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Lee Shin Bom

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July 12, 1987 | United Press International
A prominent South Korean dissident who spent four years in exile in the United States returned home Saturday, marking another milestone in the country's process of democratization. Lee Shin Bom, 37, an aide to leading opposition figure Kim Dae Jung, was the first dissident to return from exile under an amnesty announced July 1 by President Chun Doo Hwan, which took effect Friday. "Until today, I have lived as a man without a country," Lee said.
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NEWS
July 12, 1987 | United Press International
A prominent South Korean dissident who spent four years in exile in the United States returned home Saturday, marking another milestone in the country's process of democratization. Lee Shin Bom, 37, an aide to leading opposition figure Kim Dae Jung, was the first dissident to return from exile under an amnesty announced July 1 by President Chun Doo Hwan, which took effect Friday. "Until today, I have lived as a man without a country," Lee said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1987 | STEPHEN BRAUN and PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writers
Echoing the demands of student demonstrators in the streets of South Korea, about 700 Korean-Americans converged Sunday on a park in central Los Angeles to press for democratic reforms and an end to martial law in their homeland. Wearing belts of green, the color that symbolizes peace to Koreans, marchers gathered near dusk in a soccer field at Ardmore Recreation Center, in the center of Koreatown, hoisting aloft banners that read, "Down with Dictatorship!" "No tear gas!"
OPINION
February 15, 1987 | Jack Epstein, Jack Epstein of Berkeley writes on Asian and Latin America issues
From a war-wrecked agricultural pauper, South Korea has emerged as the "next Japan." Its cities gleam with steel plants, automated factories and skyscrapers. But this hard-working nation of 42 million may falter in Japan's footsteps because of a problem its Asian neighbor lacks--a restive work force. Church groups, opposition politicians and students are mounting a labor-rights movement that could undermine Korea's "economic miracle."
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