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Lee R Devore

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1990 | TOM McQUEENEY
Capt. Lee R. DeVore had been a police officer for more than 20 years when he began noticing that the homeless people he was seeing were no longer mostly middle-aged, alcoholic men. Increasingly, he realized, they were families with young children--on the street with nowhere to go. So in 1984, he approached Fran Lundquist, founder of the Sheepfold shelters for homeless women with children, with an offer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1990 | TOM McQUEENEY
Capt. Lee R. DeVore had been a police officer for more than 20 years when he began noticing that the homeless people he was seeing were no longer mostly middle-aged, alcoholic men. Increasingly, he realized, they were families with young children--on the street with nowhere to go. So in 1984, he approached Fran Lundquist, founder of the Sheepfold shelters for homeless women with children, with an offer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1992 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge on Monday refused to dismiss murder charges against four men on trial for the shooting death of a Fullerton undercover detective during a drug sting operation. However, in what a Fullerton Police official described as a "disappointing" ruling, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge J. Kimball Walker dropped some of the drug charges against three of the defendants, as well as charges that they had been lying in wait, a special circumstance allegation that can result in the death penalty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1992 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three reputed drug dealers were spared the death penalty Thursday by a jury that recommended they be sentenced to life in prison for the murder of undercover Fullerton Police Detective Tommy De La Rosa in a drug sting that went awry. The Norwalk Superior Court jury deliberated less than three hours before rejecting the death penalty for Raul Meza, 41, Jose Yuriar, 26, and Jesus Araclio, 31, all of Los Angeles County, despite a prosecutor's plea that the men deserved to die in the gas chamber.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three reputed drug dealers were spared the death penalty Thursday by a jury that recommended they be sentenced to life in prison for the murder of undercover Fullerton police Detective Tommy De La Rosa in a drug sting that went awry. The Norwalk Superior Court jury deliberated less than three hours before rejecting the death penalty for Raul Meza, 41, Jose Yuriar, 26, and Jesus Araclio, 31, all of Los Angeles County, despite a prosecutor's plea that the men deserved to die in the gas chamber.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1991 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four people accused of killing a Fullerton narcotics officer during an undercover operation that turned into a bloody gun battle have been convicted on felony cocaine charges but acquitted of first-degree murder. After 1 1/2 days of deliberation, a Norwalk Superior Court jury returned the verdicts Monday in the first of two trials stemming from the death of Detective Tommy De La Rosa outside a Downey home on June 21, 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1992 | DAN WEIKEL and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The judge overseeing the tense trial of four men accused of murdering Fullerton narcotics officer Tommy De La Rosa during a sting operation held the dead officer's partner in contempt of court Wednesday for asserting on the witness stand that the jury was not getting the truth. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three men were sentenced Wednesday to life in prison for murdering an undercover Fullerton police detective, but only after a judge blasted prosecutors' handling of the case and agreed that the trial amounted to a "sophisticated lynching." Using unusually harsh and blunt language, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge J.
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