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NEWS
January 31, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House reacted angrily Saturday night to a report that independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr is considering whether to indict President Clinton before the president leaves office, charging that Starr, in disclosing his plans, is interfering with the ongoing Senate impeachment trial. "Besides reinforcing his own stereotype, Kenneth Starr is tampering with the Senate trial," said Jim Kennedy, a spokesman for the White House counsel's office.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1999 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven-year-old Inderjit Dosanjh flew out of Disneyland's Teacup ride, fractured a vertebra and ended up in a body cast for four months. Though a jury decided the theme park was not at fault, an angry Orange County Superior Court judge in 1997 called the verdict a "miscarriage of justice." He accused Disney's attorneys of hiding a key witness and improperly influencing the jury and granted the boy a new trial.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House Republicans who brought the impeachment charges against President Clinton have continually faulted the White House lawyers for ignoring the facts of the case. This week, they got what they asked for. In three days of arguments, the president's lawyers focused on the facts, and slowly and methodically picked apart the case constructed by the prosecutors.
NEWS
January 17, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House prosecutors, in opening arguments that at times were highly effective, appeared to make a strong, if circumstantial, case that President Clinton conspired to hide evidence in the Paula Corbin Jones case. They also showed that the crimes of perjury and obstruction of justice, if proved, could justify removing him from office. "It's a hard question," Rep. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dr. Warren Hern walks into a restaurant, he heads for a seat with its back to the wall. He installed bulletproof glass on his office windows and $1,400 worth of blinds at home. He varies his route to work. At public meetings, he wears a bulletproof vest. "I felt like a hunted animal . . . like I could be shot at any time," the Boulder, Colo., physician said of his life after being listed on a "wanted poster" and an Internet site launched by anti-abortion groups.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
The text, as transcribed by the Federal Document Clearing House, of White House attorney Gregory B. Craig's defense statement Tuesday to the House Judiciary Committee, capsulizing the president's case for averting impeachment: Mr. Chairman, Congressman Conyers, members of the committee, good morning. My name is Greg Craig. And I am special counsel to the president. Let me first say that it is my honor--as well as an obligation--to appear before this committee in defense of the president.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The White House on Tuesday released its most comprehensive challenge to the central elements of the articles of impeachment that the House Judiciary Committee will consider this week. In the 184-page document, President Clinton's White House lawyers, his private attorney and his special counsel for impeachment matters assembled and expanded on legal points that they have raised since independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr issued his report on the Monica S. Lewinsky scandal in September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1998 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would be "ridiculous" to suggest that a devout Jehovah's Witness died solely because she declined a blood transfusion and not because of injuries sustained when she was run over by an alleged drunk driver, a medical expert testified Friday in the vehicular murder trial of Keith Cook. The testimony of Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1998 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fascinating convergence of religion and the law brought the media in force to a Pomona courtroom Thursday, where a jury must decide if a suspected drunk driver killed Jadine Russell, or her refusal of a blood transfusion did. As the vehicular murder trial of Keith Cook entered its second day, his attorney tried to show that Cook was not as drunk nor driving as fast as the prosecution suggests; and thus was not murderous when his truck plowed into Russell's car March 7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1998 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crimes against the two young girls have never been disputed: Both were repeatedly raped while wards of Los Angeles County by the son of their foster mother, beginning when they were only 11. County social workers failed to protect them over a three-year period. One of the girls was impregnated by their "foster brother" three times and had two abortions--one at the request of her foster mother. Ultimately, at age 14, she bore her assailant, Anthony Colbert, a son.
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