Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLegal Services Corp
IN THE NEWS

Legal Services Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 22, 1988 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
Stirring an immediate furor in Congress, the Legal Services Corp. disclosed Thursday that it had hired three high-powered law firms to lobby for the 18% cut proposed by President Reagan in the corporation's fiscal 1989 budget. Sen. Warren B. Rudman (R-N.H.), member of a key Senate Appropriations subcommittee, blasted the move--apparently unprecedented--as "bizarre" and "not an appropriate use of taxpayers' money." Rep. Robert W. Kastenmeier (D-Wis.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 24, 2010
Liberal groups and the American Bar Assn. are opposing President Obama's nomination of Sharon Browne, an attorney at the Sacramento-based Pacific Legal Foundation, to the board of the Legal Services Corp., which oversees legal aid for the poor. So far, however, the critics haven't made a persuasive case. No more than six members of the corporation's 11-person board can come from the same party, and Browne was recommended for a minority seat by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1996
On behalf of the thousands of indigent, elderly and disabled clients who seek legal representation from Bet Tzedek Legal Services, thank you for your editorial in support of continued funding for the Legal Services Corp. ("Stop Slashing Legal Aid to Poor," July 22). During last year's rush to cut the heart out of social services funding, the Legal Services Corp. budget was mindlessly slashed. At Bet Tzedek that meant the entire elimination of our grant. Because we were not as heavily dependent on that program as many other vital agencies are, we have not had to cut our services or our staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2001
When it radically restructured federal welfare rules in 1996, Congress required most recipients to find gainful employment. Job programs would train welfare clients for the work force, teaching them job skills that would allow them to build new lives. That's if they speak English. In Los Angeles County, as elsewhere, job-training options are extremely limited for non-English speakers. Yet until the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1995 | STEVEN A. NISSEN, Steven A. Nissen is executive director of Public Counsel and a member of the State Bar of California's Access to Justice Working Group
Across this country, Americans have devoted countless hours to debating our justice system in light of the O.J. Simpson verdict. Does the system work? Do you need a "dream team"? Are lawyers available only to the highest bidder? Unfortunately, many of these questions are being debated only in the context of the Simpson trial and verdict.
OPINION
February 24, 2010
Liberal groups and the American Bar Assn. are opposing President Obama's nomination of Sharon Browne, an attorney at the Sacramento-based Pacific Legal Foundation, to the board of the Legal Services Corp., which oversees legal aid for the poor. So far, however, the critics haven't made a persuasive case. No more than six members of the corporation's 11-person board can come from the same party, and Browne was recommended for a minority seat by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.
NEWS
June 30, 1985 | Associated Press
The federal Legal Services Corp. has named James H. Wentzel, a Federal Trade Commission official, as its new president.
NEWS
January 9, 1985
Donald Bogard, described as a "lightning rod for criticism" during his two-year tenure as president of the beleaguered Legal Services Corp., is resigning, a spokesman for the organization said in Washington. Bogard, accused of sharing President Reagan's desire to abolish the agency, will leave his $69,000-a-year job Jan. 31. The Legal Services Corp., created by Congress in 1974, distributes money to 320 programs nationwide that provide legal help to poor people in non-criminal matters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1996
In the debates now rocking Congress over which programs to trim in the coming fiscal year, the Legal Services Corp. has emerged as a favorite target. Earlier this month the House Appropriations Committee voted to cut by half the allocation to the organization, which funds and trains regional agencies offering legal assistance to people who cannot afford basic and essential legal services such as representation in wrongful evictions from one's home or in the face of domestic violence threats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1995
I was astounded to read Gary Bauer's ideological attack on the Legal Services Corp. (Commentary, Nov. 29). In California Rural Legal Assistance's Santa Maria office (1984-88), my caseload consisted of farm workers living in unspeakable conditions trying to get paid for their work, senior citizens ripped off by scam artists, disabled people trying to understand the SSI system and many other individuals with a variety of legal problems. The only thing they had in common was being too poor to hire a lawyer.
NEWS
March 1, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a victory for poor people, a sharply divided Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that federally funded legal services cannot be barred from challenging welfare laws on behalf of their indigent clients. Citing the 1st Amendment, the high court on a 5-4 vote overturned a restriction imposed by Congress in 1996 that barred Legal Services Corp. lawyers from suing the government over the effects of welfare laws, including massive reforms sponsored by President Clinton. Justice Anthony M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2000 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She has never been more successful, but for the first time in her life, poverty law attorney Barbara Macri-Ortiz will soon be out of work. It doesn't matter that she has scored a string of victories during her 13-year legal career, the most recent of which will result in the creation of more than 150 units of affordable housing in Oxnard.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday said that it would decide whether federally funded lawyers for the poor have a free-speech right to challenge the government's new restrictions on welfare. The case, to be heard in the fall, renews a long-running fight between advocates for the poor and congressional conservatives.
OPINION
August 10, 1997
While reading "Budget's Impact Will Be Modest for Most" (July 30), I noticed a quote by Washington consultant Peter J. Davis. He joked that Congress "may have to bring back the old Legal Services Corp. just to explain this stuff." Mr. Davis, Congress won't have to bring back LSC because it never went anywhere; it is very much alive after 23 years. The Legal Services Corp. funds 275 local legal aid programs around the country to ensure equal access to justice under the law for all Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1996
On behalf of the thousands of indigent, elderly and disabled clients who seek legal representation from Bet Tzedek Legal Services, thank you for your editorial in support of continued funding for the Legal Services Corp. ("Stop Slashing Legal Aid to Poor," July 22). During last year's rush to cut the heart out of social services funding, the Legal Services Corp. budget was mindlessly slashed. At Bet Tzedek that meant the entire elimination of our grant. Because we were not as heavily dependent on that program as many other vital agencies are, we have not had to cut our services or our staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1996
In the debates now rocking Congress over which programs to trim in the coming fiscal year, the Legal Services Corp. has emerged as a favorite target. Earlier this month the House Appropriations Committee voted to cut by half the allocation to the organization, which funds and trains regional agencies offering legal assistance to people who cannot afford basic and essential legal services such as representation in wrongful evictions from one's home or in the face of domestic violence threats.
NEWS
January 8, 1985 | Associated Press
Donald Bogard, the controversial president of the beleaguered Legal Services Corp., is resigning from his post, spokesman James Streeter confirmed today. Bogard's resignation will take effect Jan. 31 but he will serve for an apparently undetermined period as a consultant to the federally funded organization that provides legal help to the poor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1996
Those in Congress who are so anxious to slash federally funded legal services say they want to end what they consider nuisance lawsuits by welfare recipients and others getting government handouts. But make no mistake: These massive cuts will hit the working poor hard. And they will render increasingly hollow the constitutional guarantee of all Americans to equal treatment under the law.
NEWS
December 30, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Back in the early days of the War on Poverty, Sargent Shriver called up John Sutro, president of the California Bar Assn. Sutro--who later became a supporter of legal aid to the poor--was objecting to the tactics of the fledgling California Rural Legal Assistance. "Mr. Sutro said to me that these [CRLA] lawyers might be useful to and used by the poor in suits against the growers," Shriver, President Lyndon B.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|