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Lee Lake Water District

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November 5, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For almost 25 years, a little-known water district that covers much of the Temescal Valley in Riverside County sat idle with few assets, little overhead and no customers. The Lee Lake Water District, which spans 8,400 acres of rural land along Interstate 15 between Corona and Lake Elsinore, didn't even have rights to its namesake body of water. Now, with unprecedented residential growth projected for the next two decades in the valley, the water district has come to life.
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NEWS
November 5, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For almost 25 years, a little-known water district that covers much of the Temescal Valley in Riverside County sat idle with few assets, little overhead and no customers. The Lee Lake Water District, which spans 8,400 acres of rural land along Interstate 15 between Corona and Lake Elsinore, didn't even have rights to its namesake body of water. Now, with unprecedented residential growth projected for the next two decades in the valley, the water district has come to life.
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NEWS
June 9, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To Corona, Lake Elsinore's municipal water district is an "empire builder." In turn, Elsinore Valley Municipal Water District officials call Corona "a rattlesnake." Both agencies are fighting over the rights to the Temescal Valley Water Co., which primarily serves 6,500 acres of agricultural land in a region targeted for substantial residential, industrial and commercial growth in the next two decades. Each side claims it needs the Temescal Valley Water Co.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To Corona, Lake Elsinore's municipal water district is an "empire builder." In turn, Elsinore Valley Municipal Water District officials call Corona "a rattlesnake." Both agencies are fighting over the rights to the Temescal Valley Water Co., which primarily serves 6,500 acres of agricultural land in a region targeted for substantial residential, industrial and commercial growth in the next two decades. Each side claims it needs the Temescal Valley Water Co.
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