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Lee Ritenour

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
It's easy to take Lee Ritenour for granted. His reputation as the "Captain Fingers" of the guitar--the player whose nonpareil technical excellence made him the wizard of the recording studios for nearly a decade before he took off on his own solo career--may have overshadowed his more subtle musical skills. But Ritenour is more than a digital dexterity machine, more than a musical chameleon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1995 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They both grew up in Southern California's South Bay. As teen-agers,they hung out at the same music store, Mr. B's For Music on the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Later, they took turns headlining at the same club, the Baked Potato in North Hollywood. And as top-call studio guitarists, they performed on some of the same albums (for Steely Dan, Barbra Streisand and others), though on separate tracks.
NEWS
March 20, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Guitarist Lee Ritenour was one of the pioneers in laying out the framework for the music generally -- if somewhat vaguely -- described as contemporary jazz. In the Ritenour view, this has meant a combination of funk and R&B rhythms, riff-based melodies and stretched-out harmonies, delivered in highly virtuosic fashion with an occasional sprinkling of Brazilian seasoning.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guitarist Lee Ritenour sounds happy on the phone just before Christmas, and why shouldn't he? He's moved back into his Malibu house, which has been under renovation for two years. Despite a garage full of boxes to unpack, it's good to be home, finally, for the holidays. Ritenour has other reasons to be happy as 1997 draws to a close. His new record label, i.e. Music, is moving ahead full steam.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
Jazz at the Cocoanut Grove? Sounds like something out of the Twilight Zone. But there it was, a full-fledged jazz concert featuring Lee Ritenour, Bob James, Ernie Watts, Tuck & Patti and a host of others. As a matter of fact, if the recent news reports about Donald Trump buying the Ambassador Hotel are true, he should have been at the establishment's venerable old nightclub Friday night.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about music for The Times.
Lee Ritenour has never been a big fan of musical tributes to personal heroes. "Tributes in general seem to come off trite, and never on the level of the original," said Ritenour, one of modern music's best known instrumentalists, who plays Wednesday at the Universal Amphitheatre. Nonetheless, for a long time there had been a thought in the back of his mind to pay homage in a recording to his first major influence, Wes Montgomery.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guitarist Lee Ritenour is enjoying the best of both worlds. His solo project, the Wes Montgomery tribute album "Wes Bound" (GRP), as well as his group recording, Fourplay's "Between the Sheets" (Warner Bros.), have been firmly entrenched on Billboard's jazz albums charts since their releases last year. Long popular as a contemporary guitarist, Ritenour, who appears with Fourplay tonight at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, has never been more visible.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1986
Lee Ritenour claims to be a "what's happening" kind of player but being wealthy enough to afford every new electronic toy in the music store will never make his music more soulful or innovative. All this talk of virtuosity and high technology reminds one of Caspar Weinberger justifying his need for elaborate and more expensive war machinery. So, what has Ritenour accomplished by putting a glossy new veneer on the same old muzak? SEAN FULLERTON Pasadena
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE
* * Lee Ritenour, "Wes Bound," GRP. Guitarist Ritenour's tribute to Wes Montgomery, with its orchestral arrangements and laid-back tempos, apes the late guitarist's least satisfying period: the over-produced sessions he did for Creed Taylor's CTI label. Still, Ritenour's re-creation of Montgomery's tone and attack is genuine enough to be pleasing, and he even makes Bob Marley's "Waiting in Vain" (with a vocal by Maxi Priest) fit the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1998 | Don Heckman
Whether the participants like it or not, these two new albums are inextricably related. Guitarist Lee Ritenour, one of the founding members (with keyboardist Bob James, drummer Harvey Mason and bassist Nathan East) of the all-star band Fourplay, left the group last year to take on the responsibility of running his own label, ie Records. He was replaced by another longtime studio veteran, guitarist Larry Carlton.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guitarist Lee Ritenour sounds happy on the phone just before Christmas, and why shouldn't he? He's moved back into his Malibu house, which has been under renovation for two years. Despite a garage full of boxes to unpack, it's good to be home, finally, for the holidays. Ritenour has other reasons to be happy as 1997 draws to a close. His new record label, i.e. Music, is moving ahead full steam.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guitarist Lee Ritenour has always carried the right credentials. Thursday, playing at the Ash Grove on the Santa Monica pier, he lived up to them. The 45-year-old, Hollywood-born Ritenour studied his craft early-on with the likes of Joe Pass and Howard Roberts, and has a well-publicized affinity for Wes Montgomery. As a studio heavy he's played for everyone from composer Oliver Nelson and saxophonist Sonny Rollins to Stevie Wonder and Barbra Streisand.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1995 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They both grew up in Southern California's South Bay. As teen-agers,they hung out at the same music store, Mr. B's For Music on the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Later, they took turns headlining at the same club, the Baked Potato in North Hollywood. And as top-call studio guitarists, they performed on some of the same albums (for Steely Dan, Barbra Streisand and others), though on separate tracks.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guitarist Lee Ritenour is enjoying the best of both worlds. His solo project, the Wes Montgomery tribute album "Wes Bound" (GRP), as well as his group recording, Fourplay's "Between the Sheets" (Warner Bros.), have been firmly entrenched on Billboard's jazz albums charts since their releases last year. Long popular as a contemporary guitarist, Ritenour, who appears with Fourplay tonight at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, has never been more visible.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE
FOURPLAY "Between the Sheets" Warner Bros. * 1/2 This is a big, soft marshmallow of a recording, all tease and no action, and a step down from Fourplay's highly successful debut album of last year. Its warm, cuddly songs are the perfect background music for a yuppie Sunday.
NEWS
March 20, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Guitarist Lee Ritenour was one of the pioneers in laying out the framework for the music generally -- if somewhat vaguely -- described as contemporary jazz. In the Ritenour view, this has meant a combination of funk and R&B rhythms, riff-based melodies and stretched-out harmonies, delivered in highly virtuosic fashion with an occasional sprinkling of Brazilian seasoning.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE
FOURPLAY "Between the Sheets" Warner Bros. * 1/2 This is a big, soft marshmallow of a recording, all tease and no action, and a step down from Fourplay's highly successful debut album of last year. Its warm, cuddly songs are the perfect background music for a yuppie Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE
* * Lee Ritenour, "Wes Bound," GRP. Guitarist Ritenour's tribute to Wes Montgomery, with its orchestral arrangements and laid-back tempos, apes the late guitarist's least satisfying period: the over-produced sessions he did for Creed Taylor's CTI label. Still, Ritenour's re-creation of Montgomery's tone and attack is genuine enough to be pleasing, and he even makes Bob Marley's "Waiting in Vain" (with a vocal by Maxi Priest) fit the program.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about music for The Times.
Lee Ritenour has never been a big fan of musical tributes to personal heroes. "Tributes in general seem to come off trite, and never on the level of the original," said Ritenour, one of modern music's best known instrumentalists, who plays Wednesday at the Universal Amphitheatre. Nonetheless, for a long time there had been a thought in the back of his mind to pay homage in a recording to his first major influence, Wes Montgomery.
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