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Lee Mathis

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NEWS
May 4, 1996
Lee Mathis, 44, actor best known for his recurring role as Jon Hanley on "General Hospital." Mathis grew up in Pittsburgh and attended West Virginia University before moving to New York City to study dance. He later appeared in Broadway and touring productions of "Pippin," "Dancin'," and "Zorba the Greek." His Hollywood motion picture credits include "All That Jazz," "Bugsy," "Barton Fink," "Murder in the First" and "Red Ribbon Bandits."
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NEWS
May 4, 1996
Lee Mathis, 44, actor best known for his recurring role as Jon Hanley on "General Hospital." Mathis grew up in Pittsburgh and attended West Virginia University before moving to New York City to study dance. He later appeared in Broadway and touring productions of "Pippin," "Dancin'," and "Zorba the Greek." His Hollywood motion picture credits include "All That Jazz," "Bugsy," "Barton Fink," "Murder in the First" and "Red Ribbon Bandits."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1993 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing the loss of his Screen Actors Guild health insurance, Lee Mathis was on edge. Eight years ago, he tested positive for HIV and, despite the fact he's asymptomatic, the prospect of developing AIDS looms large. "Anyone could be hit by a truck," Mathis says. "But with HIV, the wolf is at the door." Against the advice of friends who feared a homophobic backlash, Mathis placed a $99 ad in Variety a few weeks ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1994 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Mathis has just shaved his head, a step he had been contemplating for a long time but lacked the courage to take. Advertising himself as an HIV-positive actor who needed work to qualify for union health coverage bolstered his resolve not to pull punches--as did the outpouring of concern in its wake.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1994 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Mathis has just shaved his head, a step he had been contemplating for a long time but lacked the courage to take. Advertising himself as an HIV-positive actor who needed work to qualify for union health coverage bolstered his resolve not to pull punches--as did the outpouring of concern in its wake.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1993 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Big Tush, Little Tush," an Immediate Theatre presentation at the Groundling Theatre in West Hollywood, plays like a show that started with a "cute" family anecdote, has outgrown it but doesn't know it yet. Written by elementary school teacher Jeff Lantos--based on a story he wrote with his wife, LeeAn--the action begins when a little girl named Molly (Elisabeth Moss) wishes that her "tushie" wasn't "so small."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1994
I have just seen what I consider to be one of the most startling and brutally effective films of my recent memory, a film that is unrelenting in its realistic details, yet touching and life affirming and, yes, even entertaining. It is an extremely violent film, yet a film that neither glamorizes nor romanticizes violence. This is a cry of awakening, of reaffirmation, for here is a film that can take one of the ugliest events on the human soul and still find a joy of being. This film achieves verisimilitude.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1999 | RENEE MOILANEN and SCOTT MARTELLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Administrators for at least six Orange County high schools have routinely given confidential lists of students' home addresses to commercial vendors in apparent violation of state education codes and, in some cases, the districts' policies. The practice involves companies that sell class rings and other school memorabilia; the firms then use the mailing lists to send marketing and promotional material to students' homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Maleness is much richer than the culture usually allows for, and Theatre of N.O.T.E.'s one-act threesome, "Clothes Horses," suggests that no two men are alike. None of these one-acts--written, directed and acted by men--is alike either. Jon Tolins, a writer with a refreshing knack for comically revelatory situations (as in his still-running "The Climate"), starts things off with "The Man Who Got Away."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Narcissistic plays about modern single life and the struggle for love are often cheap to produce and serve as a pilot program for writing and stand-up skills. But the genre has worn thin. That said, there's always the chance a minimalist love story will be so artfully staged, the material looks fresh. Two bountiful examples, both three-character plays, are "Nothing So Simple as Love" at Theatre/Theater in Hollywood and a "Key Exchange" revival at the Whitefire Theater in Sherman Oaks.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1993 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing the loss of his Screen Actors Guild health insurance, Lee Mathis was on edge. Eight years ago, he tested positive for HIV and, despite the fact he's asymptomatic, the prospect of developing AIDS looms large. "Anyone could be hit by a truck," Mathis says. "But with HIV, the wolf is at the door." Against the advice of friends who feared a homophobic backlash, Mathis placed a $99 ad in Variety a few weeks ago.
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