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Lee Pharmaceuticals

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BUSINESS
April 10, 1998 | (Bloomberg News)
Lee Pharmaceuticals, two of its executives and a director settled a Securities and Exchange Commission complaint alleging the company concealed an estimated $700,000 in environmental cleanup liabilities from shareholders from 1991 to 1996. It's the first case alleging failure to reveal such liabilities filed by the SEC since 1980, a spokeswoman said. The El Monte company makes nail and skin care products. "It's the most ridiculous bureaucratic thing I've ever run across," said Henry L.
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BUSINESS
April 10, 1998 | (Bloomberg News)
Lee Pharmaceuticals, two of its executives and a director settled a Securities and Exchange Commission complaint alleging the company concealed an estimated $700,000 in environmental cleanup liabilities from shareholders from 1991 to 1996. It's the first case alleging failure to reveal such liabilities filed by the SEC since 1980, a spokeswoman said. The El Monte company makes nail and skin care products. "It's the most ridiculous bureaucratic thing I've ever run across," said Henry L.
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NEWS
June 11, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Albert G. Perez sat on the edge of his seat in the back of an air-conditioned sedan, pointing through the tinted windows at the good, the bad and the ugly of his small, industrial flavored town. Sure, the mayor was saying, this is not San Juan Capistrano--not with the hodgepodge of smudge-encrusted Quonset huts, lots with graffiti-sprayed walls and row after row of windowless machine shops. But there are pleasant areas, too, he said, ordering the city manager to steer down tidy streets of single-family stucco homes, many with neat lawns, fresh coats of paint and white wrought-iron fences.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
South El Monte Mayor Albert G. Perez sat on the edge of his seat in the back of an air-conditioned sedan, pointing through the tinted windows at the good, the bad and the ugly of his small, industrial flavored town. Sure, the mayor was saying, this is not San Juan Capistrano--not with the hodgepodge of smudge-encrusted Quonset huts, lots with graffiti-sprayed walls and row after row of windowless machine shops. But there are pleasant areas, too, he said, ordering the city manager to steer down tidy streets of single-family stucco homes, many with neat lawns, fresh coats of paint and white wrought-iron fences.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
South El Monte Mayor Albert G. Perez sat on the edge of his seat in the back of an air-conditioned sedan, pointing through the tinted windows at the good, the bad and the ugly of his small, industrial flavored town. Sure, the mayor was saying, this is not San Juan Capistrano--not with the hodgepodge of smudge-encrusted Quonset huts, lots with graffiti-sprayed walls and row after row of windowless machine shops. But there are pleasant areas, too, he said, ordering the city manager to steer down tidy streets of single-family stucco homes, many with neat lawns, fresh coats of paint and white wrought-iron fences.
NEWS
January 14, 1988
Tests have uncovered ground water contamination under Lee Pharmaceuticals on Santa Anita Avenue. Soil and water studies were begun after the company applied for a county permit to stop using an underground chemical storage tank. The Regional Water Quality Control Board is studying ways to clean up the acetone and methylene chloride contamination before it reaches drinking water stored in wells.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1987
Ronald G. Lee has been named president of Lee Pharmaceuticals, South El Monte. The firm develops, manufactures and markets artificial fingernails, health and beauty aids and professional dental and orthodontic supplies. Theodore H. Dettlaff was named president of the consumer products division; Rolf D. Mast, vice president of research and development, and Michael L. Agresti, vice president of finance.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1986
The Securities and Exchange Commission announced that it had settled charges against Henry L. Lee Jr., chairman of Lee Pharmaceuticals of South El Monte, and William Ziegler, chairman of American-Maize Products of Stamford, Conn., that they repeatedly filed late reports of their transactions in their companies' stock in 1984 and 1985. The charges were settled without the executives admitting or denying any wrongdoing.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It clearly pays to be a top officer of one of California's top corporations, but company insiders often get far more than just a salary, perks and lucrative severance arrangements. In many cases, they are involved in other business arrangements with their firms that can pay off in a big way. Hamburger mogul Carl Karcher, for example, drew a relatively modest $389,169 in cash compensation from Carl Karcher Enterprises last year.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Albert G. Perez sat on the edge of his seat in the back of an air-conditioned sedan, pointing through the tinted windows at the good, the bad and the ugly of his small, industrial flavored town. Sure, the mayor was saying, this is not San Juan Capistrano--not with the hodgepodge of smudge-encrusted Quonset huts, lots with graffiti-sprayed walls and row after row of windowless machine shops. But there are pleasant areas, too, he said, ordering the city manager to steer down tidy streets of single-family stucco homes, many with neat lawns, fresh coats of paint and white wrought-iron fences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1999 | PAMELA J. JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ernest Carlson was a young doctor when he purchased an auto parts store on Ventura Avenue to bring in extra cash for his growing family. Two decades later federal officials ordered him to remove underground gas tanks on his property, where a service station once stood. He paid $116,000 to have 15 truckloads of dirt hauled to a toxic-waste dump in northern Santa Barbara County. "Then I put it all behind me," said Carlson, now 77 and retired in Santa Paula.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1987 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Like an aging rock superstar returning again for an encore concert, Wall Street turned in another stellar performance in 1986, prolonging the bull market's life for a fourth straight year. But experts say it may be harder for stocks to retain their thunder this year. Spurred by lower interest rates and low inflation, Wall Street rose far higher than most analysts had expected as stocks generally outshone bonds, precious metals, housing and many other investments.
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