Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLegal Status
IN THE NEWS

Legal Status

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Brian Bennett
­The Obama administration is proposing to make it easier for illegal immigrants who are family members of American citizens to apply for legal permanent residency. On Monday, the Department of Homeland Security will post for public comment an administrative change intended to reduce the time illegal immigrants would have to spend away from their families while applying for legal status, officials said. The current system requires the applicant to first leave the U.S. to seek a legal visa, but under the proposed change illegal immigrants could claim the time apart from a spouse, child or parent would create “extreme hardship” and allow them to remain in the U.S. as they begin the process.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Healthcare advocates Tuesday urged the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to set aside at least $11 million in additional funding for free medical services for low-income residents - including immigrants lacking legal status - who remain uninsured under Obamacare. Members of the faith-based coalition One L.A., labor groups and community healthcare organizations told reporters and board members that failing to expand a county program to serve thousands more poor and undocumented residents would endanger public health.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
State Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) introduced legislation Friday that would allow immigrants without legal status to receive or buy health insurance through the state. Such immigrants are the single-largest group of people who remain uninsured under the Affordable Care Act. The national law explicitly bars immigrants without legal status from receiving any kind of federal money, which means that in California, they can't buy insurance through the Covered California exchange, or qualify for the state's low-income health plan, Medi-Cal.  "Healthcare for everyone should mean everyone," Lara said at a news conference Friday in Los Angeles.
OPINION
March 7, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Luciano Sandoval, a 41-year-old farmworker living in the United States without legal status, went to the Kern County Courthouse in Bakersfield last month to pay a traffic ticket. A few days later, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents detained him as he was going to work and began deportation proceedings. Sandoval, who has six American-born daughters, said the agents told him he was targeted after paying a fine for driving without a license - a red flag for possible undocumented status.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Paul West
WASHINGTON - Nearly three in four Americans say that illegal immigrants should be allowed to remain in the country legally, but fewer than half say they should be allowed to apply for citizenship. Those are the key findings of a new national poll, released Thursday, that reflects a positive shift in attitudes toward immigrants now in the United States. The survey, conducted March 13-17 by the Pew Research Center, comes as lawmakers in Washington are attempting to craft a comprehensive plan to deal with some 11 million people who are thought to be in the country illegally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
Jiovanna Campbell was 9 when her uncle killed himself. Beyond her parents, he was the only family she had known since coming illegally to the U.S. at age 3. Her parents sold everything they owned to take his body back to Mexico, she recalled. They stayed for a few months while her parents coped with the death. Then they returned to the Bay Area, crossing the border illegally with others in a car. Campbell finished high school, enrolled in college, married a U.S. citizen and bought a home.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Influential House Republicans, adopting a distinctly more conciliatory approach to immigration reform since the November election, are seriously considering ways to give legal status to illegal immigrants. The push by President Obama and a high-profile group of senators to create a pathway to citizenship has met stiff resistance from conservatives in the GOP-led House. And their intense opposition could undermine efforts to find a compromise that can pass the House. But party leaders have encouraged a secretive bipartisan group to work on a deal and have spoken openly about their support for reform.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Eight senators who have spent weeks trying to write a bipartisan bill to overhaul immigration laws have privately agreed on the most contentious part of the draft - how to offer legal status to the nation's 11 million illegal immigrants. According to aides familiar with the closed-door negotiations, the bill would require illegal immigrants to register with Homeland Security Department authorities, file federal income taxes for their time in America and pay a still-to-be-determined fine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
When Alva Alvarez gets sick, she buys over-the-counter medicine from the grocery and takes as much as she can until she feels better. The mother of five resorts to this because she can't afford a visit to the doctor to figure out what's ailing her. Although scenarios like this are supposed to disappear as millions of Americans become newly insured under the national healthcare law, Alvarez's situation isn't likely to improve and could get worse....
