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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barred from using medical necessity as a defense, two prominent marijuana advocates pleaded guilty to reduced drug charges Friday in Los Angeles federal court. The pleas by Todd McCormick and Peter McWilliams followed a judge's ruling earlier this month that the pair could not refer to California's medical marijuana initiative or to their own medical conditions in their upcoming trial.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today, nearly five years after becoming one of the most powerful influences over mass transit in Los Angeles, Chief U.S. District Judge Terry J. Hatter Jr. once again will find himself in the middle of a long-running legal battle with far-reaching implications. For Hatter is being called upon to weigh the interests of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority against those of the predominantly poor and minority passengers who depend on the MTA's bus system for transportation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999 | Cecilia Rasmussen
More than 80 years ago--long before addiction became unassailably fashionable and smokers became social pariahs--a Highland Park teenager burned his way into the city's consciousness with a brutal crime and his novel claim that an irrepressible urge for cigarettes drove him to it. The story gripped Los Angeles, in part because it was the first juvenile homicide ever committed in the rustic, hilly neighborhood, and in part because it set off what was then called the "biggest manhunt in the West."
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | From Associated Press
A woman has been acquitted of drunken driving after claiming that she failed four sobriety tests because she feared she would be beaten by her husband. The battered woman's syndrome defense is often used in murder cases, but Kathleen Barrett is one of the first defendants to use the strategy against a drunken driving charge, said her attorney, Victor Sloan. A jury found Barrett, 35, innocent of driving while under the influence. Instead, she was fined $35 for failing to stay in her lane.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by the grim faces of his House managers, Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.) said Friday that he had "no regrets" about pursuing his six-month crusade against President Clinton. But impeachment's unflagging pilot conceded he may have undermined his case by failing to call witnesses during House hearings and rushing to end the committee's probe last year. "I think we could have got more attention for what we were doing--which was important--by having witnesses," Hyde said.
NEWS
January 31, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House reacted angrily Saturday night to a report that independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr is considering whether to indict President Clinton before the president leaves office, charging that Starr, in disclosing his plans, is interfering with the ongoing Senate impeachment trial. "Besides reinforcing his own stereotype, Kenneth Starr is tampering with the Senate trial," said Jim Kennedy, a spokesman for the White House counsel's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1999 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven-year-old Inderjit Dosanjh flew out of Disneyland's Teacup ride, fractured a vertebra and ended up in a body cast for four months. Though a jury decided the theme park was not at fault, an angry Orange County Superior Court judge in 1997 called the verdict a "miscarriage of justice." He accused Disney's attorneys of hiding a key witness and improperly influencing the jury and granted the boy a new trial.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House Republicans who brought the impeachment charges against President Clinton have continually faulted the White House lawyers for ignoring the facts of the case. This week, they got what they asked for. In three days of arguments, the president's lawyers focused on the facts, and slowly and methodically picked apart the case constructed by the prosecutors.
NEWS
January 17, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House prosecutors, in opening arguments that at times were highly effective, appeared to make a strong, if circumstantial, case that President Clinton conspired to hide evidence in the Paula Corbin Jones case. They also showed that the crimes of perjury and obstruction of justice, if proved, could justify removing him from office. "It's a hard question," Rep. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dr. Warren Hern walks into a restaurant, he heads for a seat with its back to the wall. He installed bulletproof glass on his office windows and $1,400 worth of blinds at home. He varies his route to work. At public meetings, he wears a bulletproof vest. "I felt like a hunted animal . . . like I could be shot at any time," the Boulder, Colo., physician said of his life after being listed on a "wanted poster" and an Internet site launched by anti-abortion groups.
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