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NEWS
February 1, 1999 | Associated Press
Tens of thousands of people marched Sunday to protest a bill that would give legal status to unmarried couples and, opponents claim, subvert "family values." The leftist government of Prime Minister Lionel Jospin has been pressing to make the Civil Solidarity Pact, known as PACS, law. Critics say the bill's real aim is to legalize homosexual marriages and ultimately allow gay couples to adopt children. Interior Minister Jean-Pierre Chevenement said nearly 100,000 people turned out for the march.
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NEWS
January 19, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a landmark victory for the Armenian diaspora, France on Thursday became the first major Western nation to pass legislation branding as genocide the deaths of up to 1.5 million Armenians at the hands of the Ottoman Turks during and after World War I.
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NEWS
January 19, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a landmark victory for the Armenian diaspora, France on Thursday became the first major Western nation to pass legislation branding as genocide the deaths of up to 1.5 million Armenians at the hands of the Ottoman Turks during and after World War I.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few people, it seems, are more intimately acquainted with taxes than the French. More than 45% of the wealth generated nationwide is grabbed by the revenue man, one of the world's biggest tax bites. The average adult works seven months of the year to pay taxes, direct and indirect. On Thursday, the government decided enough was enough. It announced an ambitious package of tax reductions worth nearly $16.5 billion over three years, beginning in 2001.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few people, it seems, are more intimately acquainted with taxes than the French. More than 45% of the wealth generated nationwide is grabbed by the revenue man, one of the world's biggest tax bites. The average adult works seven months of the year to pay taxes, direct and indirect. On Thursday, the government decided enough was enough. It announced an ambitious package of tax reductions worth nearly $16.5 billion over three years, beginning in 2001.
NEWS
July 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The French Senate approved a bill allowing police wide-ranging powers to make spot identity checks as part of a government crackdown on illegal immigration. The bill, passed 228 to 88, will allow police to ask anyone to present identity papers "no matter what his behavior."
BUSINESS
March 29, 1990 | From United Press International
The French government announced Wednesday that it will propose a total ban on cigarette advertising and impose new restrictions on publicizing alcoholic beverages. The proposal, which political observers believe is certain to be approved by the National Assembly this year, is a radical departure for France, where drinking wine, cognac or beer with breakfast is not uncommon and smoke-filled cafes dot the landscape.
NEWS
January 4, 1994 | WILLIAM DROZDIAK, THE WASHINGTON POST
France declared Monday that it would seek to become the first country to ban artificial impregnation for post-menopausal women as part of a landmark legislative effort to cope with the moral and medical dilemmas posed by genetic engineering.
NEWS
September 24, 1988 | From Reuters
The French government on Friday became the first Western government to approve the use of an abortion pill. Health Minister Claude Evin announced the decision after a government health commission said that problems with the drug--known as RU 486--had been ironed out by the manufacturer, Roussel Uclaf Laboratories. In France, the pill will be administered by doctors in specialized family planning centers. Prof.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
France's conservative government said Wednesday that it will seek to impose strict controls on artificial impregnation, including a requirement that infertile couples have the consent of the sperm donor and a judge's permission before receiving an embryo implant. The government was spurred by a growing national debate this week following the birth of twins to a 59-year-old, post-menopausal British woman, who received an embryo implant at an Italian clinic.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | Associated Press
Tens of thousands of people marched Sunday to protest a bill that would give legal status to unmarried couples and, opponents claim, subvert "family values." The leftist government of Prime Minister Lionel Jospin has been pressing to make the Civil Solidarity Pact, known as PACS, law. Critics say the bill's real aim is to legalize homosexual marriages and ultimately allow gay couples to adopt children. Interior Minister Jean-Pierre Chevenement said nearly 100,000 people turned out for the march.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
French legislators this week fought over one of the most divisive and acrimonious questions in this country's political life: what it takes for a person to be considered French. In the tightest legislative battle of its six-month rule, Socialist Prime Minister Lionel Jospin's government moved a step closer to sweeping away most, but not all, of the legal distinctions between the children of French citizens and those of foreigners living in France.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
France's conservative government said Wednesday that it will seek to impose strict controls on artificial impregnation, including a requirement that infertile couples have the consent of the sperm donor and a judge's permission before receiving an embryo implant. The government was spurred by a growing national debate this week following the birth of twins to a 59-year-old, post-menopausal British woman, who received an embryo implant at an Italian clinic.
NEWS
January 4, 1994 | WILLIAM DROZDIAK, THE WASHINGTON POST
France declared Monday that it would seek to become the first country to ban artificial impregnation for post-menopausal women as part of a landmark legislative effort to cope with the moral and medical dilemmas posed by genetic engineering.
NEWS
July 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The French Senate approved a bill allowing police wide-ranging powers to make spot identity checks as part of a government crackdown on illegal immigration. The bill, passed 228 to 88, will allow police to ask anyone to present identity papers "no matter what his behavior."
BUSINESS
June 7, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will the Marlboro Man ride off into the sunset for good? The French government Wednesday moved to ban all tobacco advertising in France by 1993, and American health groups are pushing laws that would force such ads out of existence in this country too. But a U.S. ban faces an uphill battle and, if adopted, might not hurt cigarette sales much, analysts say. In fact, magazines, newspapers, billboards and other media stand to lose out on the $1.5 billion the industry spends a year on advertising.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will the Marlboro Man ride off into the sunset for good? The French government Wednesday moved to ban all tobacco advertising in France by 1993, and American health groups are pushing laws that would force such ads out of existence in this country too. But a U.S. ban faces an uphill battle and, if adopted, might not hurt cigarette sales much, analysts say. In fact, magazines, newspapers, billboards and other media stand to lose out on the $1.5 billion the industry spends a year on advertising.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
French legislators this week fought over one of the most divisive and acrimonious questions in this country's political life: what it takes for a person to be considered French. In the tightest legislative battle of its six-month rule, Socialist Prime Minister Lionel Jospin's government moved a step closer to sweeping away most, but not all, of the legal distinctions between the children of French citizens and those of foreigners living in France.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1990 | From United Press International
The French government announced Wednesday that it will propose a total ban on cigarette advertising and impose new restrictions on publicizing alcoholic beverages. The proposal, which political observers believe is certain to be approved by the National Assembly this year, is a radical departure for France, where drinking wine, cognac or beer with breakfast is not uncommon and smoke-filled cafes dot the landscape.
NEWS
September 24, 1988 | From Reuters
The French government on Friday became the first Western government to approve the use of an abortion pill. Health Minister Claude Evin announced the decision after a government health commission said that problems with the drug--known as RU 486--had been ironed out by the manufacturer, Roussel Uclaf Laboratories. In France, the pill will be administered by doctors in specialized family planning centers. Prof.
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