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Lee Friedlander

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The view from a moving car framed by a window is a snapshot many travelers have locked in their memories. Lee Friedlander, well known for his idiosyncratic style of photography, has applied his old tricks to incorporate alternative visuals of those hours-long adventures traversing back roads and highways. Friedlander hit the road on a years-long trek across 50 states capturing snippets of Americana as seen through a thin layer of tinted cover glass. The resulting multidimensional photographs are the subject of his recently released book "America by Car. " In it is a revealing portrait of America as a beautiful, kitschy, gritty and diverse landscape.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2011 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
You don't hear much about street photography anymore. There are lots of reasons why. One, hitherto unacknowledged, is that artist Ed Ruscha's extraordinary photo books turned the genre upside down in the 1960s. It hasn't been the same since. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article included a caption that identified the photograph as "untitled. " The photograph is titled "Los Angeles, California. " In the '60s, street photography's art world stature was peaking.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1993 | STEVE APPLEFORD, Steve Appleford is a regular contributor to The Times.
He just seemed to be doing something wrong here in these pictures. Too many awkward light poles and fences and fenders and stray dogs and signposts and side mirrors and his own shadow interfering with the main subject, whatever that might be. Back in the 1960s this was just weird, and not exactly welcome in every corner of the art world. If Lee Friedlander noticed this rejection in conservative photography circles then, he says he hardly remembers anything about it now.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The view from a moving car framed by a window is a snapshot many travelers have locked in their memories. Lee Friedlander, well known for his idiosyncratic style of photography, has applied his old tricks to incorporate alternative visuals of those hours-long adventures traversing back roads and highways. Friedlander hit the road on a years-long trek across 50 states capturing snippets of Americana as seen through a thin layer of tinted cover glass. The resulting multidimensional photographs are the subject of his recently released book "America by Car. " In it is a revealing portrait of America as a beautiful, kitschy, gritty and diverse landscape.
BOOKS
December 6, 1992 | Fred Schruers, Schruers is completing a nonfiction book in New Orleans.
Lee Friedlander has traced his inspiration for taking up photography at age 16 to hearing a Charlie Parker record: "He made me understand that anything is possible." Friedlander shot "The Jazz People of New Orleans" with the spirit of a documentarian, and the striking thing about his approach here is his humility before his subjects. The pictures were made between 1957, when Friedlander first visited New Orleans, and 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | Jason Gelt
Best known as the guitarist for seminal superband the Police, Andy Summers' list of artistic achievements include the Guitar Player Hall of Fame, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, more than two dozen solo albums and photography, as seen in "I'll Be Watching You: Inside the Police, 1980-1983," a striking visual record of that time. He'll sign copies at Amoeba Music on Tuesday at 6 p.m. WHO ARE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHIC INFLUENCES? Ralph Gibson, Lee Friedlander, Diane Arbus, Cartier-Bresson, Robert Frank -- that was the school I was turned on by. I was really influenced by black-and-white imagery and living the life I was -- on the road -- that approach felt suited to me. It's sort of like playing guitar -- you hear something or look at something or feel something and you want to emulate it. WHAT'S THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PHOTOGRAPHY AND MUSIC?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2011 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
You don't hear much about street photography anymore. There are lots of reasons why. One, hitherto unacknowledged, is that artist Ed Ruscha's extraordinary photo books turned the genre upside down in the 1960s. It hasn't been the same since. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article included a caption that identified the photograph as "untitled. " The photograph is titled "Los Angeles, California. " In the '60s, street photography's art world stature was peaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Truth or Dare? Still haven't had enough of Madonna? The Museum of Modern Art in New York may offer more of the pop icon this summer. A collection of nudes by photographer Lee Friedlander on exhibit from July 25 through Oct. 8 may include nude photos of Madonna, taken about 12 years ago when she was an artist's model. According to New York magazine, four photographs of the singer-actress were published in a companion book to the exhibit, which will use 50 of the 84 photos in the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2009 | Associated Press
The Material Girl has lost some of her glitter -- at auction, anyway. A full-frontal nude photo of a 20-year-old Madonna sold for just $37,500 on Thursday, a sharp drop from the $96,000 auction record set in 2005 during flusher times. The Lee Friedlander photograph was purchased by Italian businessman Fabrizio Masoni. He is the owner of a leather products company in Tuscany. The photo will be added to the company's art collection and be exhibited in its showroom. On Thursday, Christie's had said that Friedlander's explicit black-and-white image of Madonna may have been the highest price paid at auction for a photograph of the singer.
BOOKS
November 3, 1996 | Jenny Cornuelle
BELLOCQ: Photographs From Storyville, the Red-Light District of New Orleans, with text by John Szarkowski, introduction by Susan Sontag. (Random House: $29.95, 83 pp.) E.J. Bellocq made his remarkable photographs of the Storyville prostitutes in 1912, but they weren't discovered till years after his death. In 1966, photographer Lee Friedlander bought all 89 prints and showed 34 of them at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | Jason Gelt
Best known as the guitarist for seminal superband the Police, Andy Summers' list of artistic achievements include the Guitar Player Hall of Fame, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, more than two dozen solo albums and photography, as seen in "I'll Be Watching You: Inside the Police, 1980-1983," a striking visual record of that time. He'll sign copies at Amoeba Music on Tuesday at 6 p.m. WHO ARE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHIC INFLUENCES? Ralph Gibson, Lee Friedlander, Diane Arbus, Cartier-Bresson, Robert Frank -- that was the school I was turned on by. I was really influenced by black-and-white imagery and living the life I was -- on the road -- that approach felt suited to me. It's sort of like playing guitar -- you hear something or look at something or feel something and you want to emulate it. WHAT'S THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PHOTOGRAPHY AND MUSIC?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1993 | STEVE APPLEFORD, Steve Appleford is a regular contributor to The Times.
He just seemed to be doing something wrong here in these pictures. Too many awkward light poles and fences and fenders and stray dogs and signposts and side mirrors and his own shadow interfering with the main subject, whatever that might be. Back in the 1960s this was just weird, and not exactly welcome in every corner of the art world. If Lee Friedlander noticed this rejection in conservative photography circles then, he says he hardly remembers anything about it now.
BOOKS
December 6, 1992 | Fred Schruers, Schruers is completing a nonfiction book in New Orleans.
Lee Friedlander has traced his inspiration for taking up photography at age 16 to hearing a Charlie Parker record: "He made me understand that anything is possible." Friedlander shot "The Jazz People of New Orleans" with the spirit of a documentarian, and the striking thing about his approach here is his humility before his subjects. The pictures were made between 1957, when Friedlander first visited New Orleans, and 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1995 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In a move that establishes the Museum of Contemporary Art as a major collector of photography, increases its photographic holdings five-fold and charts a course for future acquisitions, the museum has purchased a collection of 2,100 prints for $1.15 million. The collection, built by former New York photography dealer Robert Freidus, traces the development of American documentary photography from the 1940s through the 1980s in the work of 11 artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2000 | WILLIAM WILSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
MOCA's traveling photography show "The Social Scene" is a compelling experience despite somewhat convoluted organization. Put together from the permanent collection by curator Connie Butler, it presents some 300 works by nine artists. As famous as Brassai, Diane Arbus, Robert Frank, Garry Winogrand and Lee Friedlander, they're also as unfamiliar as Helen Levitt, John Pfahl, Danny Lyon and Roger Mertin. The idea seems to be that these artists represented a sea change in documentary photography.
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