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NEWS
March 27, 1990 | United Press International
Faced with a potentially disastrous nationwide boycott of Idaho potatoes, Gov. Cecil Andrus said Monday he will seek advice before deciding whether to sign a measure that would become the most restrictive state abortion law in the nation. The bill, which has been passed by both houses of the Legislature, probably will arrive on the governor's desk today. The bill would ban all abortions except in cases of severe fetal deformity, threat to the mother's health or in cases of rape or incest.
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NEWS
March 31, 1990 | LOUIS SAHAGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Cecil D. Andrus vetoed the nation's most restrictive state abortion bill Friday, ending the possibility that the legislation would lead to a U.S. Supreme Court review of the 1973 decision giving women the right to the abortion. The Democratic governor, who has long opposed abortion, said he killed the bill because of concerns that its restrictions were too severe and that it would not withstand constitutional scrutiny.
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NEWS
March 31, 1990 | LOUIS SAHAGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Cecil D. Andrus vetoed the nation's most restrictive state abortion bill Friday, ending the possibility that the legislation would lead to a U.S. Supreme Court review of the 1973 decision giving women the right to the abortion. The Democratic governor, who has long opposed abortion, said he killed the bill because of concerns that its restrictions were too severe and that it would not withstand constitutional scrutiny.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Cecil D. Andrus expressed his first public doubts about signing what would be the nation's most restrictive state abortion law. "I am concerned that this bill may narrow it to the point where a woman who has suffered rape, who has suffered incest or the mother's life is in danger might not be able to receive an abortion," he said at an impromptu news conference in Boise, Ida. "I'm looking at that," he said. "I'm agonizing over it."
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | From United Press International
The state House of Representatives voted 47 to 36 on Friday to approve a bill that would give Idaho the most restrictive abortion law in the nation. The measure, which now goes to the Senate, would make abortions illegal in the state as a means of birth control. It would ban all abortions except in cases of incest, profound physical or mental disability of the fetus or threats to the life or the health of the mother.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Cecil D. Andrus expressed his first public doubts about signing what would be the nation's most restrictive state abortion law. "I am concerned that this bill may narrow it to the point where a woman who has suffered rape, who has suffered incest or the mother's life is in danger might not be able to receive an abortion," he said at an impromptu news conference in Boise, Ida. "I'm looking at that," he said. "I'm agonizing over it."
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Abortion rights activists held a candlelight vigil outside the Idaho Capitol in Boise, promising to continue to fight a bill establishing the most restrictive abortion law in any state. "This issue is not over for us," the Rev. James Hulett of Freedom Means Choice told more than 400 supporters on the eve of an expected state Senate vote on the bill, which would send it to Democratic Gov. Cecil D. Andrus. Anti-abortion activists also pressed their case with Andrus.
OPINION
July 26, 1992
Imagine Yellowstone National Park without the Old Faithful geyser. America just wouldn't be the same. The geysers, fumaroles and hot pots of the United States' oldest national park attract millions of visitors. Yellowstone is one of only two geyser basins in the world that have not been destroyed or damaged by geothermal development. Now, outside the park, developers are beginning to drill wells into underground reservoirs that feed Old Faithful.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
An Idaho dairy responded Wednesday to an animal rights group's latest video showing the abuse of cows, saying the renewed attention is likely to spur more threats to its staff. "We are the ones who will pay for what happens to our animals," family-owned Bettencourt Dairies said in a statement. "Yet the things in this world that take place every day, who will stop that, the bullying of our child when he steps foot in the public school, he had nothing to do with this. " Mercy for Animals on Tuesday released a clip from 2012 of a worker, who was eventually sentenced to jail, sexually abusing a cow. The video is being used to help fight legislation in Idaho that would punish people who go undercover to film at farms.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | United Press International
Faced with a potentially disastrous nationwide boycott of Idaho potatoes, Gov. Cecil Andrus said Monday he will seek advice before deciding whether to sign a measure that would become the most restrictive state abortion law in the nation. The bill, which has been passed by both houses of the Legislature, probably will arrive on the governor's desk today. The bill would ban all abortions except in cases of severe fetal deformity, threat to the mother's health or in cases of rape or incest.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Abortion rights activists held a candlelight vigil outside the Idaho Capitol in Boise, promising to continue to fight a bill establishing the most restrictive abortion law in any state. "This issue is not over for us," the Rev. James Hulett of Freedom Means Choice told more than 400 supporters on the eve of an expected state Senate vote on the bill, which would send it to Democratic Gov. Cecil D. Andrus. Anti-abortion activists also pressed their case with Andrus.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | From United Press International
The state House of Representatives voted 47 to 36 on Friday to approve a bill that would give Idaho the most restrictive abortion law in the nation. The measure, which now goes to the Senate, would make abortions illegal in the state as a means of birth control. It would ban all abortions except in cases of incest, profound physical or mental disability of the fetus or threats to the life or the health of the mother.
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