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Legal Malpractice

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two lawyers were indicted Thursday in an alleged immigration fraud scheme that arranged for Hungarian mothers to enter the United States illegally so they could give up their babies for adoption in exchange for money. A nine-count federal indictment named Janice J. Doezie, 49, of Villa Park, who operates a law office in Orange, and Heather E. Barnett, 38, a barrister with offices in Vancouver, British Columbia. Neither returned telephone calls seeking comment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1999
Two lawyers were indicted Thursday in an alleged immigration fraud scheme that arranged for Hungarian mothers to enter the United States illegally so they could give up their babies for adoption in exchange for money. A nine-count federal indictment named Janice J. Doezie, 49, of Villa Park, who operates a law office in Orange, and Heather E. Barnett, 38, a barrister with offices in Vancouver, British Columbia. Neither returned telephone calls seeking comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1999 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Louis "Skip" Miller, known as one of the most hard-nosed and aggressive attorneys in Los Angeles, is often hired to defend the city and its Police Department from accusations of wrongdoing. But did he engage in wrongdoing himself--possibly tampering with a jury--in a high-profile case involving missing photos of the Robert F. Kennedy assassination?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1999 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a horrific diving accident paralyzed Raul Lopez from the neck down, he turned to lawyer James Herman Davis, who negotiated a $1.2-million settlement for him. But over the years, as his body atrophied in a wheelchair, Lopez got only $25,000 of that money and died while living in an unheated garage, because, authorities allege, he couldn't afford medical treatment or another place to live.
NEWS
April 14, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The epiphany of Charles R.B. Kirk came 26 years ago. He had been a prosecutor for seven years, toiling in the San Francisco division of the state attorney general's office, and he was agonizing about his career choice. As he headed across the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge toward Marin County, he felt overcome with the failure he saw everywhere: the broken homes, broken lives and broken bodies. He was deep into his gloomy reverie when he saw San Quentin prison, home of California's death row.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1998
A Los Angeles Superior Court Commissioner upheld a $1.9-million default judgment Thursday against former civil rights attorney A. Thomas Hunt for failing to appear in court for his client. Hunt asked Commissioner Emilie H. Elias to dismiss the judgment won against him by Howard Bennett in 1995, saying that he was never properly served with the summons and complaint and that he only learned of the suit in early 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1997 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Superior Court jury has awarded an Acton couple $8.1 million in a legal malpractice case, agreeing with the plaintiffs that the young lawyers they hired after their 5-year-old son was killed in a horseback riding accident had botched a wrongful-death suit. The three defendants, two of whom were recent law school graduates when retained eight years ago, plan to appeal the verdict, considered unusual because most legal malpractice cases are settled out of court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1997
A Superior Court jury has awarded an Acton couple $8.1 million in a legal malpractice case, agreeing with the plaintiffs that young lawyers they hired after their 5-year-old son was killed in a horseback riding accident botched a wrongful-death suit. The three defendants, two of whom were recent law school graduates when retained eight years ago, plan to appeal the verdict, considered unusual because most legal malpractice cases are settled out of court.
NEWS
May 22, 1997 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A suspect in the slaying of a Redondo Beach man used information allegedly provided by his defense team to solicit the murder of key witnesses who could send him to death row, prosecutors have charged. Using a code of secret symbols, defendant Spencer Rawlin Brasure sent letters to friends asking that witnesses be "taken care of" before his preliminary hearing next month, prosecutors alleged in court documents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1996 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former civil rights attorney A. Thomas Hunt, cleared in April of criminal charges that he cheated clients, was cleared again Tuesday by a different judge of a new set of felony counts. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael Cowell dismissed an indictment that alleged seven counts of grand theft. Cowell said Hunt, 56, may have violated business and professional codes but did not commit a felony when he accepted fees from clients but failed to follow through on their cases.
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