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OPINION
February 24, 2010
Liberal groups and the American Bar Assn. are opposing President Obama's nomination of Sharon Browne, an attorney at the Sacramento-based Pacific Legal Foundation, to the board of the Legal Services Corp., which oversees legal aid for the poor. So far, however, the critics haven't made a persuasive case. No more than six members of the corporation's 11-person board can come from the same party, and Browne was recommended for a minority seat by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 11, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Eight senators who have spent weeks trying to write a bipartisan bill to overhaul immigration laws have privately agreed on the most contentious part of the draft - how to offer legal status to the nation's 11 million illegal immigrants. According to aides familiar with the closed-door negotiations, the bill would require illegal immigrants to register with Homeland Security Department authorities, file federal income taxes for their time in America and pay a still-to-be-determined fine.
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OPINION
February 23, 2009 | Clare Pastore, Clare Pastore is a law professor at the USC Gould School of Law and a former legal services lawyer.
Maria de Leon and her husband, Jesus Batista, were on the verge of homelessness when they arrived at the nonprofit Inner City Law Center on skid row. They'd always paid their rent on time and never complained to their landlord, even as conditions in their unit deteriorated. But then their landlord fell into foreclosure and the bank holding the mortgage attempted -- illegally -- to evict the family. A man who had promised to help with the eviction disappeared with $1,400 of the couple's money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2012 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
Nearly four decades ago, 18 friends came together to offer free legal services in Los Angeles' Fairfax district. They were lawyers and legal secretaries and law students and social workers, and they found themselves a storefront on Fairfax Avenue. Each month, they chipped in $5 apiece, which was enough to cover rent, electricity and phones. No one got paid a dime. All volunteered time. Theirs was a tiny operation with a name huge with hope: Bet Tzedek, which in Hebrew means House of Justice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2012 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
Nearly four decades ago, 18 friends came together to offer free legal services in Los Angeles' Fairfax district. They were lawyers and legal secretaries and law students and social workers, and they found themselves a storefront on Fairfax Avenue. Each month, they chipped in $5 apiece, which was enough to cover rent, electricity and phones. No one got paid a dime. All volunteered time. Theirs was a tiny operation with a name huge with hope: Bet Tzedek, which in Hebrew means House of Justice.
OPINION
July 5, 1998
The U.S. Supreme Court's term ended last month with rulings on sexual harassment that drew praise for their clarity and sensibility. But the court's earlier decision on legal services for the poor was dismaying if unsurprising. The justices cast a long shadow over a major source of legal aid funding by ruling that interest earned on the money that clients often must deposit with their lawyers for short periods belongs to the clients. Were that decision made in a vacuum, it would seem sensible.
NEWS
May 28, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Poor immigration amnesty applicants can continue to receive subsidized legal aid until a court determines if a 1986 immigration-reform law intended to deny them that low-cost service, a federal judge has ruled. U.S. District Judge Thelton E. Henderson on Friday temporarily put off nationwide plans to withhold legal aid from amnesty applicants after finding the law vague and deciding that implementing it could pose a severe hardship on people who face eviction and other civil matters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1985
The Legal Aid Society of Orange County has received a total of $300,000 in federal grants for pilot programs to determine the most financially efficient way to provide the county's poor with legal assistance. An additional $150,000 federal contract also is expected to be awarded soon to the nonprofit county agency. The grants were awarded by the Washington-based Legal Services Corp.
NEWS
August 5, 1993
As part of a city-sponsored program to bring free legal aid to those who cannot pay for it, a team from the nonprofit law center Bet Tzedek will visit the People Coordinated Multipurpose Senior Center on Aug. 24. Bet Tzedek, "The House of Justice" in Hebrew, specializes in the problems of the low-income, elderly and disabled, such as SSI, Social Security and other government benefits, landlord-tenant problems, nursing home problems and consumer fraud.
