Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLegal System
IN THE NEWS

Legal System

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1995
Thank God we have the greatest legal system in the world. Otherwise the O.J. Simpson trial might have turned into a fiasco. EDWARD LINN San Diego
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 1, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Many Californians are outraged that state Sens. Leland Yee, Ronald S. Calderon and Roderick D. Wright, all of whom have been either accused or convicted of crimes, will continue to collect their $95,291 annual salaries while they're suspended from their jobs. It's a paid vacation, critics complain. On the public dime. In response, Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg introduced an amendment to the state Constitution on Friday - the same day he and his fellow senators suspended their colleagues - that would allow the Senate or Assembly to withhold compensation in the future when a legislator is suspended.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1986
In a letter to The Times entitled "Jury Duty's Waste" (March 30), James Harris of Tustin airs his dissatisfaction with the jury process. In his cynical comment, Harris suggests that attorneys use their peremptory challenges as a way of extending trial time by "days, weeks or months" in order to further their "money--making schemes." While the author of that letter may have been called for jury duty, it is evident that he has never been summoned as a defendant in a lawsuit tried by a jury.
OPINION
February 16, 2014 | By Wallace Shawn
Gossiping publicly about the private lives of well-known people is one of the most popular forms of licensed sadism that our society indulges in. It's permissible to play roughly with the cardboard figures of these people we don't know, to bully them, humiliate them, and treat them in ways we would never think of treating our neighbors or friends. In discussing their lives, our standards of accuracy are pitifully low, our manner is casual, and we openly smile and laugh in response to events that are not at all funny to those involved in them.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS
Here's one court where the claims are really small. The improvisation troupe ComedySportz is back with "ComedyCourt," a late-night legal lampoon poking fun at our seemingly boundless appetite for trivial, pointless or downright idiotic litigation. The troupe selects real-life plaintiffs who are pressing absurd cases and have agreed to appear before this kangaroo court just for laughs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Law in These Parts" sounds like the title of a routine western, maybe something starring Tom Mix or Johnny Mack Brown, but it turns out to be considerably more compelling and provocative. Directed by Ra'anan Alexandrowicz and winner of the World Cinema Grand Jury Prize at Sundance, this is the second superb Israeli documentary (after "The Gatekeepers") to come to town in less than a month and deal fearlessly with an aspect of that country's legal and political system. While "The Gatekeepers" centered on the activities of Shin Bet, Israel's FBI, "Law" has a narrower but equally potent focus: how the legal system Israel uses to rule the occupied Palestinian territories was put into place and how it has functioned over the 40-plus years of its existence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1999 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
The public will have an opportunity to talk to Superior Court judges and San Fernando Valley Bar Assn. members in an informal setting Wednesday evening at Cal State Northridge. The event, "Cross-Examine Your Los Angeles County Judges," will feature judges from the Van Nuys and San Fernando courthouses answering questions about how the courts work and other aspects of the legal system. Wednesday's event will run from 7 to 9 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1996 | CHRIS PANARO, Chris Panaro is chairman of Orange County Citizens Against Lawsuit Abuse in Santa Ana
Last spring's elections proved one thing: If you spend enough money and advertise on television nonstop for four weeks, you can convince people to do just about anything. That's exactly what the trial lawyers did, and to their credit it worked. Propositions 200, 201 and 202 were defeated by an estimated 39% of eligible voters in California. The trial lawyers will tell us the election results prove that civil justice reform is not important to Californians. But we know better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1986 | Dave Gatley
Cheryl Tomac Dempsey was the oldest of seven children. The Vista woman grew up in a very religious family with a caring but strict father who expected great things of her, including that she would become a missionary in New Guinea. But she saw great hypocrisy in her religious training and the options it presented, and she resented the fact that the choices in her life seemed to have been made for her.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
A young man is arrested off the street for a fatal shooting he did not commit. Never mind that he has an alibi and witnesses. Never mind that ballistics tests show no sign of gunpowder on his hands. Never mind that the young man who fingers him does so belatedly, and then can't describe him. Instead what ensues is a slow-motion train wreck of justice in which the suspect, Antonio Zuniga, is convicted ? twice ? by the same judge, even though investigators are discredited and the witness recants.
