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Lee Macphail

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Lee MacPhail, a former American League president who was the oldest member of baseball's Hall of Fame and part of one of the sport's foremost families, has died. He was 95. MacPhail, who with his father forms the only father-son duo in the baseball shrine, died of natural causes Thursday at his home in Delray Beach, Fla., the Hall of Fame announced. During a baseball career that spanned five decades, the younger MacPhail was president and general manager of the New York Yankees and general manager of the Baltimore Orioles before serving as president of the American League from 1974 to 1983.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Lee MacPhail, a former American League president who was the oldest member of baseball's Hall of Fame and part of one of the sport's foremost families, has died. He was 95. MacPhail, who with his father forms the only father-son duo in the baseball shrine, died of natural causes Thursday at his home in Delray Beach, Fla., the Hall of Fame announced. During a baseball career that spanned five decades, the younger MacPhail was president and general manager of the New York Yankees and general manager of the Baltimore Orioles before serving as president of the American League from 1974 to 1983.
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SPORTS
September 4, 1990
Lee MacPhail, former American League president, said Commissioner Fay Vincent should have stayed out of the dispute between National League President Bill White and the league's umpires. "In on-field matters of this nature, the league president has full and complete authority," MacPhail was quoted as saying in Monday's Philadelphia Inquirer. "The commissioner should have said, 'I support Bill White 1,000% in this case,' and left it at that."
SPORTS
July 27, 1998 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Larry Doby, who integrated the American League only 11 weeks after Jackie Robinson broke major league baseball's color barrier, was inducted into the Hall of Fame on Sunday--36 years after his fellow pioneer. It was long overdue, but Doby talked only about the honor of his selection, the pride of his accomplishments and the unlimited possibilities when people work together.
SPORTS
December 22, 1985 | Associated Press
Lee MacPhail looked content. Next door to his office, members of baseball's Player Relations Committee were working on position papers for a labor hearing. He would help them, of course. He has always helped. For two more weeks, PRC staffers will have the benefit of his experience. After that, they're on their own. On Dec. 31, after 42 years in baseball, MacPhail is retiring. "They'll let me go this time," he said. "If there's ever any real need, they know where to find me."
SPORTS
March 7, 1986
Thomas Boswell of the Washington Post says that Lee MacPhail, former American League president, holds three league records that may never be broken. "He has visited at least two art museums in every major league city," Boswell writes. "He has been to the symphony in all of them, too. And while on airplanes between those towns, he has read at least one biography of every American president, two on most." These would figure to be lonely pursuits, but you never know.
SPORTS
July 27, 1998 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Larry Doby, who integrated the American League only 11 weeks after Jackie Robinson broke major league baseball's color barrier, was inducted into the Hall of Fame on Sunday--36 years after his fellow pioneer. It was long overdue, but Doby talked only about the honor of his selection, the pride of his accomplishments and the unlimited possibilities when people work together.
SPORTS
March 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
More than a half-century ago, Larry Doby walked into a Cleveland clubhouse where some teammates would not even shake his hand. On Tuesday, he got a much warmer welcome from the Hall of Fame. Doby, 73, the first black player in the American League, was an easy choice as the Veterans Committee voted in its full limit of four new members. Former American League president Lee MacPhail, Negro Leagues star "Bullet" Joe Rogan and turn-of-the-century shortstop "Gorgeous" George Davis also were elected.
SPORTS
June 12, 1986
The Sporting News will present its annual pioneer award to Lee MacPhail, former American League president and retired head of the owners' Player Relations Committee, June 23 at the National Old Timers game in Washington.
SPORTS
May 23, 1985 | Associated Press
Both sides in the baseball contract talks say they expect strike authorization to be given to union negotiators when the executive board of the Major League Players Assn. meets here today. Lee MacPhail, the owners' chief negotiator, has said he expects an affirmative vote for strike authorization, which would give union officials the right to call a walkout when and if they believe it is necessary.
SPORTS
March 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
More than a half-century ago, Larry Doby walked into a Cleveland clubhouse where some teammates would not even shake his hand. On Tuesday, he got a much warmer welcome from the Hall of Fame. Doby, 73, the first black player in the American League, was an easy choice as the Veterans Committee voted in its full limit of four new members. Former American League president Lee MacPhail, Negro Leagues star "Bullet" Joe Rogan and turn-of-the-century shortstop "Gorgeous" George Davis also were elected.
SPORTS
September 4, 1990
Lee MacPhail, former American League president, said Commissioner Fay Vincent should have stayed out of the dispute between National League President Bill White and the league's umpires. "In on-field matters of this nature, the league president has full and complete authority," MacPhail was quoted as saying in Monday's Philadelphia Inquirer. "The commissioner should have said, 'I support Bill White 1,000% in this case,' and left it at that."
SPORTS
March 7, 1986
Thomas Boswell of the Washington Post says that Lee MacPhail, former American League president, holds three league records that may never be broken. "He has visited at least two art museums in every major league city," Boswell writes. "He has been to the symphony in all of them, too. And while on airplanes between those towns, he has read at least one biography of every American president, two on most." These would figure to be lonely pursuits, but you never know.
SPORTS
December 22, 1985 | Associated Press
Lee MacPhail looked content. Next door to his office, members of baseball's Player Relations Committee were working on position papers for a labor hearing. He would help them, of course. He has always helped. For two more weeks, PRC staffers will have the benefit of his experience. After that, they're on their own. On Dec. 31, after 42 years in baseball, MacPhail is retiring. "They'll let me go this time," he said. "If there's ever any real need, they know where to find me."
NEWS
August 2, 1985 | Associated Press
The chief negotiator for baseball club owners today sharply rejected two points of Commissioner Peter Ueberroth's "potential solutions," saying he will continue to "negotiate financial matters . . . in the same manner as any American business or industry." Lee MacPhail said he would continue to review five proposals, including dropping a proposed salary cap, made by Ueberroth in an attempt to avert a strike called for Tuesday.
SPORTS
March 30, 1985 | Associated Press
Major league baseball moved closer Friday to expanding its playoffs from a best-of-five to a best-of-seven series, the chief negotiator for the owners said. "We think that we made a little progress on it," said Lee MacPhail, president of the owners' Player Relations Committee, following 3 1/2 hours of meetings with the players' union. "We'll go into our meeting on Tuesday in Palm Springs with the idea of coming out with a yes or a no."
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