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Lee Weyer

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NEWS
July 5, 1988 | Associated Press
National League umpire Lee Weyer died of a massive heart attack in a suburb of San Francisco Monday night, the league announced today. Weyer, 51, who lived in Hollywood, was visiting the home of fellow umpire Ed Montague after working Monday's game between the San Francisco Giants and the Chicago Cubs. "He was playing basketball with Montague's children when he complained of shortness of breath.
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SPORTS
July 6, 1988 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
Lee Weyer, a National League umpire for 26 years, died of what appeared to be a heart attack Monday night while visiting the home of fellow umpire Ed Montague in the San Francisco suburb of San Mateo. Weyer, 51, had worked Monday afternoon's game between the Giants and Chicago Cubs at Candlestick Park and had been playing basketball with Montague's children when he complained of shortness of breath and went into the house to make a phone call.
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SPORTS
July 6, 1988 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
Lee Weyer, a National League umpire for 26 years, died of what appeared to be a heart attack Monday night while visiting the home of fellow umpire Ed Montague in the San Francisco suburb of San Mateo. Weyer, 51, had worked Monday afternoon's game between the Giants and Chicago Cubs at Candlestick Park and had been playing basketball with Montague's children when he complained of shortness of breath and went into the house to make a phone call.
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | Associated Press
National League umpire Lee Weyer died of a massive heart attack in a suburb of San Francisco Monday night, the league announced today. Weyer, 51, who lived in Hollywood, was visiting the home of fellow umpire Ed Montague after working Monday's game between the San Francisco Giants and the Chicago Cubs. "He was playing basketball with Montague's children when he complained of shortness of breath.
SPORTS
August 7, 1988 | SCOTT MILLER
You're sitting in San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium under the blazing sun, hot dog in one hand and beverage in the other, and there's a close play at the plate. Necks crane, eyes bulge, and the place is full of disbelief. And then, from somewhere behind you, you hear it: "Collect the ump!" Collect the ump? For this, you can thank La Mesa's Tom Nielsen, a 39-year-old building contractor who has produced a 64-card set of umpire trading cards that is being sold throughout the country.
SPORTS
August 28, 1988 | SCOTT MILLER
You're sitting in San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium under the blazing sun, hot dog in one hand and beverage in the other, and there's a close play at the plate. Necks crane, eyes bulge, and the place is full of disbelief. And then, from somewhere behind you, you hear it: "Collect the ump!" Collect the ump? For this, you can thank Tom Nielsen of La Mesa, a 39-year-old building contractor who has produced a 64-card set of umpire trading cards that are being sold throughout the country.
SPORTS
April 13, 1986 | Associated Press
The rookie learned three valuable lessons in his major league debut at Houston's Astrodome. First: Never agitate an umpire early in a game, especially when the umpire is the crew chief. San Francisco Giants' teammate Chris Brown whispered the pearl of big league wisdom into the rookie's ear moments after he questioned plate umpire Lee Weyer's called third strike in the third inning of Giants-Houston Astros opener last Tuesday. Crew chiefs, Brown lectured, often possess long memories.
NEWS
April 2, 1996 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The start of the National League baseball season was clouded Monday when veteran umpire John McSherry, 51, collapsed in the first inning of a game between the Cincinnati Reds and Montreal Expos at Cincinnati's Riverfront Stadium and died of a heart attack. McSherry, beginning his 25th National League season, was working behind the plate when he called time, waved for umpire Steve Rippley at first base, then turned and began walking toward a gate behind the plate.
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