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Lee Seitz

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January 18, 1993 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Seitz operates her wheelchair with her big toe. She sleeps with a respirator to help her breathe. A ventilator pumps air through a mask to prevent her from choking. Left a paraplegic by polio in 1951, Seitz, 65, depends on so much machinery for survival that she calls herself a bionic woman. Nevertheless, the resilient Reseda grandmother heads the Polio Survivors Foundation, which last year spent $78,000 on motorized carts, wheelchairs, hospital beds and other equipment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Seitz, neatly dressed in a blue outfit, sits physically fragile and mostly paralyzed in her wheelchair at a luncheon of the Polio Survivors Foundation. A man sitting next to her must help the 70-year-old woman lift a spoon to her mouth--the sort of assistance she has needed since she was 24--as the other polio survivors at the gathering speak admiringly about all Seitz has done for them, such as raising funds to buy the wheelchairs they use.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Seitz, neatly dressed in a blue outfit, sits physically fragile and mostly paralyzed in her wheelchair at a luncheon of the Polio Survivors Foundation. A man sitting next to her must help the 70-year-old woman lift a spoon to her mouth--the sort of assistance she has needed since she was 24--as the other polio survivors at the gathering speak admiringly about all Seitz has done for them, such as raising funds to buy the wheelchairs they use.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1994
I would like to write a response to your editorial "A Frightful Disease is Banished" (Oct. 1). There are many, many thousands of survivors of the polio epidemic that occurred before the discovery of the miraculous vaccine by Dr. Jonas Salk and Dr. Albert Sabin. Most of these thousands of survivors are now suffering with an unforeseen condition known as post-polio syndrome, which is almost more debilitating than the original onset of this dreaded disease, because age has not been a kind factor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1994
I would like to write a response to your editorial "A Frightful Disease is Banished" (Oct. 1). There are many, many thousands of survivors of the polio epidemic that occurred before the discovery of the miraculous vaccine by Dr. Jonas Salk and Dr. Albert Sabin. Most of these thousands of survivors are now suffering with an unforeseen condition known as post-polio syndrome, which is almost more debilitating than the original onset of this dreaded disease, because age has not been a kind factor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1989 | PERRY C. RIDDLE
Lee Seitz won the battle against confinement when she got her first motorized wheelchair more than 20 years ago. She works at the Polio Survivors Foundation office to expand the lives of people who are confined and to help others who are affected by post-polio syndrome. Seitz, 61, lives in Reseda. I contracted polio in August of 1951. I was 24, and my daughter had just turned 4. The older you are when you get a disease like this, the harder it is on you. I was completely paralyzed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1993 | JAMES ZOLTAK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The suffering caused by polio is largely thought of in the past tense, but polio survivors bear painful testament to the present-day misery wrought by the disease. Bound to wheelchairs and sometimes too weak to propel them, or dependent on leg braces and regularly in pain, polio survivors range in age from their late 30s to 70s.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | DALIA KEYSER, Keyser is a Tarzana free-lance writer
Roberta Rak had all but forgotten about polio after doctors removed her leg brace in 1962. "I was too busy making up for lost time, doing all the things normal kids do," said the Simi Valley woman, who contracted the virus when she was 6 months old. "But, now that I'm 37, I have pain and fatigue to remind me. I'm back to a leg brace again. And I use crutches," said Rak. The return of pain, fatigue and weakness 30 to 40 years after an acute attack has been dubbed post-polio syndrome.
NEWS
January 18, 1993 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Seitz operates her wheelchair with her big toe. She sleeps with a respirator to help her breathe. A ventilator pumps air through a mask to prevent her from choking. Left a paraplegic by polio in 1951, Seitz, 65, depends on so much machinery for survival that she calls herself a bionic woman. Nevertheless, the resilient Reseda grandmother heads the Polio Survivors Foundation, which last year spent $78,000 on motorized carts, wheelchairs, hospital beds and other equipment.
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