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NEWS
September 29, 1994
I am personally devastated by the most recent verdict in the case of Lee Prentiss versus the city of South Pasadena (July 30). In 1990, when I served as mayor, Prentiss was hastily issued a building permit that did not receive environmental review or comply with the state Historic Building Code standards. Upon this notice, the permit was revoked at the behest of the majority of the council. Prentiss' politics were not the issue. The issue was an addition of 2,661 square feet to the front of a historic 3,600-plus-square-foot home.
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NEWS
September 29, 1994
I am personally devastated by the most recent verdict in the case of Lee Prentiss versus the city of South Pasadena (July 30). In 1990, when I served as mayor, Prentiss was hastily issued a building permit that did not receive environmental review or comply with the state Historic Building Code standards. Upon this notice, the permit was revoked at the behest of the majority of the council. Prentiss' politics were not the issue. The issue was an addition of 2,661 square feet to the front of a historic 3,600-plus-square-foot home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1994 | RICK HOLGUIN
A former mayor of South Pasadena on Monday asked for--and received--minimal punitive damages against the three city officials he had sued. "I don't believe in vengeance," said former Mayor Lee. D. Prentiss, who won a $1.2-million verdict against the city Friday for general and compensatory damages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1994 | RICK HOLGUIN
A former mayor of South Pasadena on Monday asked for--and received--minimal punitive damages against the three city officials he had sued. "I don't believe in vengeance," said former Mayor Lee. D. Prentiss, who won a $1.2-million verdict against the city Friday for general and compensatory damages.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The South Pasadena City Council moved to revoke a former mayor's building permit against the advice of the city attorney, two key witnesses have testified. The testimony came last week in Pasadena Superior Court as the trial began in the case of former Mayor Lee D. Prentiss, who claims the city pulled his building permit for political, not planning, reasons, and thus violated his civil rights. All the defendants have denied the charges as ridiculous in interviews during the past year.
NEWS
July 22, 1993 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The former mayor of South Pasadena has his building permit back this week after winning a ruling from the state Supreme Court that has ramifications for historic buildings throughout California. Former Mayor Lee Prentiss now has permission to expand his 86-year-old Craftsman-style home, some of which has been sitting under tarps during Prentiss' three-year legal battle against the city. "They say you can't fight City Hall," Prentiss said triumphantly. "Well, you can. And you can beat it."
NEWS
September 5, 1985
After about half an hour of public soul searching, the South Pasadena City Council voted 3-2 to approve a salary increase for council members. The increase will double council salaries to $300 a month, effective after the municipal election next April. Councilmen David Margrave, Lee Prentiss and Ted Shaw approved the measure, saying that members had not been granted a pay hike for several years.
NEWS
February 27, 1986
The city will buy American-made goods whenever possible under a policy adopted last week by the City Council. The policy was proposed by Councilman Lee Prentiss, who said he was concerned about the nation's foreign trade deficit. "We have to take care of our own people first," Prentiss said. The council approved the measure 3 to 1, with Councilman David Margrave dissenting. The policy does not apply to products purchased through bids because that would violate state and federal law, City Atty.
NEWS
December 23, 1990
A private architect will be hired to make the final decision on a proposed three-story, 1,750-square-foot addition to the Oaklawn District estate of Lee Prentiss, a former mayor of South Pasadena. The council agreed Wednesday that it lacked the expertise to judge whether Prentiss' building plans violate state guidelines on the alteration of historical buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1990
Prosecutors said Friday they do not expect to file criminal charges in connection with a South Pasadena party last month at which the sons of several community leaders were arrested for allegedly disturbing the peace and resisting an officer. Deputy Dist. Atty. James R. Simpson said a final decision will be made Monday, but there appeared to be insufficient evidence against John Bernardi Jr., 22, son of the city manager; Bryan Lee Prentiss, 22, son of the former mayor; Thomas D.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The South Pasadena City Council moved to revoke a former mayor's building permit against the advice of the city attorney, two key witnesses have testified. The testimony came last week in Pasadena Superior Court as the trial began in the case of former Mayor Lee D. Prentiss, who claims the city pulled his building permit for political, not planning, reasons, and thus violated his civil rights. All the defendants have denied the charges as ridiculous in interviews during the past year.
NEWS
July 22, 1993 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The former mayor of South Pasadena has his building permit back this week after winning a ruling from the state Supreme Court that has ramifications for historic buildings throughout California. Former Mayor Lee Prentiss now has permission to expand his 86-year-old Craftsman-style home, some of which has been sitting under tarps during Prentiss' three-year legal battle against the city. "They say you can't fight City Hall," Prentiss said triumphantly. "Well, you can. And you can beat it."
NEWS
January 28, 1988
Former Mayor Lee Prentiss has become the second City Council incumbent to decide not to seek another term after his four-year term expires in April. Saying he was "following my original intent" in staying on the council for only a single term, Prentiss announced last week that he will not run in the April 12 election.
NEWS
May 13, 1993
City officials Monday asked the state Court of Appeal to reconsider a decision to let former Mayor Lee Prentiss expand his historic house. Prentiss won the latest round in a two-year legal battle against the city when the appeals court ruled two weeks ago that the city in 1990 had wrongfully revoked his permit to expand his 3,500-square-foot Oaklawn Avenue home.
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