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A law recognizing the legal validity of marriages contracted in church, passed earlier this year, took effect in Poland, PAP news agency said. The law, passed on the basis of a Concordat Treaty between Poland and the Vatican, gave marriages performed by clergymen binding legal status identical to that of civil ceremonies conducted at state registry offices. According to laws initially enacted by the now-defunct, officially atheist Communist regime, only civil marriages were recognized as legal.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
A new report shows that as many as 125,000 young California immigrants may qualify for an expansion of Medi-Cal, the state's Medicaid program. The Affordable Care Act bars insurance subsidies and enrollment in the Medicaid expansion for undocumented immigrants, but a wrinkle in California rules does offer coverage for those with "deferred action status. " The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was created by President Obama in 2012 to grant immigrants who came to the country illegally as children -- sometimes called Dreamers -- legal status and work authorization for two-year periods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
State Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) introduced legislation Friday that would allow immigrants without legal status to receive or buy health insurance through the state. Such immigrants are the single-largest group of people who remain uninsured under the Affordable Care Act. The national law explicitly bars immigrants without legal status from receiving any kind of federal money, which means that in California, they can't buy insurance through the Covered California exchange, or qualify for the state's low-income health plan, Medi-Cal.  "Healthcare for everyone should mean everyone," Lara said at a news conference Friday in Los Angeles.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2014 | By Brian Bennett and Michael A. Memoli
CAMBRIDGE, Md. - A Republican blueprint for immigration reform offers legalization for some of the nation's 11 million people who are in the country illegally, but no special pathway to citizenship except in the cases of children brought here by their parents, according to a draft presented Thursday to lawmakers by party leadership. The much-anticipated blueprint, while short on specifics, would offer legal status to immigrants as long as they admitted to wrongdoing, paid fines and taxes, submitted to a criminal background check and demonstrated a mastery of English and civics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
When Alva Alvarez gets sick, she buys over-the-counter medicine from the grocery and takes as much as she can until she feels better. The mother of five resorts to this because she can't afford a visit to the doctor to figure out what's ailing her. Although scenarios like this are supposed to disappear as millions of Americans become newly insured under the national healthcare law, Alvarez's situation isn't likely to improve and could get worse....
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Ever heard of David Valadao?  Exactly.  The soft-spoken freshman congressman may be little known outside his district in California's Central Valley, even to many of his House Republican colleagues. But he is emerging as a leading voice in urging GOP leadership to schedule a vote this year on an overhaul of immigration legislation. It's no surprise that Valadao joined Democrats this week on a bill that would provide a path to citizenship to millions of immigrants in the country illegally.  After all, he represents a district that is 71% Latino and relies on immigrants to pick crops.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- As a comprehensive immigration overhaul stalls in the House, two border-state lawmakers introduced legislation Thursday that would tackle one aspect of the issue -- making it easier to unite American families split apart by past immigration law violations. The effort from Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-Texas) and Rep. Steve Pearce (R-N.M.) could provide common ground among Democrats and Republicans, an opportunity to ease into a debate over what to do with one subset of the estimated 11 million people living in the United States without legal status.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2009 | Anna Gorman
The federal government's E-Verify program, which seeks to reduce the hiring of illegal immigrants, is becoming increasingly popular, with 1,000 new businesses signing up each week despite concerns about its reliability. More than 124,000 businesses, including nearly 10,000 in California, are signed up for the Web-based identification program that enables employers to check whether an employee is authorized to work, according to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
A proposed plan to verify the citizenship status of those receiving public funds has been put on hold until the state releases new guidelines. Residents said they are concerned that illegal immigrants may be seeking federal grants, no-interest loans and other financial aid. They want a city policy that would require recipients to first show proof of citizenship or legal residency. There is no evidence that illegal immigrants have received financial aid administered by the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Cindy Chang
On issues such as raising wages for hotel employees, business and labor are often on opposite sides. But on Monday, Gary Toebben of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce and Maria Elena Durazo of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, joined forces to demand a path to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants in the country without legal status. The news conference on the steps of the Chamber's Los Angeles office came as prospects for immigration reform are looking increasingly dim. As lawmakers return from the August recess to focus on the federal budget and a response against Syria, immigration may be pushed back until next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2013 | By Cindy Chang
Taped to the walls of their high school cafeteria are the stories of how they got here: "I came … to the U.S. by car," one girl wrote in orange marker. "A guy made the officers believe that I was his daughter. " In pink marker, another described a father who had come to Los Angeles in 1992, working until he saved enough money for his wife and child to follow. In a six-week summer program, these students are discussing topics that rarely come up during the school year. Led by instructors who grew up without legal status themselves, the youngsters are studying immigrant rights and learning ways to improve their neighborhoods, their schools and their country.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|