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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court in San Francisco on Wednesday set aside a nearly 3 1/2-year prison sentence for a man who sent a threatening letter to former President Bill Clinton. A district judge failed to adequately consider the defendant's plea for a lighter sentence on grounds that he had an extraordinary history of childhood abuse and suffered from diminished mental capacity, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled. The appeals court sent the case back to U.S.
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NEWS
June 20, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Justice Department lawyers, faced with dimming prospects for their massive suit against cigarette makers, have decided to seek a settlement that would eliminate a major legal threat to the embattled industry, officials disclosed Tuesday. But tobacco industry executives said they aren't interested in settling what they consider a meritless case. And anti-tobacco activists weren't happy about the Justice Department's new strategy either, accusing Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2001 | TWILA DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The body of actor Robert Blake's wife had hardly been whisked from the crime scene last week when defense attorney Harland Braun, an affable lawyer with a mischievous grin, stepped before the cameras and began picking apart the victim's character.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Randall Richman swears he didn't drink the night he was arrested for drunk driving. He admits that he did eat fire. The breath test that measured his blood alcohol at twice the legal limit wasn't detecting liquor, according to the 32-year-old magician from Westlake Village. It was reading three different lighter fluids. "I use the stuff that says on the bottle, 'If you drink this, you're going to die,' " Richman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2001 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months after her conviction in the beating death of her 2-year-old daughter was overturned, Gabriela Hernandez is preparing for a new trial and a new defense. Unlike the first trial, Hernandez's attorneys will argue that she was a battered woman so paralyzed by fear that she could not stop her husband Rogelio from killing their daughter, Joselin. Hernandez's second trial will be closely watched.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In his last-ditch appeal to the Florida Supreme Court today, Al Gore will argue that the only way to prove he is the actual winner in the state is to count the roughly 14,000 disputed ballots from Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties, sources close to the vice president say. In his stinging ruling Monday, Leon County Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls said Gore had failed to demonstrate "a reasonable probability" that, even if further hand counts were ordered, the election result would be reversed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana City Councilman Ted R. Moreno will fight political corruption charges by alleging he was entrapped by the FBI, his attorney disclosed for the first time Wednesday. For two years, Moreno has strongly denied allegations that he extorted thousands of dollars from business owners with issues pending before the City Council. But according to interviews and court papers, Moreno plans to center his legal defense on whether the FBI crossed the line in its two-year corruption probe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved a legal finding that new cities in the San Fernando Valley or Harbor areas might have to make payments to Los Angeles as the price of secession. The 10-4 vote gave the city attorney's office permission to submit the opinion to the county agency that is setting the rules for a potential breakup of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal Judge Richard A. Paez took under advisement Monday a government motion to compel lawyers for Buford O. Furrow Jr. to declare by June 26 whether they will mount a mental health defense. Lawyers for the avowed white supremacist said they should not be required to reveal their intentions until Aug. 15 at the earliest, and only after Paez decides key defense motions, including one challenging the death penalty case against Furrow.
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