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MAGAZINE
October 9, 1988
Since I have never been in the position of wanting to adopt a child, I do not feel qualified to judge or even offer an opinion on the legal services offered in Karen Stabiner's "The Baby Brokers." What troubles me is the search for the "perfect" family, be it adoption or surrogate parenting. What happens to the legal contract if the child turns out not to be perfect--physically handicapped or mentally handicapped--at birth? Are adoptive parents still as eager to make this child a part of their family?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2010 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
County transportation officials have spent tens of millions of dollars on legal fees without adequate financial controls or oversight to evaluate and limit the costs, according to an audit released Wednesday. The review, by the inspector general of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, found that MTA attorneys had no written procedures for managing cases and routinely spent more than $200,000 for outside legal work without getting permission from the board of directors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1997
Re "Tequila Importer Agrees to Remove West Hollywood Statue," Jan. 10: Being kicked in the teeth by Mayor Paul Koretz of West Hollywood after agreeing to remove the Mexican art monument hardly served the agenda of local residents who want the art removed in a timely fashion. Koretz's public statement regarding financial responsibility for the monument's removal was careless and highly inflammatory. Despite an initial $400,000 corporate investment and a legal contract that clearly states West Hollywood's responsibility for the removal of the art, Heublein agreed to "partner" with the city to share in the cost.
OPINION
May 19, 2008
Last week's California Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage prompted an avalanche of mail, with roughly the same number of responses from each side. Given the intense reader interest in the topic, we are devoting today's page to it. Eryn Brown Letters Editor -- Re "Gay marriage ban overturned," May 16 As an attorney, I am surprised that it took so long for a court to reach the simple decision that if that state's constitution or the U.S. Constitution includes an equal-protection clause, then gay marriage must be legal.
TRAVEL
November 18, 2001
James Gilden has given a rather one-sided opinion in his column "Refunds Now the Target of Customer Complaints" (Nov. 4). He neglects to consider that the airlines took an enormous hit after the Sept. 11 tragedy, so tremendous that the U.S. government saw fit to provide bailout funds to cover some of the losses. Would he prefer that the American taxpayer cover the costs of voluntary changes on the part of airline customers, who, however kindhearted their intentions, are not being forced to alter their plans for safety or other mandatory reasons?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1990
Quoting The Times ("Genetic Parents Win Sole Custody in Surrogate Case," Oct. 23): "The judge said a surrogate who is genetically unrelated to the child she carries does not acquire parental rights by virtue of having given birth to it." Is this what Judge Richard N. Parslow Jr. actually said, or is this a reporter's interpretation of the meaning of the decision? In either case, something is sadly missing here. I question whether anyone has the qualifications to make the judgment described in that quotation.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1987
With interest and considerable pleasure, I read Harry Bernstein's June 30 column, "Unions Didn't Cause Loss of Building Jobs." It is not often that what organized labor does and seeks is appraised objectively, especially in this present period when business and anti-union individuals and organizations have uncorked a vituperative campaign to block passage in the Congress of so-called double-breasting legislation. I was particularly pleased to see that Bernstein mentioned a National Bureau of Economic Research study--financed by the U.S. Department of Labor, the National Science Foundation and North Carolina State University, lest anyone question its authenticity--showing that the higher productivity of union building and construction tradesmen more than compensates for their reportedly higher wages and benefits.
OPINION
May 19, 2008
Last week's California Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage prompted an avalanche of mail, with roughly the same number of responses from each side. Given the intense reader interest in the topic, we are devoting today's page to it. Eryn Brown Letters Editor -- Re "Gay marriage ban overturned," May 16 As an attorney, I am surprised that it took so long for a court to reach the simple decision that if that state's constitution or the U.S. Constitution includes an equal-protection clause, then gay marriage must be legal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2010 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
County transportation officials have spent tens of millions of dollars on legal fees without adequate financial controls or oversight to evaluate and limit the costs, according to an audit released Wednesday. The review, by the inspector general of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, found that MTA attorneys had no written procedures for managing cases and routinely spent more than $200,000 for outside legal work without getting permission from the board of directors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1994 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to decide Wednesday on a controversial county contract that provides legal aid to hundreds of poor people each year, Orange County Central Court judges decided to meet again next week to consider giving other lawyers a chance to bid on the pact. In the meantime, Presiding Municipal Judge Gregory H. Lewis said the Santa Ana law firm of attorney William W. Stewart will remain the county's designated attorney to represent indigent clients in Central Court.
