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Lee Podolak

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996
Re "Assembly OKs Concealed Gun Permits Bill," Feb. 1: National Rifle Assn. contributions to our Assembly members have now succeeded in assuring that all Californians will be armed and dangerous. LEE PODOLAK Orange Well, at last the Republicans gain control of the Assembly and begin to address the real problems facing our state. Apparently we need to put more guns on the street, protect ourselves against the terrible dangers of same-sex marriages and adopt the necessary rules to keep insurance companies from having to pay people injured in car accidents (Feb.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Podolak, a forceful community advocate who put homeless people on Orange County's agenda, will be remembered at a memorial service today by colleagues and peers who called her "irreplaceable." Podolak, 67, died Friday after a battle with cancer. The longtime resident of Orange spent nearly half her life working as a volunteer in various community organizations where she did everything from licking envelopes to pestering legislators.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1993
I cannot understand where Janie Cowlin (Letters, Oct. 20) got her information. She claims that Proposition 168 is "a guise by the state government to gain more control over local government." Proposition 168 has absolutely nothing to do with state control--rather it is an amendment to the Constitution dealing strictly with local development. Proposition 168 simply removes one barrier to the construction of affordable housing--that of forcing a vote every time a project is proposed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2000
Reading both your editorial ("Less Time on the Road, Sept. 10) and an article the next day ("Disney Is Casting About for Workers," Sept. 11) shows that the prospects for traffic become even more challenging as Disney looks for 8,500 new employees for California Adventure. It is especially difficult since wages for these employees will range from $6 to $7.50 per hour (and up to $8.50 an hour at the California Grand Hotel). Part-timers, young adults living with parents, or those supplementing another income may be able to be housed under these circumstances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1992
"TRW Deal Seen as Job-Saving Model for State" (May 14): Your article outlines rent subsidies given to a large corporation to entice it to keep some 1,200 jobs in Orange, yet very little mention is made of one of the biggest reasons businesses large and small give for leaving Orange County, and indeed, for leaving California--the lack of housing their employees can afford. Aside from the city's program of low-interest loans to first-time home buyers, there is very little chance for housing affordable to our job force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1998
James L. Doti and Robert A. Elliott tell an inspiring story of Orange County's growth as a center for medical instrument and supply manufacture ("Cultivating a Breeding Ground for Entrepreneurs in Orange County," Oct. 4). They further provide a "comprehensive" laundry list of all they consider essential for continuing to foster the entrepreneurial spirit of Orange County: proper zoning, low taxes, communication, transportation, education and even the arts. So what's missing? Nowhere do our "best and brightest" acknowledge that to continue to thrive, our economy needs to provide housing for all these entrepreneurs--and their employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1997
Gov. Pete Wilson is vetoing a logical welfare-to-work plan, one that would get more people to work while protecting children, claiming it is too expensive. Meanwhile, he is proposing a $1-billion cut in income tax for people earning less than $100,000 (July 17). Is this his way of running for president in 2000? Cut taxes and starve children? And what about his timing? Here we are with the Legislature waiting to start summer vacations, with the state budget nowhere near settled, and he throws in a middle-class tax cut. How cynical can he get?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2000
Reading both your editorial ("Less Time on the Road, Sept. 10) and an article the next day ("Disney Is Casting About for Workers," Sept. 11) shows that the prospects for traffic become even more challenging as Disney looks for 8,500 new employees for California Adventure. It is especially difficult since wages for these employees will range from $6 to $7.50 per hour (and up to $8.50 an hour at the California Grand Hotel). Part-timers, young adults living with parents, or those supplementing another income may be able to be housed under these circumstances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2000
Your Aug. 26 editorial, "A Job but No Place to Live," very clearly points out the climate in Sacramento, that of encouragement and funding for the construction of housing for working people. Unfortunately, although Sacramento "gets it," it is in the cities of our state that housing will be built, and until our city councils "get it" (i.e., the political will), we will never see the jobs/housing balance that is necessary to sustain our economic growth. This is especially true in Orange County, where cities such as Anaheim still deny permits for multifamily housing in older areas and Orange reduces densities in newly developing areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1999
Re "More Help for the Homeless," Jan. 10 editorial: The Orange County Homeless Issues Task Force and all of our member shelter and service providers are proud and appreciative of the grant of $6.48 million from the federal Housing and Urban Development Department. We are thankful for the assistance of county housing and community development staff for the efforts they put into the application and the endless hours of community participation by our members and their staff. However, although the grant will serve approximately one-eighth of the homeless in Orange County, it is restricted in that it only funds transitional housing programs and permanent affordable housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2000
