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Legal Malpractice

NEWS
April 14, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The epiphany of Charles R.B. Kirk came 26 years ago. He had been a prosecutor for seven years, toiling in the San Francisco division of the state attorney general's office, and he was agonizing about his career choice. As he headed across the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge toward Marin County, he felt overcome with the failure he saw everywhere: the broken homes, broken lives and broken bodies. He was deep into his gloomy reverie when he saw San Quentin prison, home of California's death row.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1998
A Los Angeles Superior Court Commissioner upheld a $1.9-million default judgment Thursday against former civil rights attorney A. Thomas Hunt for failing to appear in court for his client. Hunt asked Commissioner Emilie H. Elias to dismiss the judgment won against him by Howard Bennett in 1995, saying that he was never properly served with the summons and complaint and that he only learned of the suit in early 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1997 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Superior Court jury has awarded an Acton couple $8.1 million in a legal malpractice case, agreeing with the plaintiffs that the young lawyers they hired after their 5-year-old son was killed in a horseback riding accident had botched a wrongful-death suit. The three defendants, two of whom were recent law school graduates when retained eight years ago, plan to appeal the verdict, considered unusual because most legal malpractice cases are settled out of court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1997
A Superior Court jury has awarded an Acton couple $8.1 million in a legal malpractice case, agreeing with the plaintiffs that young lawyers they hired after their 5-year-old son was killed in a horseback riding accident botched a wrongful-death suit. The three defendants, two of whom were recent law school graduates when retained eight years ago, plan to appeal the verdict, considered unusual because most legal malpractice cases are settled out of court.
NEWS
May 22, 1997 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A suspect in the slaying of a Redondo Beach man used information allegedly provided by his defense team to solicit the murder of key witnesses who could send him to death row, prosecutors have charged. Using a code of secret symbols, defendant Spencer Rawlin Brasure sent letters to friends asking that witnesses be "taken care of" before his preliminary hearing next month, prosecutors alleged in court documents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1996 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former civil rights attorney A. Thomas Hunt, cleared in April of criminal charges that he cheated clients, was cleared again Tuesday by a different judge of a new set of felony counts. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael Cowell dismissed an indictment that alleged seven counts of grand theft. Cowell said Hunt, 56, may have violated business and professional codes but did not commit a felony when he accepted fees from clients but failed to follow through on their cases.
NEWS
October 26, 1996 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The judge overseeing the probation of Death Row Records owner Marion "Suge" Knight on Friday ordered the California attorney general's office to appear in court Monday and explain why it should not take over the case from the district attorney's office. The State Bar, meanwhile, launched a separate probe of Deputy Dist. Atty. Lawrence M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1996
Rodney G. King has sued his former attorney for malpractice, contending that lawyer Steven Lerman misappropriated money won in a civil suit against the city of Los Angeles stemming from King's 1991 beating by police. In the suit, filed in Superior Court on Friday, King alleges that Lerman has failed to comply with repeated requests to fully account for money awarded to King. In April 1994, a jury awarded King $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
When the bright, unforgiving glare of the media fell on attorney Leslie Abramson, she received a painful lesson about the difference between the law and L.A. law. Regular law is what she used to practice, before the Menendez trial made her famous, before "Nightline" and her book contract. Now, Abramson is caught up in L.A. law, where celebrity is more important than the statutes and stardom descends on a few, magnifying their successes and failures all out of proportion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1996 | TONY PERRY and ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The defendants are pillars of the local legal establishment, with long ties to the community and lots of friends in high places. Their accusers, for the most part, are outsiders, newly arrived from out of town and still eyed with some suspicion by the clubby San Diegans. For 18 months, while federal prosecutors and FBI agents probed the illicit links between three former San Diego judges and a prominent trial attorney, there had been sub rosa grumbling among other judges and lawyers.
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