NEWS
August 17, 1989
A decision on moving a legal aid office from Pasadena to West Covina has been delayed at least until Monday while options that could keep the office in Pasadena are explored. Lauralea Saddick, executive director of Legal Services Programs for Pasadena and San Gabriel-Pomona Valley, said the organization has asked the city of Pasadena to help find space in city facilities or elsewhere in the northern part of Pasadena. The request was made after City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of residents in Los Angeles' poorest neighborhoods will get new legal help in fighting high-stakes eviction cases involving slumlords and foreclosures under a pilot project approved by the state's judicial leaders Friday. The new Eviction Legal Assistance Center at Los Angeles County Superior Court's downtown civil courthouse will provide legal representation to about 15,000 people facing eviction over three years, according to legal aid groups, which will be jointly running the center.
OPINION
September 25, 2010
Federal policy on immigration has tilted toward enforcement in recent years, and the number of deportation proceedings has risen sharply. As a result, the nation's detention centers, where immigrants often are held while their cases are adjudicated, have become increasingly overburdened. One of the many negative consequences of the 60% increase in the number of people held since 2004 is detainees' dwindling access to legal counsel. Having a lawyer makes a difference. A 2005 Migration Policy Institute study found that the odds of success double when detainees seeking to become lawful permanent citizens have attorneys.
NATIONAL
September 14, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
Even as the Obama administration seeks to create a more humane system of detention for illegal immigrants, most continue to be held in rural jails without ready access to legal representation, a human rights group says in a report to be released today. In a survey of immigration detention facilities nationwide, the Chicago-based National Immigrant Justice Center found that more than half did not offer detainees information about their rights, and 78% prohibited private phone calls with lawyers.
OPINION
February 24, 2010
Liberal groups and the American Bar Assn. are opposing President Obama's nomination of Sharon Browne, an attorney at the Sacramento-based Pacific Legal Foundation, to the board of the Legal Services Corp., which oversees legal aid for the poor. So far, however, the critics haven't made a persuasive case. No more than six members of the corporation's 11-person board can come from the same party, and Browne was recommended for a minority seat by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
California is embarking on an unprecedented civil court experiment to pay for attorneys to represent poor litigants who find themselves battling powerful adversaries in vital matters affecting their livelihoods and families. The program is the first in the nation to recognize a right to representation in key civil cases and provide it for people fighting eviction, loss of child custody, domestic abuse or neglect of the elderly or disabled. Advocates for the poor say the law, which Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed this week, levels the legal playing field and gives underprivileged litigants a better shot at attaining justice against unscrupulous landlords, abusive spouses, predatory lenders and other foes.
WORLD
April 16, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The first trial in November's Mumbai terrorist attacks was abruptly adjourned an hour after police pulled a large cloth off the head of the defendant to reveal the blinking, scruffy-bearded Pakistani who police say is the lone surviving gunman. The presiding judge ordered the much-anticipated proceedings delayed after dismissing the defense lawyer for suspect Ajmal Amir Kasab for a conflict of interest. Trial Judge M.L. Tahiliyani said legal aid lawyer Anjali Waghmare failed to disclose that she had agreed to represent a victim in a compensation claim case, who is also a witness against Kasab.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
Richard Massey's suburban Anaheim home was valued at $700,000 two years ago when the bills for his cancer surgery came due and he had to tap the equity to pay them. The cosmetics company executive had lost his job and health insurance just before getting ill -- the start of a run of bad luck that accelerated with the real estate meltdown and has left the 50-year-old and his disabled wife facing eviction from their foreclosed home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
Richard Massey's suburban Anaheim home was valued at $700,000 two years ago when the bills for his cancer surgery came due and he had to tap the equity to pay them. The cosmetics company executive had lost his job and health insurance just before getting ill -- the start of a run of bad luck that accelerated with the real estate meltdown and has left the 50-year-old and his disabled wife facing eviction from their foreclosed home.
OPINION
February 23, 2009 | Clare Pastore, Clare Pastore is a law professor at the USC Gould School of Law and a former legal services lawyer.
Maria de Leon and her husband, Jesus Batista, were on the verge of homelessness when they arrived at the nonprofit Inner City Law Center on skid row. They'd always paid their rent on time and never complained to their landlord, even as conditions in their unit deteriorated. But then their landlord fell into foreclosure and the bank holding the mortgage attempted -- illegally -- to evict the family. A man who had promised to help with the eviction disappeared with $1,400 of the couple's money.
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