WORLD
November 28, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins
SAO PAULO, Brazil - In a country where less than 10% of prison inmates have finished high school, several major politicians and officials dealing with public funds are now behind bars in a corruption case. After a long-running prosecution, the imprisonments have sent shock waves across the political and legal systems of a nation where widespread political corruption has long been a given but where dangerous prisons are usually reserved for the poor. "The population has begun to believe that powerful people can be punished too," Sao Paulo criminal attorney Rafael Tucherman said last week.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Seems that Nostradamus has nothing on me. On Monday, musing about the weekend mayhem in Huntington Beach after the U.S. Open of Surfing, I peered into my crystal ball and proposed a high-tech solution to such violence: the Breathe Into the Phone to Prove You're Sober app. And like the ancient sage, it turns out I was right -- kind of. There is a high-tech solution, but it's staring us right in the face (or ear): the smartphone. Here's an interesting fact about modern life: When people today act badly, other people take their pictures . And they share those pictures.
NATIONAL
July 19, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - In an extraordinary 19-minute soliloquy, President Obama on Friday spoke bluntly and emotionally about his personal experiences with prejudice, the roots of African American skepticism toward the legal system and his optimism about the future of a nation still fractured along racial lines. The comments, in a surprise appearance in the White House briefing room, were Obama's most extensive and personal on race since his election almost five years ago. Obama spoke on the eve of planned national protests over the acquittal of George Zimmerman, who fatally shot Trayvon Martin, an unarmed African American teenager, in 2012.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
It's news when government identifies a genuine problem and takes reasoned steps to solve it. So here's news: The Obama administration has a plan to fix the broken U.S. patent system. The White House outlined the plan last week in a presentation distinguished by its freewheeling use of the term "patent troll," which isn't legalese but vernacular. It would have been a shame if the administration stopped there, but its initiative actually aims to dig down into what makes a troll a troll, and eradicate the problem from the roots.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
“Two years ago they were writing our obituary. Well, it didn't happen. California is back.” That's our governor talking. And he's right. Gov. Jerry Brown delivered his 11th State of the State address Thursday, and as usual, it was as eclectic as its speaker. As The Times reported , Brown “cited Irish poet William Butler Yeats on education, French writer Montaigne on laws, and the biblical story of Joseph and the Pharaoh on financial discipline.” He even defended his bullet-train project -- a too-expensive, too-complicated boondoggle if ever there was one -- by quoting from the children's classic “The Little Engine That Could”:  “I think I can, I think I can. And over the mountain the little engine went.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Law in These Parts" sounds like the title of a routine western, maybe something starring Tom Mix or Johnny Mack Brown, but it turns out to be considerably more compelling and provocative. Directed by Ra'anan Alexandrowicz and winner of the World Cinema Grand Jury Prize at Sundance, this is the second superb Israeli documentary (after "The Gatekeepers") to come to town in less than a month and deal fearlessly with an aspect of that country's legal and political system. While "The Gatekeepers" centered on the activities of Shin Bet, Israel's FBI, "Law" has a narrower but equally potent focus: how the legal system Israel uses to rule the occupied Palestinian territories was put into place and how it has functioned over the 40-plus years of its existence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1993 | ROBIN GREENE
The World Affairs Council will be tackling the legal system in a seminar Thursday that will consider ways to break legal gridlock and make the system "more user friendly," organizers said. Arthur Miller, a Harvard professor and legal editor for ABC News, will moderate the discussion at the Rockwell Science Center in Thousand Oaks from 5:15 to 9:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Smartly cast and with a sharp team behind the scenes, there is no good reason why "Dredd 3D" is such a clunk-headed action picture. In the future, a single urban core sprawls from Boston to D.C., patrolled by officers who function as a self-contained legal system - judge, jury and executioner. Judge Dredd (Karl Urban) and a training-day rookie (Olivia Thirlby) become trapped within a crime-ridden high-rise and are forced to fight their way up and out. Screenwriter and producer Alex Garland previously has taken on dystopian sci-fi in "28 Days Later," "Sunshine" and "Never Let Me Go," injecting each with a beating heart that is sorely lacking in this latest comic-book adaptation.
OPINION
July 25, 2012
As Americans speculate about why a young man in Colorado allegedly engaged in a nightmarish shooting rampage in a movie theater, lawyers for a convicted killer in Idaho are asking the Supreme Court to rule that states must allow defendants to plead not guilty by reason of insanity. The court should do so. James Holmes, the 24-year-old former graduate student accused of killing 12 people and injuring 58 during a midnight showing of "The Dark Knight Rises," could face the death penalty if convicted.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|