TRAVEL
November 18, 2001
James Gilden has given a rather one-sided opinion in his column "Refunds Now the Target of Customer Complaints" (Nov. 4). He neglects to consider that the airlines took an enormous hit after the Sept. 11 tragedy, so tremendous that the U.S. government saw fit to provide bailout funds to cover some of the losses. Would he prefer that the American taxpayer cover the costs of voluntary changes on the part of airline customers, who, however kindhearted their intentions, are not being forced to alter their plans for safety or other mandatory reasons?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1997
Re "Tequila Importer Agrees to Remove West Hollywood Statue," Jan. 10: Being kicked in the teeth by Mayor Paul Koretz of West Hollywood after agreeing to remove the Mexican art monument hardly served the agenda of local residents who want the art removed in a timely fashion. Koretz's public statement regarding financial responsibility for the monument's removal was careless and highly inflammatory. Despite an initial $400,000 corporate investment and a legal contract that clearly states West Hollywood's responsibility for the removal of the art, Heublein agreed to "partner" with the city to share in the cost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1994 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to decide Wednesday on a controversial county contract that provides legal aid to hundreds of poor people each year, Orange County Central Court judges decided to meet again next week to consider giving other lawyers a chance to bid on the pact. In the meantime, Presiding Municipal Judge Gregory H. Lewis said the Santa Ana law firm of attorney William W. Stewart will remain the county's designated attorney to represent indigent clients in Central Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1990
Quoting The Times ("Genetic Parents Win Sole Custody in Surrogate Case," Oct. 23): "The judge said a surrogate who is genetically unrelated to the child she carries does not acquire parental rights by virtue of having given birth to it." Is this what Judge Richard N. Parslow Jr. actually said, or is this a reporter's interpretation of the meaning of the decision? In either case, something is sadly missing here. I question whether anyone has the qualifications to make the judgment described in that quotation.
MAGAZINE
October 9, 1988
Since I have never been in the position of wanting to adopt a child, I do not feel qualified to judge or even offer an opinion on the legal services offered in Karen Stabiner's "The Baby Brokers." What troubles me is the search for the "perfect" family, be it adoption or surrogate parenting. What happens to the legal contract if the child turns out not to be perfect--physically handicapped or mentally handicapped--at birth? Are adoptive parents still as eager to make this child a part of their family?
BUSINESS
August 9, 1987
With interest and considerable pleasure, I read Harry Bernstein's June 30 column, "Unions Didn't Cause Loss of Building Jobs." It is not often that what organized labor does and seeks is appraised objectively, especially in this present period when business and anti-union individuals and organizations have uncorked a vituperative campaign to block passage in the Congress of so-called double-breasting legislation. I was particularly pleased to see that Bernstein mentioned a National Bureau of Economic Research study--financed by the U.S. Department of Labor, the National Science Foundation and North Carolina State University, lest anyone question its authenticity--showing that the higher productivity of union building and construction tradesmen more than compensates for their reportedly higher wages and benefits.
NEWS
July 21, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A $700,000 award against two newspapers that broke a promise of confidentiality to a political campaign worker has been overturned by the Minnesota Supreme Court. The court also held that enforcing a promise of confidentiality under a doctrine that implies a legal contract where none exists would violate the First Amendment rights of the Saint Paul Pioneer Press and the Star Tribune of Minneapolis.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1989 | From Times wire service s
A group of retired General Motors Corp. workers have sued the auto maker, saying GM reneged on health-care coverage promises. The group filed a class-action lawsuit Tuesday in federal court in Los Angeles on behalf of more than 80,000 salaried retirees, most of whom live in Michigan, Florida, California and Ohio.
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