, Frederick Chew III was given a set of miniature golf clubs and plastic balls. The back yard became his driving range, the living room rug his putting green. Chew, a small, delicate child, whacked each ball until it was lost. That done, he started hitting marbles. When he was 5, Chew, using a set of mix-and-match clubs bought at the local Goodwill for $3 and cut down at a hardware store, finished last in his first tournament.
SPORTS
March 26, 1989 | WILLIAM CLAIBORNE, The Washington Post
The last time Lee Elder was in South Africa he rattled the apartheid cage and the lion of racial bigotry growled, as it was wont to do in those days when the only blacks on the golf courses were usually caddies and when Prime Minister John Vorster was busy making the country the Land of Separate Freedoms. That was 1971, when Elder was here for the South African Open and PGA tours, and he angrily told the local golf writers that he wouldn't come back until apartheid was abolished.
SPORTS
January 2, 1989 | DAN HAFNER, Times Staff Writer
Lee Elder is the surprise entry in the senior division of the Tournament of Champions, which ushers in the professional golf season beginning Thursday at La Costa. Fourteen months ago, Elder had no intention of playing in this tournament. He was in a hospital fighting for his life. Only tournament winners qualify for the opening tournament of the season. Elder climaxed an extraordinary comeback by winning the Gus Machado tournament in late November.
SPORTS
November 27, 1988 | WILLIAM GILDEA, The Washington Post
Lee Elder gives thanks. A year ago, the night he finished playing the Gus Machado Classic in Florida on the seniors golfing circuit, Washington's Elder was hit -- and hit hard -- by a heart attack. He had played the tournament with all the warning signs, but failed to recognize them. Packing for a trip home to spend Thanksgiving with his wife Rose, he was literally felled. Remarkably, Elder, 54, came off the final hole of this year's Gus Machado Classic last Sunday feeling great.
SPORTS
September 23, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Hal Sutton sank a 15-foot birdie put on the first extra hole Sunday to beat Mike Reid in a playoff and win the $400,000 Southwest tournament at Abilene, Tex. It was Sutton's second sudden-death win this year. He defeated David Ogrin in a playoff to win the Memphis Open. Reid and Sutton finished 72 holes at 273, 15-under par, after fighting 30 m.p.h. winds that sent scores soaring at the Fairway Oaks Golf Club. Sutton shot a 71 and Reid had an even-par 72.
SPORTS
July 4, 1999 | LEONARD SHAPIRO, WASHINGTON POST
Lee Elder will turn 65 next month, an age when many of his Senior PGA Tour contemporaries essentially have become ceremonial golfers. They are spectator-friendly reminders of golf's past glories and are delighted and rather amazed to be playing for more money than they ever did on the PGA Tour. Elder would like to keep playing senior golf as long as he can. But at times over the past 3 1/2 months, he doubted he would ever play again.
SPORTS
January 9, 1986 | MARC APPLEMAN, Staff Writer
Playing for a winning purse of a mere $30,000 can make the clubs feel lighter, the grass look greener and the air smell sweeter. Just ask Lee Elder, who shot a three-under-par 69 Wednesday to take a one-stroke lead over Miller Barber after the first round of the MONY Tournament of Champions senior division. Elder was discussing the relaxing spas at La Costa when the conversation switched to his latest adventure with high finances. He shook his head.
SPORTS
December 21, 1985 | Associated Press
Lee Elder and partner Pat Bradley recorded four birdies in their first five holes Friday en route to an eight-under-par 63 and the first-round lead in the $730,000 Mazda Champions golf tournament. Two shots off the pace in this 36-hole, Senior PGA Tour-LPGA Tour better-ball tournament were the teams of Gay Brewer-Betsy King, Don January-Alice Miller and Orville Moody-Beth Daniel. First prize is worth $500,000.
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