Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLegislation Estonia
IN THE NEWS

Legislation Estonia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | From Associated Press
Parliament will reconsider a citizenship law that classifies most Russians as foreigners after President Lennart Meri refused Wednesday to sign the controversial bill. "I have taken this step after much deliberation," the president said in a nationwide television address Wednesday evening. "I want to be sure that all the people in Estonia will be treated fairly."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | From Associated Press
Parliament will reconsider a citizenship law that classifies most Russians as foreigners after President Lennart Meri refused Wednesday to sign the controversial bill. "I have taken this step after much deliberation," the president said in a nationwide television address Wednesday evening. "I want to be sure that all the people in Estonia will be treated fairly."
Advertisement
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
The Kremlin appeared Tuesday to be gearing up for a showdown with the leadership in Estonia after publication of a commentary in Pravda, the official Communist Party daily, that blamed "openly anti-Soviet groups" for what it described as spiraling nationalist hysteria in the Baltic republic. The unsigned commentary, which according to Soviet sources had Central Committee approval, is the strongest official criticism to date of the Estonian leadership for failing to curb ethnic nationalism.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
The Kremlin appeared Tuesday to be gearing up for a showdown with the leadership in Estonia after publication of a commentary in Pravda, the official Communist Party daily, that blamed "openly anti-Soviet groups" for what it described as spiraling nationalist hysteria in the Baltic republic. The unsigned commentary, which according to Soviet sources had Central Committee approval, is the strongest official criticism to date of the Estonian leadership for failing to curb ethnic nationalism.
WORLD
May 18, 2002 | From Associated Press
WASHINGTON -- Underscoring the importance of the U.S. military alliance with Europe, Congress sent President Bush a bill he wanted Friday that endorses an expansion of NATO and authorizes security assistance for seven nations that hope to join. "The Cold War may be over, but the security and welfare of America and Europe are very closely linked," said Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.), a senior member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The Senate approved the bill Friday, 85 to 6.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Determined to lift the dead hand of Soviet central planning from their economies, the Baltic republics of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania are preparing to declare their "independence" from Moscow. Broadening President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's political and economic reforms, they plan to assert ownership of their natural resources, to take over most of the factories and enterprises now operated from Moscow and to free their economies from rigid government control. The moves in the Baltic republics, planned for next year, are likely to constitute a major step toward "market socialism"--a mixed economy of competitive state, cooperative and private businesses in which the economic forces of supply and demand and measures involving such things as taxes and interest rates replace state planning and central management.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|