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NEWS
November 22, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and DAVID SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Within hours of the judicial ruling upholding the validity of manual recounts, Republicans launched a full-scale attack on Florida's Supreme Court. As a result, the already heated debate over who actually won the 2000 presidential election may now take on another deeply divisive coloration--a debate over judicial legitimacy. In their unanimous opinion, the court's seven justices, six of whom are Democrats, had seemed to go out of their way to protect themselves against precisely that issue.
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NEWS
November 22, 2000 | MARK Z. BARABAK and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Handing an important victory to Al Gore, the Florida Supreme Court ruled Tuesday night that manual recounting of presidential ballots could continue for several more days and the results must be included in the state's final tally. But the justices set a Sunday deadline for all work to be completed, which may cut short the canvassing in Florida's biggest county. Gore welcomed the decision, but an angry James A. Baker III, representing George W.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disappointed that Vice President Al Gore has received so few extra votes from a manual recount here, Democrats on Tuesday asked a court to order local election officials to consider more than 800 ballots that were only indented by voters, rather than poked out with a stylus. Gore's lawyers are due at Palm Beach County Circuit Court today to argue that the county canvassing board has disqualified too many of the so-called dimpled ballots since the hand-counting began Thursday.
NEWS
November 15, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The net result of the first legal battles over the presidential vote has been to throw the struggle for Florida--at least for now--back to the political arena. But Republicans served notice Tuesday evening that they will try to get back into court rapidly--declaring that they will ask a federal appeals court in Atlanta to hold an emergency hearing on a request to block further recounting of Florida's votes. How quickly the appeals court might consider the case was not immediately known.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and DAVID SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Vice President Al Gore's victory in Miami federal court Monday was only the first step in a rapidly unfolding legal battle in the war for Florida's 25 electoral votes, with the next major ruling expected today. With U.S. District Judge Donald M. Middlebrooks' refusal to block a hand recount of ballots in several Florida counties, attention shifts to state court in Tallahassee. Circuit Judge Terry P.
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The lawsuit by George W. Bush's presidential campaign to prevent a manual recount of votes in Florida is legally weak, but may be tactically advantageous, Democratic and Republican legal experts said Sunday. Legal scholars said it would be very difficult to convince a federal judge that the mere act of holding manual recounts would irreparably harm the rights of either Bush, the Republican candidate, or the seven Florida Republican voters who are his co-plaintiffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana City Councilman Ted R. Moreno will fight political corruption charges by alleging he was entrapped by the FBI, his attorney disclosed for the first time Wednesday. For two years, Moreno has strongly denied allegations that he extorted thousands of dollars from business owners with issues pending before the City Council. But according to interviews and court papers, Moreno plans to center his legal defense on whether the FBI crossed the line in its two-year corruption probe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved a legal finding that new cities in the San Fernando Valley or Harbor areas might have to make payments to Los Angeles as the price of secession. The 10-4 vote gave the city attorney's office permission to submit the opinion to the county agency that is setting the rules for a potential breakup of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal Judge Richard A. Paez took under advisement Monday a government motion to compel lawyers for Buford O. Furrow Jr. to declare by June 26 whether they will mount a mental health defense. Lawyers for the avowed white supremacist said they should not be required to reveal their intentions until Aug. 15 at the earliest, and only after Paez decides key defense motions, including one challenging the death penalty case against Furrow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A desperate woman shamed by her cheating husband drowns her young daughter and son in the ocean before being rescued by two beach-goers as she attempts to take her own life. She is not Narinder Virk, an Indian immigrant accused of trying to drown her two children last month in Channel Islands Harbor. But as in the first case, Virk's attorneys will argue that their client's culture and traditions influenced her behavior.
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