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Legal Status

NEWS
August 25, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Friday that his plan to help Mexican and other illegal immigrant workers acquire legal status will not shortchange those "who have been waiting in line legally." The president gave that assurance as he also flatly dismissed--with considerable ardor--any suggestion that his immigration reform package is driven by a desire to woo the growing Latino voting population, whose support is key to his political fortunes.
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NATIONAL
December 21, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas and Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
President Obama and Latino lawmakers agreed Tuesday that chances are dimming for passage of an immigration overhaul that would provide a path to legal status for millions of illegal residents, according to people familiar with the private session. Instead, the president and members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus concurred that, until after the 2012 election, a more realistic goal would be to stave off legislation targeting illegal immigrants. That said, Obama told the group, he was not giving up on an immigration overhaul, which he promised to accomplish during his 2008 presidential campaign.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
Deportations of illegal immigrants have reached new heights for two years running under President Obama, statistics show, but Republicans say they'll use their new majority in the House to press for more aggressive enforcement without any path to legal status. Republican lawmakers called on the Obama administration to return to the era of workplace raids to arrest illegal employees, an approach that contrasts sharply with the president's continued push to create a path to citizenship for "responsible young people" and deport only those illegal immigrants charged with serious crimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2013 | By Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
In 1986, lawmakers decided the problem of illegal immigration had to be dealt with. More than 3 million people were living in the United States after crossing the border illegally or overstaying their visas. A new law signed by President Ronald Reagan gave legal status and a path to citizenship to most of those unauthorized residents - helping many secure a slice of the American dream but also giving fuel to critics who sought to turn "amnesty" into a pejorative. Less than 30 years later, the number of immigrants living in the country illegally is thought to have nearly quadrupled, and the freighted baggage of amnesty looms over new efforts to reform the nation's immigration laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2009 | By Teresa Watanabe
On the plaza of Dolores Mission Church, long a sanctuary for illegal immigrants, a Roman Catholic priest asked the question that has hovered in the minds of so many of the city's migrants since Charlie Beck was appointed Los Angeles police chief. Flanked by parishioners holding flickering votive candles in the cool evening air, Father Scott Santarosa asked Beck whether he could assure community members that they will not be asked about their immigration status if they report a crime. " Sí," Beck said, drawing laughs and applause from the crowd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2010 | Hector Tobar
Just about any way they look at it, Meg Whitman comes off badly to the moms I met at the Brentwood Country Mart. Most of them are lifelong professionals like Whitman, with kids grown up and in college. And, like her, they've lived many years with Spanish-speaking immigrant women working in their homes. They don't quite believe Whitman when she says she didn't know that her longtime domestic, Nicandra Diaz Santillan, was an undocumented immigrant. And if the billionaire and GOP candidate for governor is being honest ?
NATIONAL
June 28, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian and Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Early one morning in March, two Chicago-area brothers were dozing on an Amtrak train when it stopped in Buffalo, N.Y. A pair of uniformed Border Patrol agents made their way through the car, asking passengers if they were U.S. citizens. No, the vacationing siblings answered honestly, with flat, Midwestern inflections: We're citizens of Mexico. And so it was that college students Carlos Robles, 20, and his brother Rafael, 19 — both former captains of their high school varsity tennis team — found themselves in jail, facing deportation.
OPINION
December 16, 2012 | By Peter Skerry
The debate over U.S. immigration policy has been rebooted. There now appears to be bipartisan support for what's generally called comprehensive reform. But a stumbling block remains: What to do about the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants among us. Deportation? Complete amnesty? A "path" to citizenship? There is a way forward, and it can be best summarized by "none of the above. " It lies, instead, between these choices. It's legalization without citizenship . With as few conditions and as broadly as possible, we should offer undocumented immigrants status as "permanent noncitizen residents.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is proposing to make it easier for illegal immigrants who are immediate family members of American citizens to apply for permanent residency, a move that could affect as many as 1 million of the estimated 11 million immigrants living here illegally. The new rule, which the Department of Homeland Security will post for public comment Monday, would reduce the time illegal immigrants are separated from their American families while seeking legal status, immigration officials said.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
A new report shows that as many as 125,000 young California immigrants may qualify for an expansion of Medi-Cal, the state's Medicaid program. The Affordable Care Act bars insurance subsidies and enrollment in the Medicaid expansion for undocumented immigrants, but a wrinkle in California rules does offer coverage for those with "deferred action status. " The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was created by President Obama in 2012 to grant immigrants who came to the country illegally as children -- sometimes called Dreamers -- legal status and work authorization for two-year periods.
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