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Legal Strategy

NEWS
June 20, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Justice Department lawyers, faced with dimming prospects for their massive suit against cigarette makers, have decided to seek a settlement that would eliminate a major legal threat to the embattled industry, officials disclosed Tuesday. But tobacco industry executives said they aren't interested in settling what they consider a meritless case. And anti-tobacco activists weren't happy about the Justice Department's new strategy either, accusing Atty. Gen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2001 | TWILA DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The body of actor Robert Blake's wife had hardly been whisked from the crime scene last week when defense attorney Harland Braun, an affable lawyer with a mischievous grin, stepped before the cameras and began picking apart the victim's character.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Randall Richman swears he didn't drink the night he was arrested for drunk driving. He admits that he did eat fire. The breath test that measured his blood alcohol at twice the legal limit wasn't detecting liquor, according to the 32-year-old magician from Westlake Village. It was reading three different lighter fluids. "I use the stuff that says on the bottle, 'If you drink this, you're going to die,' " Richman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2001 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months after her conviction in the beating death of her 2-year-old daughter was overturned, Gabriela Hernandez is preparing for a new trial and a new defense. Unlike the first trial, Hernandez's attorneys will argue that she was a battered woman so paralyzed by fear that she could not stop her husband Rogelio from killing their daughter, Joselin. Hernandez's second trial will be closely watched.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In his last-ditch appeal to the Florida Supreme Court today, Al Gore will argue that the only way to prove he is the actual winner in the state is to count the roughly 14,000 disputed ballots from Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties, sources close to the vice president say. In his stinging ruling Monday, Leon County Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls said Gore had failed to demonstrate "a reasonable probability" that, even if further hand counts were ordered, the election result would be reversed.
NEWS
December 2, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In their offices atop Los Angeles high-rises, attorneys in some of the city's blue chip law firms paused at midmorning Friday to watch and listen as history unfolded before the U.S. Supreme Court. At desktop computers and conference room TVs, they gathered alone or in small groups to hear the unprecedented broadcast of legal arguments that could go a long way toward finally determining the outcome of the election battle between George W. Bush and Al Gore.
NEWS
December 2, 2000 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a pair of legal victories for George W. Bush, the Florida Supreme Court declined to call a new election in Palm Beach County over the use of its controversial "butterfly ballot" and refused to hasten the recount of disputed presidential ballots. As a result, Al Gore may find that his last best chance to win the White House now rests with Leon County Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls, who begins hearing testimony this morning in Gore's lawsuit contesting the certification of Texas Gov.
NEWS
December 1, 2000 | MARK Z. BARABAK and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From Washington to Tallahassee, the battle for the White House became a duel of legal papers and legislative tactics Thursday as the two sides prepared for today's historic hearing before the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Who has the legal power to decide the winner of the presidential race in Florida? In preparation for the oral arguments it will hear Friday in the case of George W. Bush vs. Palm Beach Canvassing Board, the U.S. Supreme Court was given three different answers Tuesday. And depending on how the justices want to answer the question, the legal briefs filed by lawyers representing Texas Gov. Bush, Vice President Al Gore and the Florida Legislature will give them plenty of ammunition.
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