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NEWS
July 22, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Hugh Rodham was cleared by the Florida Bar of violating rules of legal ethics in pocketing $400,000 from two convicted felons after successfully lobbying his brother-in-law, then-President Clinton, to pardon them, the Miami Herald reported. Rodham, 50, a Florida lawyer, requested pardons for convicted drug trafficker Carlos Vignali and businessman Glenn Braswell, and collected $200,000 from each of them after the pardons were granted.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- A month after suspending three lawmakers convicted of or facing criminal charges, the state Senate on Wednesday is devoting the day to reviewing ethics rules and introspection about what constitutes proper behavior for public officials. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) has canceled all regular committee meetings so that every senator and staff member can attend sessions to refresh their memories on ethics rules. The unprecedented action comes just weeks after the Senate voted to suspend Democratic state Sens.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1985 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
The attorney defending W. Patrick Moriarty on federal charges of public corruption withdrew from the case Friday on grounds that he can no longer represent the Orange County businessman because of a problem of legal ethics. Donald H. Heller, a Sacramento lawyer who has represented Moriarty since his Nov. 8 indictment on charges of racketeering and mail fraud in connection with the licensing of a poker club in the City of Commerce, refused to elaborate on his reasons for withdrawing.
OPINION
February 14, 2014
Re "When lawyers go bad," Opinion, Feb. 11 Yale law student Jane Chong needs to go back to class if she thinks that disgraced former journalist Stephen Glass should be granted a law license in California because current unethical members of the bar did equally bad or worse things. That's a losing argument in any court, whether legal or that of public opinion. Chong misses the salient reason for Glass' unacceptability. An attorney's ethics are challenged in nearly every case, whether in trying to set a criminal client free or in efforts to represent an alleged corporate wrongdoer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1995 | LISA G. LERMAN, Lisa G. Lerman is a visiting associate professor of law at American University
Former Associate Atty. Gen. Webster Hubbell is to be sentenced today. Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr charged that Hubbell stole "at least" $394,000 from his law firm and his clients by charging them for personal expenses and billing them for hours not worked. Hubbell, who once chaired the ethics committee of the Arkansas Bar Assn., admitted these allegations when he pleaded guilty in December to two felony charges.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Although the legal profession is full of people known for their rhetorical excesses, even lawyers face limits on what they can say. No lesser authority than the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that lawyers must watch their remarks in an attempt to assure fair and just trials. But in California--the only state that has not adopted American Bar Assn. rules on lawyers' comments--the line between fair comment and foul play is often murky. So it is no surprise that the latest comments from O.J.
OPINION
January 16, 1994 | Lincoln Caplan, Lincoln Caplan is the author of "Skadden: Power, Money and the Rise of a Legal Empire" (Farrar Straus & Giroux)
Americans hate lawyers because they charge too much, and earn way too much. Because they are ruthless adversaries and feckless allies. Because they engage in double talk, manipulate the judicial system for their own ends and leave people feeling abused. Because they hide behind noble-sounding ideas--"serving justice"--while playing a meaner game. Take lawyer jokes as a source of insight instead of laughs. Americans regard lawyers as base and disloyal (Q: Why don't snakes bite lawyers?
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | LAWRENCE L. KNUTSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A decade ago, Pope John Paul II told Father Robert F. Drinan that he must choose between the priesthood and serving in Congress. The collar that Drinan still wears speaks of his choice. In his office at Georgetown University Law Center, Drinan pulls out a thick volume of church law and reads aloud: "No priest or nun may hold any office. . . ." "They changed canon law after my case," he says. "Now, it's very clear. They legitimized their preference.