Your Aug. 26 editorial, "A Job but No Place to Live," very clearly points out the climate in Sacramento, that of encouragement and funding for the construction of housing for working people. Unfortunately, although Sacramento "gets it," it is in the cities of our state that housing will be built, and until our city councils "get it" (i.e., the political will), we will never see the jobs/housing balance that is necessary to sustain our economic growth. This is especially true in Orange County, where cities such as Anaheim still deny permits for multifamily housing in older areas and Orange reduces densities in newly developing areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1999
Re "More Help for the Homeless," Jan. 10 editorial: The Orange County Homeless Issues Task Force and all of our member shelter and service providers are proud and appreciative of the grant of $6.48 million from the federal Housing and Urban Development Department. We are thankful for the assistance of county housing and community development staff for the efforts they put into the application and the endless hours of community participation by our members and their staff. However, although the grant will serve approximately one-eighth of the homeless in Orange County, it is restricted in that it only funds transitional housing programs and permanent affordable housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1998
James L. Doti and Robert A. Elliott tell an inspiring story of Orange County's growth as a center for medical instrument and supply manufacture ("Cultivating a Breeding Ground for Entrepreneurs in Orange County," Oct. 4). They further provide a "comprehensive" laundry list of all they consider essential for continuing to foster the entrepreneurial spirit of Orange County: proper zoning, low taxes, communication, transportation, education and even the arts. So what's missing? Nowhere do our "best and brightest" acknowledge that to continue to thrive, our economy needs to provide housing for all these entrepreneurs--and their employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1997
Your editorial of July 20, "Finding the Will to Help Homeless," about the Rev. Wiley Drake in Buena Park, touches on a very valid point: the need for a more comprehensive and regional strategy for dealing with homelessness. HomewardBound: The Orange County Homeless Coalition has been dealing with their problems for many years. The issue of shelter versus city codes is fraught with difficulties: It is the mission of religious entities to care for the needy, while cities must concern themselves with the safety of everyone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1997
Gov. Pete Wilson is vetoing a logical welfare-to-work plan, one that would get more people to work while protecting children, claiming it is too expensive. Meanwhile, he is proposing a $1-billion cut in income tax for people earning less than $100,000 (July 17). Is this his way of running for president in 2000? Cut taxes and starve children? And what about his timing? Here we are with the Legislature waiting to start summer vacations, with the state budget nowhere near settled, and he throws in a middle-class tax cut. How cynical can he get?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996
Re "Assembly OKs Concealed Gun Permits Bill," Feb. 1: National Rifle Assn. contributions to our Assembly members have now succeeded in assuring that all Californians will be armed and dangerous. LEE PODOLAK Orange Well, at last the Republicans gain control of the Assembly and begin to address the real problems facing our state. Apparently we need to put more guns on the street, protect ourselves against the terrible dangers of same-sex marriages and adopt the necessary rules to keep insurance companies from having to pay people injured in car accidents (Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1997
Your editorial of July 20, "Finding the Will to Help Homeless," about the Rev. Wiley Drake in Buena Park, touches on a very valid point: the need for a more comprehensive and regional strategy for dealing with homelessness. HomewardBound: The Orange County Homeless Coalition has been dealing with their problems for many years. The issue of shelter versus city codes is fraught with difficulties: It is the mission of religious entities to care for the needy, while cities must concern themselves with the safety of everyone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Podolak, a forceful community advocate who put homeless people on Orange County's agenda, will be remembered at a memorial service today by colleagues and peers who called her "irreplaceable." Podolak, 67, died Friday after a battle with cancer. The longtime resident of Orange spent nearly half her life working as a volunteer in various community organizations where she did everything from licking envelopes to pestering legislators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1993
I cannot understand where Janie Cowlin (Letters, Oct. 20) got her information. She claims that Proposition 168 is "a guise by the state government to gain more control over local government." Proposition 168 has absolutely nothing to do with state control--rather it is an amendment to the Constitution dealing strictly with local development. Proposition 168 simply removes one barrier to the construction of affordable housing--that of forcing a vote every time a project is proposed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1992
"TRW Deal Seen as Job-Saving Model for State" (May 14): Your article outlines rent subsidies given to a large corporation to entice it to keep some 1,200 jobs in Orange, yet very little mention is made of one of the biggest reasons businesses large and small give for leaving Orange County, and indeed, for leaving California--the lack of housing their employees can afford. Aside from the city's program of low-interest loans to first-time home buyers, there is very little chance for housing affordable to our job force.
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