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Lee Garrett

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1990
A songwriter who once sued pop icon Stevie Wonder over the song "I Just Called to Say I Love You" testified Thursday in Los Angeles that any similarities between that tune and a song he wrote are coincidental. Lee Garrett said he withdrew from the copyright infringement suit against Wonder, a longtime friend who had prevented Garrett from committing suicide in 1977, "because it (the suit) was based on a lie."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1990
A songwriter who once sued pop icon Stevie Wonder over the song "I Just Called to Say I Love You" testified Thursday in Los Angeles that any similarities between that tune and a song he wrote are coincidental. Lee Garrett said he withdrew from the copyright infringement suit against Wonder, a longtime friend who had prevented Garrett from committing suicide in 1977, "because it (the suit) was based on a lie."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND and VICTOR VALLE, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The 9th U.S. Court of Appeals has ruled that songwriter Lloyd Chiate has sufficient grounds to pursue a copyright infringement case against Stevie Wonder over the hit song "I Just Called to Say I Love You." The appeals court on Monday ordered a full hearing to examine Chiate's claim that Wonder's hit single duplicates Chiate's own copyrighted composition. A U.S.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1988 | LESLIE BERKMAN
A patent infringement lawsuit against Trimedyne, a Santa Ana maker of laser catheters to treat arteriosclerosis, has been dismissed by a federal court in San Francisco. Dr. Lee Garrett and his Oakland firm, Xintec Inc., claimed ownership of two Trimedyne patents for technology that Garrett says he helped to develop while working as a consultant to Trimedyne. Trimedyne, however, contends that under the terms of Garrett's consultant contract the technology belongs to Trimedyne.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The opening image of four white men in suits surrounding a young Asian man in T-shirt and pants is perhaps unavoidably loaded, but then Chay Yew's ensemble play at the Burbage Theatre, "Porcelain," is about fundamental conflicts--between races, between heterosexual and homosexual men, between differing emotional needs. Yew has said that his play isn't really about any of these subjects, but about "loving and relationships."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pop singer-composer Stevie Wonder, accused in a lawsuit of stealing the song "I Just Called to Say I Love You," testified Thursday in federal court that he got the idea for the hit tune in 1976 while being driven to a hotel in Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A songwriter who has accused pop icon Stevie Wonder of stealing the song "I Just Called to Say I Love You" from him testified Monday that no one in the record industry would "touch me with a 10-foot pole" since he sued Wonder in 1985. On the third day of his $25-million copyright infringement suit against Wonder, songwriter Lloyd Chiate, 40, said in response to a question from his lawyer, Herbert Dodell, he has had trouble selling songs in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pop star Stevie Wonder won a major copyright infringement lawsuit Thursday when a Los Angeles federal court jury found that the blind singer-composer did not plagiarize the award-winning song "I Just Called to Say I Love You" from another songwriter. "God is good. I knew the truth all along," Wonder told a crush of reporters outside the U.S. District Courthouse after the verdict was announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1998 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The plot, such as it is, of "Daddy's Dyin' (Who's Got the Will?)" is summed up by the title. But the comedy, now playing at the Conejo Players Theater, transcends its thin story line, richly portraying a colorful Texas family. When Daddy Buford (John Sisk) has suffered a debilitating stroke, the members of his family, who seldom speak to one another, are forced to confront the situation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
From the moment Bella Swan blinks those blood-red eyes of a newborn vampire, you just know that "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2" is going to be vampirrific. Which is not quite the same as terrific, but for the swooning series that made heartthrobs of Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson and Taylor Lautner, it just feels right. In its fifth and theoretically final film, the mega movie monster spawned by novelist Stephenie Meyer's phenomenon spends virtually all of its 115 minutes feeding the unquenchable thirst its fans have for all things "Twilight.
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