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
In a decision likely to fuel controversy in the federal judiciary, a federal appeals court Thursday unanimously overturned $6,200 in sanctions that a Los Angeles trial judge had imposed against two San Diego attorneys simply because they had not gone through the pro forma task of being admitted to practice in the U.S. District Court here--a task that takes about 10 minutes and costs $20. The appellate court in San Francisco said that U.S. District Judge Richard A. Gadbois Jr.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyer Ron Minkin, once the defender of men who shipped tons of marijuana into this country from such places as Thailand and Colombia, is a most unlikely volunteer in the war on drugs. For 15 years, Minkin smoked his clients' dope, shared their lavish meals, became godfather to their children. And as his core clientele of hippie dealers moved from small-time street deals on the Sunset Strip and became international drug barons, they paid him millions to keep them out of prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Doug Smith, Rosanna Xia and Michael Finnegan
Ending days of mixed messages, the city of Los Angeles sent a request Thursday formally asking a UC Berkeley engineering professor for a list of concrete buildings that could be at risk of collapsing in a major earthquake. The professor, Jack Moehle, responded quickly , saying that the university was "investigating the legal and ethical constraints" of releasing preliminary research data. He did not agree to release the list. Researchers led by Moehle have compiled a database of about 1,500 concrete structures in Los Angeles built before 1980 that may be at risk of collapse in an earthquake.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
  The Judicial Council of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals opened a misconduct review of Montana's chief federal District Court judge for forwarding a racially charged email about President Obama from his courthouse computer. Judge Richard F. Cebull asked for the review as calls mounted Thursday for his immediate resignation. Legal ethics experts predicted the incident would result in a public admonishment. The judge, appointed byPresident George W. Bush12 years ago, maintained after the email became public that it was meant to be seen as anti-Obama and not racist, but added, "I can obviously understand why people would be offended.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
The first military tribunal of a terrorism suspect at Guantanamo Bay since President Obama was elected is a lose-lose proposition for the accused, a Saudi suspect who has been in U.S. custody for nearly a decade. If convicted of directing the bombing of the U.S. destroyer Cole in October 2000, Abd al Rahim al Nashiri could be sentenced to death. But even if he is acquitted of all charges, he can be held indefinitely as an "enemy combatant. " The unusual proceeding, which opens Wednesday at the prison in Cuba, highlights a continuing legal and ethical dilemma for the Obama administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2011 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Gay and lesbian judges may preside over gay-rights cases and rule on same-sex marriage disputes as long as the jurists are not attempting to marry their partners, according to the nation's top experts in legal ethics. But ethicists disagree on whether retired federal judge Vaughn R. Walker, 67, should have disclosed his 10-year relationship with his partner before presiding over the challenge to Proposition 8, the 2008 California ballot measure that reinstated a ban on same-sex marriage.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
Virginia Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, may be stepping down as president of Liberty Central, a group she founded last year that worked with "tea party" activists to elect more conservatives to Congress. She has long been active in conservative politics in Washington, including serving as an aide to former House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R-Texas) and as a liaison between the Heritage Foundation and the George W. Bush administration. Thomas founded Liberty Central with the goal of restoring the "founding principles" of limited government and individual liberty.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey and David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
Virginia Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, is working to repeal what she believes is President Obama's "unconstitutional law" regulating health insurance, an issue likely to be decided by the high court. "With the U.S. Constitution on our side and the hearts and minds of the American people with us, freedom will prevail," says a position paper posted on the website of Liberty Central, the group formed by Virginia Thomas this year to advance conservative principles and candidates.
NEWS
February 20, 1995
Samuel D. Thurman, 81, a leading legal educator and author of a major textbook on legal ethics. The son of a member of the Utah Supreme Court, Thurman studied at the University of Utah and completed his law degree at Stanford University. After practicing law in Salt Lake City, he moved on to teaching at Stanford Law School, ultimately serving as acting dean. He returned to Salt Lake City as dean of the University of Utah College of Law from 1962 until his retirement in 1975.
OPINION
February 14, 2014
Re "When lawyers go bad," Opinion, Feb. 11 Yale law student Jane Chong needs to go back to class if she thinks that disgraced former journalist Stephen Glass should be granted a law license in California because current unethical members of the bar did equally bad or worse things. That's a losing argument in any court, whether legal or that of public opinion. Chong misses the salient reason for Glass' unacceptability. An attorney's ethics are challenged in nearly every case, whether in trying to set a criminal client free or in efforts to represent an alleged corporate wrongdoer.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2009 | Ashley Powers and Mark Z. Barabak
Nevada Sen. John Ensign's wealthy parents gave his mistress and her family $96,000, the conservative lawmaker revealed Thursday, an admission that further darkened his once-bright career and caused even allies to question his continued effectiveness as a U.S. senator. The gifts to Cynthia Hampton; her husband, Doug; and two of their children were made "out of concern for the well-being of longtime family friends during a difficult time," said a statement from Ensign's attorney.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2009 | William Heisel
The gig: Founder and chief executive of LRN, a Los Angeles firm with offices worldwide that helps companies manage their legal compliance, ethics education, environmental innovation and social responsibility. He also wrote the book "How: Why How We Do Anything Means Everything." Hard knocks: Seidman grew up dyslexic, shy and chubby. He also grew up rootless.
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