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Lee Stevens

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SPORTS
July 23, 1990
Lee Stevens, who batted .300 and drove in six runs in his first week in the major leagues, has been named Angel of the Week by The Times' Orange County Edition. Stevens was called up Monday from triple-A Edmonton to replace first baseman Wally Joyner, who was placed on the 15-day disabled list. Stevens, 23, singled in his first major league at-bat, drove in a run with another single in his second, and doubled in his third, going three for four in his first game.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
The filmgoer was noticeably upset. He didn't like a moment in "Lincoln. " More specifically, he didn't like the final moments of "Lincoln. " "I don't understand why it didn't just end when Lincoln is walking down the hall and the butler gives him his hat," he said. "Why did I need to see him dying on the bed? I have no idea what Spielberg was trying to do. " The man on the mini-rant wasn't some multiplex loudmouth. He was actor Samuel L. Jackson, and he was just getting started.
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NEWS
February 4, 1989
Lee Stevens, who began as a mail clerk with the giant William Morris Agency and three decades later became the talent group's sixth president, died Thursday night of cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. He was 58.
SPORTS
May 31, 1999 | From Associated Press
For the first time all year, the Texas Rangers won a low-scoring game. Lee Stevens singled home the go-ahead run in the eighth inning and Texas beat the Minnesota Twins on Sunday, 3-2. The Rangers had been 0-11 when they were held to less than four runs. "It's nerve-racking, but when it's over, it's fun. That kind of a game helped," Texas Manager Johnny Oates said. "Success breeds confidence, and right now, this ballclub is showing a lot of confidence."
SPORTS
January 28, 1992 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having lost first baseman Wally Joyner to the Kansas City Royals as a free agent, the Angels are now concerned about an injury to the right wrist of successor Lee Stevens. Although there was no announcement by the club, team physician Lewis Yocum placed the wrist in a cast two weeks ago and will make another evaluation when the cast comes off Feb. 5.
SPORTS
January 28, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The sore right wrist of Angel first baseman Lee Stevens has been put in a cast as a protective measure, his agent said.
SPORTS
October 5, 1991
So the Angels want to re-sign Wally Joyner, do they? Good luck. He'll probably want a five-year contract for $50 million. Lee Stevens can do the job. Dick Schofield, too? Unfortunately, this nice young man will always be a good-field, not-much-hit player no matter what batting stance he applies. Gary DiSarcina can do the job. And Dave Winfield? So he doesn't want to be a designated hitter, and the number of hits he has gotten recently seems to prove that. Almost anyone can do the job. Let's build for the Angels' future with young, hungry ballplayers, not hungry-for-money players who don't seem to care where the team finishes.
SPORTS
September 1, 1992 | ROBYN NORWOOD
When Lee Stevens had about 200 at-bats and a batting average under .200, the Angels figured they had given him enough of a chance to prove himself. "It was obvious he wasn't going anywhere but down the tube," Manager Buck Rodgers said. Stevens had lost his aggressiveness and wasn't showing much willingness to learn or adjust, Rodgers said. Then, in the last month, hitting instructor Rod Carew suggested Stevens rest the bat on his shoulder. Stevens tried it and was hitting .
SPORTS
February 6, 1992 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cast on Angel first baseman Lee Stevens' right wrist was removed Wednesday by team orthopedist Lewis Yocum, and Yocum has told the Angels that Stevens should be ready for spring training. The Angels, who planned for Stevens to replace Wally Joyner at first base after Joyner signed as a free agent with the Kansas City Royals, were concerned when Stevens complained of soreness after resuming batting practice last month.
SPORTS
January 22, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Montreal Expos, pleading a communications breakdown in trading the Angels a player who was quitting baseball to join Fresno State's football team, hurriedly substituted right-handed pitcher Keith Morrison on Thursday. The transaction, after a flurry of phone calls between Angel and Expo officials, compensates the Angels for the loss of pitcher Jeff Tuss.
SPORTS
September 22, 1998 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Both grew up in the Angel organization. To hear them talk, not much has changed. "Lee Stevens was large and could hit the ball a long way," Texas Ranger second baseman Mark McLemore said. Three cubicles away, Stevens said: "Mark was always enthusiastic." They briefly looked back on their younger days, when they were part of the Angels' future. Then it was back to the present. They were in Anaheim, fighting for the American League West title.
SPORTS
September 27, 1997 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee Stevens has been here before. In Anaheim Stadium, playing first base. But not playing here for the Angels seems to be the key. Stevens was the hero for the Texas Rangers against his former teammates for the second consecutive night. His seventh-inning grand slam gave the Rangers a 8-4 victory Friday in front of 17,161. It was his third home run in two nights against the Angels.
SPORTS
September 26, 1997 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was nothing left for the Angels but to pack a couple bags, return home, play a few games and ponder the future. Their past, though, came to back to town as well. Lee Stevens, once considered the Angel first baseman of the future--albeit briefly--homered twice in Texas' 8-5 victory Thursday before an announced crowd of 21,292 at Anaheim Stadium. It spoiled the start of the Angels' last series of 1997. When they break up Sunday, their paths may vary. Certainly Tim Salmon and Garret Anderson don't need a fortune teller.
SPORTS
September 7, 1997 | From Associated Press
Barring a miracle, Pat Hentgen won't win 20 games again this season. But last year's Cy Young Award winner looked as good as ever to Texas Manager Johnny Oates on Saturday. "Give Hentgen credit," Oates said after Hentgen yielded six hits in eight innings in Toronto's 2-1 victory over the Rangers. "He may have struggled a bit with some of our hitters. But he didn't win a Cy Young Award just by getting 22-year-olds out."
SPORTS
April 20, 1997 | ROSS NEWHAN
Five years after he was expected to replace Wally Joyner as the Angels' first baseman, Lee Stevens is playing a pivotal role for the Texas Rangers as the replacement for injured Will Clark. It has been a circuitous odyssey in which Stevens failed in his 1992 bid to replace Joyner and subsequently was released from the Montreal and Toronto minor league systems.
SPORTS
March 31, 1993 | Associated Press
First baseman Lee Stevens of the Montreal Expos was put on waivers Tuesday for the purpose of giving him his unconditional release. Stevens led the Expos this spring with 10 runs batted in, but was batting only .200 with 10 hits in 50 at-bats. "It's a business, but they're making a big mistake," Stevens said as he fought back tears. "There was no indication this was going to happen. When Jack Clark arrived (Monday), I thought it would have some impact on me but not this severe.
SPORTS
January 22, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Montreal Expos, pleading a communications breakdown in trading the Angels a player who was quitting baseball to join Fresno State's football team, hurriedly substituted right-handed pitcher Keith Morrison on Thursday. The transaction, after a flurry of phone calls between Angel and Expo officials, compensates the Angels for the loss of pitcher Jeff Tuss.
SPORTS
January 16, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel first baseman Lee Stevens, haunted by the ghost of Wally Joyner, was traded Friday to the Montreal Expos for minor league pitcher Jeff Tuss. "I think it was the best thing that could have happened to my career," said Stevens, who batted .221 with seven home runs and 37 runs batted in last season. "It just seemed like everything that could go bad, did go bad. There were a number of factors that went against me, but that one thing never went away.
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