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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana City Councilman Ted R. Moreno will fight political corruption charges by alleging he was entrapped by the FBI, his attorney disclosed for the first time Wednesday. For two years, Moreno has strongly denied allegations that he extorted thousands of dollars from business owners with issues pending before the City Council. But according to interviews and court papers, Moreno plans to center his legal defense on whether the FBI crossed the line in its two-year corruption probe.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved a legal finding that new cities in the San Fernando Valley or Harbor areas might have to make payments to Los Angeles as the price of secession. The 10-4 vote gave the city attorney's office permission to submit the opinion to the county agency that is setting the rules for a potential breakup of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal Judge Richard A. Paez took under advisement Monday a government motion to compel lawyers for Buford O. Furrow Jr. to declare by June 26 whether they will mount a mental health defense. Lawyers for the avowed white supremacist said they should not be required to reveal their intentions until Aug. 15 at the earliest, and only after Paez decides key defense motions, including one challenging the death penalty case against Furrow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A desperate woman shamed by her cheating husband drowns her young daughter and son in the ocean before being rescued by two beach-goers as she attempts to take her own life. She is not Narinder Virk, an Indian immigrant accused of trying to drown her two children last month in Channel Islands Harbor. But as in the first case, Virk's attorneys will argue that their client's culture and traditions influenced her behavior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
At the attempted murder conspiracy trial of Sara Jane Olson, purported former SLA revolutionary, prosecutors are seeking to use the testimony of a deceased hardware store owner and evidence of Symbionese Liberation Army crimes unrelated to Olson. Prosecutors filed a motion arguing that the 1975 grand jury testimony of James Marshall be admitted as evidence because although he is no longer alive, his "testimony is simple, straightforward and unequivocal."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barred from using medical necessity as a defense, two prominent marijuana advocates pleaded guilty to reduced drug charges Friday in Los Angeles federal court. The pleas by Todd McCormick and Peter McWilliams followed a judge's ruling earlier this month that the pair could not refer to California's medical marijuana initiative or to their own medical conditions in their upcoming trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today, nearly five years after becoming one of the most powerful influences over mass transit in Los Angeles, Chief U.S. District Judge Terry J. Hatter Jr. once again will find himself in the middle of a long-running legal battle with far-reaching implications. For Hatter is being called upon to weigh the interests of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority against those of the predominantly poor and minority passengers who depend on the MTA's bus system for transportation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999 | Cecilia Rasmussen
More than 80 years ago--long before addiction became unassailably fashionable and smokers became social pariahs--a Highland Park teenager burned his way into the city's consciousness with a brutal crime and his novel claim that an irrepressible urge for cigarettes drove him to it. The story gripped Los Angeles, in part because it was the first juvenile homicide ever committed in the rustic, hilly neighborhood, and in part because it set off what was then called the "biggest manhunt in the West."
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | From Associated Press
A woman has been acquitted of drunken driving after claiming that she failed four sobriety tests because she feared she would be beaten by her husband. The battered woman's syndrome defense is often used in murder cases, but Kathleen Barrett is one of the first defendants to use the strategy against a drunken driving charge, said her attorney, Victor Sloan. A jury found Barrett, 35, innocent of driving while under the influence. Instead, she was fined $35 for failing to stay in her lane.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by the grim faces of his House managers, Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.) said Friday that he had "no regrets" about pursuing his six-month crusade against President Clinton. But impeachment's unflagging pilot conceded he may have undermined his case by failing to call witnesses during House hearings and rushing to end the committee's probe last year. "I think we could have got more attention for what we were doing--which was important--by having witnesses," Hyde said.
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