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NEWS
February 18, 1999 | Reuters
A group of women took the state of Alabama to court Wednesday over a state law that bans the sale of vibrators and other sex toys. The American Civil Liberties Union took the suit to U.S. District Court on behalf of Sherri Williams and other women who say their privacy rights have been violated. "It's a $10,000 fine and a year of hard labor if you get caught selling vibrators," said Williams, who runs two "romance boutiques" in Alabama.
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NEWS
February 18, 1999 | Reuters
A group of women took the state of Alabama to court Wednesday over a state law that bans the sale of vibrators and other sex toys. The American Civil Liberties Union took the suit to U.S. District Court on behalf of Sherri Williams and other women who say their privacy rights have been violated. "It's a $10,000 fine and a year of hard labor if you get caught selling vibrators," said Williams, who runs two "romance boutiques" in Alabama.
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NEWS
July 24, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Forrest (Fob) James Jr. has announced his support for a bill to end Alabama's policy of requiring most rape victims to pay for the exams needed to gather the semen, hair and fiber samples used to prosecute their attackers. The bill nearly died in the Legislature. Rape is the only Alabama crime in which the victim bears the cost of collecting evidence, said Anita Drummond, director of the state Crime Victims Compensation Commission.
NEWS
July 24, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Forrest (Fob) James Jr. has announced his support for a bill to end Alabama's policy of requiring most rape victims to pay for the exams needed to gather the semen, hair and fiber samples used to prosecute their attackers. The bill nearly died in the Legislature. Rape is the only Alabama crime in which the victim bears the cost of collecting evidence, said Anita Drummond, director of the state Crime Victims Compensation Commission.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- Now that Hurricane Isaac has passed , a political storm is brewing in Congress over a new effort by coastal lawmakers to secure a larger share of federal royalties from energy production off their shores to fund projects such as flood protection. But the idea faces opposition from lawmakers who say it would siphon away money needed to help pay Uncle Sam's bills. Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) stoked the debate by appealing to President Obama during his visit to the storm-battered Gulf Coast earlier this week to support letting states share 37.5% of federal revenues from energy production off their coasts.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2007 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
When Rick McKee, the editorial cartoonist of the Augusta Chronicle newspaper, set out to capture the historic and severe drought that is afflicting the Southeast, he did not draw parched rivers or shriveled crops or brown lawns: He drew an oafish, bloated hulk of a boy holding up a straw to slurp up water from a smaller boy's water fountain. Above the larger boy, a sign reads "Atlanta," above the other, "Everybody else."
BUSINESS
March 27, 1985 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, in a ruling that limits the taxing power of the states, held Tuesday that they may not impose higher taxes on out-of-state firms to promote home-state industry. The justices, in a 5-4 decision, decided that the aim of an Alabama "domestic-preference" tax law favoring Alabama-based insurance companies represented the "very sort of parochial discrimination" that the equal protection clause of the Constitution was intended to prevent.
NEWS
June 5, 1985 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court's school prayer decision probably will reduce pressure on Congress to approve a constitutional amendment permitting organized prayer in the classroom, legislators and representatives of several interest groups said Tuesday. But, they agreed, the ruling is also likely to step up pressure on state and local governments to enact moment-of-silence laws that meet the court's requirement that such moments have no religious connection.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2012 | By Ian Duncan, Washington Bureau
  The Virginia General Assembly is moving forward with a watered-down version of a controversial abortion bill, despite attracting national ire and ridicule because it would have required a woman to have an ultrasound probe inserted into her vagina before undergoing an abortion. In the new version of the bill, doctors would still have to perform an external ultrasound, but women would be allowed to refuse the more invasive procedure, though doctors must still offer to perform it. The national attention has come as an embarrassment to Virginia Gov. Robert McDonnell, who has been touted as a possible GOP vice presidential nominee, and has found Republicans embroiled in another fight over women's healthcare.
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