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January 26, 2003 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
His departure was supposed to quell the storm. But more than a month after Cardinal Bernard Law abruptly resigned as archbishop of Boston, discontent lingers in this troubled Roman Catholic community. Clerical abuse survivors are outraged over the church's tough new legal strategy of probing victims' psychotherapy records. Lay reform leaders complain that Law's successor has not returned their phone calls. Some priests say they are shellshocked.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2002 | Mai Tran, Times Staff Writer
A 42-year-old Baldwin Park man who was arrested last year on suspicion of trying to bomb the Vietnamese Embassy in Thailand has decided to fight extradition rather than risk being returned to his homeland, his attorney said Thursday. Van Duc Vo, who appeared in federal court in Santa Ana on Thursday as hundreds of supporters rallied outside the courthouse, had earlier agreed to be extradited to Thailand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2002 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although actor Robert Blake has yet to be formally charged in court with murdering his wife, Bonny Lee Bakley, the battle lines in the case are clearly in view. For Blake's defense lawyer, Harland W. Braun, the task is clear: Persuade potential jurors that Bakley was such a sleazy individual that hundreds of people had a motive to kill her, and consequently take the focus off his client. For prosecutors Patrick R. Dixon and Gregory A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2001 | JEAN GUCCIONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Marco Barrera was charged with beating to death his two young children, a lawyer for the Mexican government made a personal appeal to prosecutors to forgo the death penalty. When that didn't work, Mexican officials tried to save Barrera's life another way: They assisted his lawyer in preparing a defense. In a growing number of criminal cases, foreign consulates are playing a supporting role in defending their citizens, particularly those facing death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court in San Francisco on Wednesday set aside a nearly 3 1/2-year prison sentence for a man who sent a threatening letter to former President Bill Clinton. A district judge failed to adequately consider the defendant's plea for a lighter sentence on grounds that he had an extraordinary history of childhood abuse and suffered from diminished mental capacity, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled. The appeals court sent the case back to U.S.
NEWS
June 20, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Justice Department lawyers, faced with dimming prospects for their massive suit against cigarette makers, have decided to seek a settlement that would eliminate a major legal threat to the embattled industry, officials disclosed Tuesday. But tobacco industry executives said they aren't interested in settling what they consider a meritless case. And anti-tobacco activists weren't happy about the Justice Department's new strategy either, accusing Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2001 | TWILA DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The body of actor Robert Blake's wife had hardly been whisked from the crime scene last week when defense attorney Harland Braun, an affable lawyer with a mischievous grin, stepped before the cameras and began picking apart the victim's character.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Randall Richman swears he didn't drink the night he was arrested for drunk driving. He admits that he did eat fire. The breath test that measured his blood alcohol at twice the legal limit wasn't detecting liquor, according to the 32-year-old magician from Westlake Village. It was reading three different lighter fluids. "I use the stuff that says on the bottle, 'If you drink this, you're going to die,' " Richman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2001 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months after her conviction in the beating death of her 2-year-old daughter was overturned, Gabriela Hernandez is preparing for a new trial and a new defense. Unlike the first trial, Hernandez's attorneys will argue that she was a battered woman so paralyzed by fear that she could not stop her husband Rogelio from killing their daughter, Joselin. Hernandez's second trial will be closely watched.
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